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I am learning Kubernetes recently, and I am not very clear about the difference between "kubectl apply" and "kubectl replace". Is there any situation that we can only use one of them?

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The difference is that replace first deletes the resources, then creates it from the file you give it; whereas apply attempts to directly update, in the current live resource, only the attributes you give it in the file. See In-place updates and disruptive updates.

A consequence of that is that the file you use in an apply can be an incomplete spec, ie only what you want to change; whereas with replace, the spec must be complete.

So you could apply a file that changes only an annotation, without specifying any other properties of the resource; but if you tried to use the same file with a replace command, the command would fail, due to missing information.

Also, apply only works on some properties of resources; if you need to update properties for which apply doesn't apply (sorry for the pun!), you have to use replace instead.

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    This does not seem to happen in practice. If I kubectl apply a new deployment with no replica count specified - it seems to default to 0 or 1. – Chris Stryczynski Aug 16 '19 at 11:49
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    This answer is entirely incorrect, and seems to be describing the commands patch and replace --force instead. – Code Aug 18 '19 at 16:03
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From: https://github.com/kubernetes/website/blob/master/content/en/docs/concepts/cluster-administration/manage-deployment.md

Disruptive updates

In some cases, you may need to update resource fields that cannot be updated once initialized, or you may just want to make a recursive change immediately, such as to fix broken pods created by a Deployment. To change such fields, use replace --force, which deletes and re-creates the resource.

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    I think this is more about the --force option than about kubectl replace itself, as can be seen with kubectl replace --help: --force=false: Delete and re-create the specified resource. The docs do not contain infomation about what distinguishes "kubectl replace" from "kubectl apply". – Florian von Stosch Oct 29 '18 at 14:42
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The difference between apply and replace is similar to the difference between apply and create.

create / replace uses the imperative approach, while apply uses the declarative approach.

If you used create to create the resource, then use replace to update it. If you used apply to create the resource, then use apply to update it.

Note that both replace and apply require a complete spec, and both create the new resources first before deleting the old ones (unless --force is specified).

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    For a more thorough explanation and comparison, see this section in the Kubernetes docs. – Rob van Maris Dec 2 '19 at 15:23
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you can add option -v=8 when use kubectl, and you will find the log like this

apply --force
patch 422
delete 200
get 200
get 200
get 404
post 201

replace --force
get 200
delete 200
get 404
post 201
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kubectl apply .. will use various heuristics to selectively update the values specified within the resource.

kubectl replace ... will replace / overwrite the entire object with the values specified. This should be preferred as you're avoiding the complexity of the selective heuristic update. However some resources like ingresses/load balancers can't really be replaced as they're immutable.

Example of the heuristic update leading to non obvious operation: https://github.com/kubernetes/kubernetes/issues/67135

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I have written up a thorough explanation of the differences between apply, replace, and patch: Kubernetes Apply vs. Replace vs. Patch. It includes an explanation that the current top-ranked answer to this question is wrong.

Briefly, kubectl apply uses the provided spec to create a resource if it does not exist and update, i.e., patch, it if it does. The spec provided to apply need only contain the required parts of a spec, when creating a resource the API will use defaults for the rest and when updating a resource it will use its current values.

The kubectl replace completely replaces the existing resource with the one defined by the provided spec. replace wants a complete spec as input, including read-only properties supplied by the API like .metadata.resourceVersion, .spec.nodeName for pods, .spec.clusterIP for services, and .secrets for service accounts. kubectl has some internal tricks to help you get that right, but typically the use case for replace is getting a resource spec, changing a property, and then using that changed, complete spec to replace the existing resource.

The kubectl replace command has a --force option which actually does not use the replace, i.e., PUT, API endpoint. It forcibly deletes (DELETE) and then recreates, (POST) the resource using the provided spec.

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