I`m not sure where the borders of authorization with ABAC/XACML are and where I should use validation.


Example 1

I have a class User and a class Message. When user U1 creates a new message M1 then the creator-attribute of M1 must be U1.

Example 2

I have a class User. When someone creates a new user U2 then the password size should be larger then 8.

Example 3

I have a class User. When someone creates a new user U3 then the username should be unique.


But where should I check that. Should I validate it programmatically or authorize it with a request to the PEP. Especially Example 2 is not really an "your are not allowed to do that"-problem (authorization) and more a "you have done something wrong"-problem (validation).

up vote 1 down vote accepted

None of the examples you state are good examples of ABAC/XACML.

Example #1

When user U1 creates a new message M1 then the creator-attribute of M1 must be U1.

This is entirely business logic. The act of creating a message will set the owner attribute of M1 to U1. It has nothing to do with XACML. XACML is about authorization i.e. whether a user is allowed to do an action. In this case, you could write a XACML rule about whether user U1 can create a message; whether user U1 can view or edit a message belonging to U2.

Example #2

I have a class User. When someone creates a new user U2 then the password size should be larger then 8.

This is validation from the PoV of your application. Your app is not about authentication or passwords. It relies on the password manager. The password manager itself (e.g. LDAP, AD...) has policies about password strength / lifetime / format. Those policies could be in XACML though, to-date, I've only seen proprietary formats instead.

Example 3

I have a class User. When someone creates a new user U3 then the username should be unique.

Again, this is about validation. This has nothing to do with your app but rather with the user account management solution you use e.g. LDAP. In there, you could decide to have rules that forbid the same username or forbid certain characters e.g. the @ sign. User management solutions could definitely use XACML but from your app's PoV, that's orthogonal.

  • Thanks! You answered the question, but I think my fault was to use Users in the examples. E.g. Example 1 is a REST interface and the Creator is an attribute of it. Only an admin can choose an other creator then himself. Example 2 could be a BankAccount which must have a positive balance on creation. Example 3 could be a class Building which must have a unique Adress. I think all three examples could solved with ABAC/XACML, but I'm not sure if they should. How can I distinguish authorisation and validation? Isn't ABAC/XACML business logic as well? – benkuly Nov 21 '17 at 9:04
  • To cut a long story short, is it authorisation or validation when we work on field-level (can a subject do an action like CREATE CHANGE DELETE with a specific field of a resource depending on the value of this field and other constraints)? – benkuly Nov 21 '17 at 13:04
  • 1
    that would be authorization. Bottom line: do you care about reporting on the fact a user is trying to do a given action on a given resource? If yes, it's authorization – David Brossard Nov 21 '17 at 19:24

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