I searched for this question on stackoverflow and google and I couldn't find any proper answer.

How do I ignore fields from an object within an object?

I think it will be much easier to understand with an example:

(Editors note, in title: Class1=Engine a field for Class2=Car)

class Car {
    Integer id;
    Integer numberOfWheels;
    Engine engine;
}   

class Engine {
    Integer id;
    String name;
    String producer;
    Integer horsePower;
    Integer weight; 
}

The Car JSON should consist of all fields, but the Engine object within the Car object should be limited to id, name, producer.

{
  "id":1,
  "numberOfWheels":4,
  "engine": {
    "id":1,
    "name":"some engine"
    "producer":"some engine producer"
  }
}

The Engine JSON should however consist of all fields id, name, producer, horsePower, weight

{
    "id":1,
    "name":"some engine"
    "producer":"some engine producer"
    "horsePower":250
    "weight":500
}

Just to clarify. The fields horsePower and weight should only be ignored in the JSON generated from Car.

  • Can you use gson or do you need to rely on Spring json libs? Unfamiliar to Spring and its json handling, what json implementation Spring uses? – pirho Nov 11 '17 at 20:44
  • I can use gson, I do not have to stick to spring only. I am just looking for the best practice and typesafe solution. – kkflf Nov 11 '17 at 20:47
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Have a look on gsons JsonSerializer and ExclusionStrategy. Maybe not the most terse way to do it - especially compared to your own solution - but a good option in general.

To enable Car to have some special treatment create JsonSerializer like

public class CarSerializer implements JsonSerializer<Car> {
    private final Gson gson = new GsonBuilder()
            .addSerializationExclusionStrategy(new FieldExclusionStrategy()).create();

    @Override
    public JsonElement serialize(Car arg0, Type arg1, JsonSerializationContext arg2) {
        return new JsonParser().parse(gson.toJson(arg0));
    }
}

Above has its own gson to handle only Car and not to mess any other serialization. Beforementioned registers ExclusionStrategy to its own private use that checks that if Cars field is Engine then any unwanted field in Engine is skipped.

public class FieldExclusionStrategy  implements ExclusionStrategy {
    private Set<String> ignored = 
            new HashSet<String>(Arrays.asList( new String[]{"horsePower","weight"}));
    @Override
    public boolean shouldSkipField(FieldAttributes arg0) {
        if(arg0.getDeclaringClass().isAssignableFrom(Engine.class))
            if(ignored.contains(arg0.getName())) return true;
        return false;
    }       
    @Override
    public boolean shouldSkipClass(Class<?> arg0) { return false; }
}

And it can be used with gson that registers JsonSerializer as its type adapter for Car.class:

Gson gson = new GsonBuilder().setPrettyPrinting()
      .registerTypeAdapter(Car.class, new CarSerializer()).create();
  • Thanks, this was what I was looking for. The only issue with the solution is that it is not typesafe given that you have to provided the exclusions as Strings. I do however struggle too see how this can be done typesafe and I guess there is not perfect solution for this. I am unsure if it is wroth the effort to create ExclusionStrategy, because this could potential be a lot of exclusions for the same object but for different wrapper objects. Would you recommend to use ExclusionStrategy over my solution? This is not for a specific problem, I just want to find the best practice solution – kkflf Nov 11 '17 at 21:44
  • 1
    Yes, not typesafe all the way and not perfect in error checking either. But i guess you can handle that part from this point on i'm sure it is possible still. What comes to your solution it is good once in a lifetime but i tend to prefer stuff that does not interfere with entities/models in other words my solution is kind a view to your entities/models and you can create as many views you want without modifying your classes anymore or possibly pose them to some nasty side-effects. – pirho Nov 11 '17 at 21:51
  • Very good point about cross cutting concerns. Thanks a lot for your help. It is always great with a second opinion. – kkflf Nov 11 '17 at 21:53

I got impatience and decided to create a temporary solution until I find a better way. This solution may or may not be best practice, but I do not have any better solution.

I have decided to post my temporary solution if anyone ever finds this question and wonder about a solution.

I am still looking for a typesafe and best practice solution, so if anyone got any answers please post it. I will accept your answer regardless of when you post your solution.

class Car {
    Integer id;
    Integer numberOfWheels;
    @JsonIgnore
    Engine engine;

    @JsonProperty("engine")
    public Map<String, Object> getEngineFormatted(){
        return engine == null ? null : engine.getFormatted();
    }
}   

class Engine {
    Integer id;
    String name;
    String producer;
    Integer horsePower;
    Integer weight; 

    public Map<String, Object> getFormatted(){
        Map<String, Object> map = new HashMap<>();

        map.put("id", id);
        map.put("name", name);
        map.put("producer", producer);

        return map;
    }
}

Car JSON:

{
  "id":1,
  "numberOfWheels":4,
  "engine": {
    "id":1,
    "name":"some engine"
    "producer":"some engine producer"
  }
}

Engine JSON

{
    "id":1,
    "name":"some engine"
    "producer":"some engine producer"
    "horsePower":250
    "weight":500
}

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