One of the assignments I am working on leading up to exams had me create

data Exp =  T | F | And Exp Exp | Or Exp Exp | Not Exp deriving (Eq, Show, Ord, Read)

Then it asked to make

folde :: a -> a -> (a -> a -> a) -> (a -> a -> a) -> (a -> a) -> Exp -> a

This is what I came up with

folde :: a -> a -> (a -> a -> a) -> (a -> a -> a) -> (a -> a) -> Exp -> a
folde t f a o n T = t
folde t f a o n F = f
folde t f a o n (And x y) = a (folde t f a o n x) (folde t f a o n y)
folde t f a o n (Or x y) = o (folde t f a o n x) (folde t f a o n y)
folde t f a o n (Not x) = n (folde t f a o n x)

The assignment asks for evb, evi and evh.

They are all supposed to work with one single call to folde using correct parameters.

Evb evaluates boolean expressions.

evb :: Exp -> Bool
evb = folde True False (&&) (||) not

Evi evaluates to an integer, treating T as Int 1, F as Int 5, And as +, Or as * and Not as negate.

evi :: Exp -> Int
evi = folde 1 5 (+) (*) negate 

So far so good, it all works. I'll be happy for any feedback on this as well.


However, I can't seem to understand how to solve the evh. evh is supposed to calculate the heigh of the tree.

It should be evh :: Exp -> Int

The assignment says it should treat T and F as height 1. It goes on that Not x should evaluate to height x + 1. And and Or has the height of its tallest subtree + 1.

I can't seem to figure out what I should pass on to my folde function

  • 2
    Slight improvement for the folde function, if you're not using the arguments, you can replace them with a _, which makes the definition a bit easier to read by removing unnecessary bits. example: folde t _ _ _ _ T = t – Zpalmtree Nov 11 '17 at 20:16
  • 1
    Hint: what should be the a in the folde function? – Willem Van Onsem Nov 11 '17 at 20:18
up vote 8 down vote accepted

The assignment says it should treat T and F as height 1. It goes on that Not x should evaluate to height x + 1. And and Or has the height of its tallest subtree + 1.

You can write this pretty directly with explicit recursion:

height T = 1
height F = 1
height (Not x) = height x + 1
height (And x y) = max (height x) (height y) + 1
height (Or  x y) = max (height x) (height y) + 1

Now, how do you write this with folde? The key thing about recursive folding is that folde gives each of your functions the result of folding all the subtrees. When you folde on And l r, it folds both subtrees first, and then passes those results into the argument to folde. So, instead of you manually calling height x, folde is going to calculate that for you and pass it as an argument, so your own work ends up something like \x y -> max x y + 1. Essentially, split height into 5 definitions, one per constructor, and instead of destructuring and recursing down subtrees, take the heights of the subtrees as arguments:

heightT = 1 -- height T = 1
heightF = 1 -- height F = 1
heightN x = x + 1 -- height (Not x) = height x + 1
heightA l r = max l r + 1 -- height (And l r) = max (height l) (height r) + 1
heightO l r = max l r + 1 -- height (Or  l r) = max (height l) (height r) + 1

Feed them to folde, and simplify

height = folde 1 1  -- T F
               ao   -- And
               ao   -- Or
               (+1) -- Not
         where ao x y = max x y + 1


And now for something new! Take this definition:

data ExpF a = T | F | Not a | And a a | Or a a
              deriving (Functor, Foldable, Traversable)

This looks like your Exp, except instead of recursion it's got a type parameter and a bunch of holes for values of that type. Now, take a look at the types of expressions under ExpF:

T :: forall a. ExpF a
Not F :: forall a. ExpF (ExpF a)
And F (Not T) :: forall a. ExpF (ExpF (ExpF a))

If you set a = ExpF (ExpF (ExpF (ExpF (ExpF ...)))) (on to infinity) in each of the above, you find that they can all be made to have the same type:

T             :: ExpF (ExpF (ExpF ...))
Not F         :: ExpF (ExpF (ExpF ...))
And F (Not T) :: ExpF (ExpF (ExpF ...))

Infinity is fun! We can encode this infinitely recursive type with Fix

newtype Fix f = Fix { unFix :: f (Fix f) }
-- Compare
-- Type  level: Fix f = f (Fix f)
-- Value level: fix f = f (fix f)
-- Fix ExpF = ExpF (ExpF (ExpF ...))
-- fix (1:) =    1:(   1:(  1: ...))
-- Recover original Exp
type Exp = Fix ExpF
-- Sprinkle Fix everywhere to make it work
Fix T :: Exp
Fix $ And (Fix T) (Fix $ Not $ Fix F) :: Exp
-- can also use pattern synonyms
pattern T' = Fix T
pattern F' = Fix F
pattern Not' t = Fix (Not t)
pattern And' l r = Fix (And l r)
pattern Or' l r = Fix (Or l r)
T' :: Exp
And' T' (Not' F') :: Exp

And now here's the nice part: one definition of fold to rule them all:

fold :: Functor f => (f a -> a) -> Fix f -> a
fold alg (Fix ffix) = alg $ fold alg <$> ffix
-- ffix :: f (Fix f)
-- fold alg :: Fix f -> a
-- fold alg <$> ffix :: f a
-- ^ Hey, remember when I said folds fold the subtrees first?
-- Here you can see it very literally

Here's a monomorphic height

height = fold $ \case -- LambdaCase extension: \case ... ~=> \fresh -> case fresh of ...
  T -> 1
  F -> 1
  Not x -> x + 1
  And x y -> max x y + 1
  Or  x y -> max x y + 1

And now a very polymorphic height (in your case it's off by one; oh well).

height = fold $ option 0 (+1) . fmap getMax . foldMap (Option . Just . Max)
height $ Fix T -- 0
height $ Fix $ And (Fix T) (Fix $ Not $ Fix F) -- 2

See the recursion-schemes package to learn these dark arts. It also makes this work for base types like [] with a type family, and removes the need to Fix everything with said trickery + some TH.

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