I have the following code for a simple TCP server in Ruby:

# server.rb
require 'socket'

class Server
  def initialize(port)
    @port = port
  end

  def run
    Socket.tcp_server_loop(@port) do |connection|
      Thread.new do
        loop do
          puts "IO: #{IO.select([connection]).inspect} - data: #{connection.read}"
        end
      end
    end
  end
end

server = Server.new(16451)
server.run

As well as this trivial TCP client code:

# client.rb
require 'socket'

client = TCPSocket.new('localhost', 16451)
client.write('stuff')

It is my understanding that connection.read in server.rb should block if no data is present on the socket. However, when I run this on my macbook (OS X 10.12.5), it keeps spitting out the following output:

IO: [[#<Socket:fd 12>], [], []] - data: stuff
IO: [[#<Socket:fd 12>], [], []] - data: 
IO: [[#<Socket:fd 12>], [], []] - data: 
IO: [[#<Socket:fd 12>], [], []] - data: 
IO: [[#<Socket:fd 12>], [], []] - data: 
IO: [[#<Socket:fd 12>], [], []] - data: 
IO: [[#<Socket:fd 12>], [], []] - data: 
IO: [[#<Socket:fd 12>], [], []] - data: 
...

It seems that IO.select thinks there is data available to read on the socket, while no such data has been sent.

How can I achieve a blocking read when working with sockets in Ruby? Am I overlooking something?


Matt's answer pointed me in the right direction. For future readers, here's my new code.

# server.rb
require 'socket'

class Server
  BYTESIZE_OF_PACKED_INTEGER = [1].pack('i').bytesize

  def initialize(port)
    @port = port
  end

  def run
    Socket.tcp_server_loop(@port) do |connection|
      Thread.new do
        while packed_msg_bytesize = connection.read(BYTESIZE_OF_PACKED_INTEGER)
          msg_bytesize = packed_msg_bytesize.unpack('i').first
          msg = connection.read(msg_bytesize)
          puts msg
        end
      end
    end
  end
end

server = Server.new(16451)
server.run

And the client code.

# client.rb
require 'socket'

msg = 'stuff'
msg_bytesize = msg.bytesize
packed_msg_bytesize = [msg_bytesize].pack('i')

client = TCPSocket.new('localhost', 16451)
client.write(packed_msg_bytesize)
client.write(msg)
up vote 1 down vote accepted

read will block if there is no data, but not at EOF. The IO#read docs say:

When this method is called at end of file, it returns nil or "", depending on length: read, read(nil), and read(0) return "", read(positive_integer) returns nil.

Since calling read on EOF doesn’t block, select will return the IO as readable straight away.

In your code the first call to read will block until all the data is read from the connection (i.e. the other end has closed it). From then it will be at EOF, so select will return it as ready, and read will return an empty string immediately.

  • do you know if there's any way to have it block at EOF? I'm playing around with implementing a simple chat server & client, and I was hoping to have a long-lived connection between client and server. The last thing I want is for the server to go to 100% cpu just actively looping over sockets that will have no data on them most of the time. – Reck Nov 11 '17 at 20:59
  • You’ll probably want to detect and remove those connections anyway, so you don’t want to skip over them. Note there is a difference between a socket with no data available (which is still connected to the other end) and a socket at EOF (which is disconnected and you just need to close it). – matt Nov 11 '17 at 21:17
  • you're absolute right! – Reck Nov 11 '17 at 22:45

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