var movies =
[ 
  {
    title: "Shawshank",
    rating: 5,
    hasWatched: true
  },
  {
    title: "Boardwalk empire",
    rating: 5,
    hasWatched: true
  },
  {
    title: "bladerunner",
    rating: "unkown",
    hasWatched: false
  },
  {
    title: "Ratatouille",
    rating: 4,
    hasWatched: true
  }
]

for(var i = 0; i <movies.length; i++)
{
if(movies[i].hasWatched)
  {
      console.log("You have seen " + movies[i].title + " - " + 
  movies[i].rating);
  }
else (movies[i].hasWatched !== true)
  {
      console.log("You have not seen " + movies[i].title + " - " + 
  movies[i].rating);
  }
}

When i change the else-if to else it produces this output:

  • You have seen Shawshank - 5
  • You have not seen Shawshank - 5
  • You have seen Boardwalk empire - 5
  • You have not seen Boardwalk empire - 5
  • You have not seen bladerunner - unkown
  • You have seen Ratatouille - 4
  • You have not seen Ratatouille - 4

Why does the code seem to fall through in this case?

I am particularly interested in why bladerunner is only output one. The only apparent difference is that the rating property is "string" and not "number".

Best

  • 3
    It's else if not else – Dai Nov 11 '17 at 20:10
  • 1
    remove (movies[i].haswatched !== true) – alen Nov 11 '17 at 20:11
  • 1
    else shouldn't even work with statement – Flash Thunder Nov 11 '17 at 20:11
  • 2
    Else should not have a condition – Jonathon Nov 11 '17 at 20:11
  • Is this cause by giving Else a condition? – Zachary Adams Nov 11 '17 at 20:14
up vote 2 down vote accepted

The else statement doesn't use a conditional expression. The expression followed by the else statement is executed unconditionally.

In this example:

else (movies[i].haswatched !== true)
  {
      console.log("You have not seen " + movies[i].title + " - " + 
  movies[i].rating);
  }
}

The else statement will execute the expression (movies[i].haswatched !== true), which has no effect whatsoever. It's like a statement foo === true;. It's interpreted, executed, and it has no effect whatsoever on the program.

The posted code is equivalent to this, the semicolons I added to clarify the end of statements:

for(var i = 0; i <movies.length; i++)
{
  if(movies[i].hasWatched)
  {
      console.log("You have seen " + movies[i].title + " - " + 
  movies[i].rating);
  }
  else (movies[i].hasWatched !== true);

  console.log("You have not seen " + movies[i].title + " - " + movies[i].rating);
}

That is, the last console.log statement is always executed.

You probably meant to write like this:

if (movies[i].hasWatched) {
  // ...
} else {
  // ...
}
for(var i = 0; i <movies.length; i++)
{
  if(movies[i].hasWatched)
  {
       console.log("You have seen " + movies[i].title + " - " +   movies[i].rating);
  }
  else
  {
        console.log("You have not seen " + movies[i].title + " - " + 
                     movies[i].rating);
  }
}

use only else instead of giving another condition. it will solve the problem :)

You need either an if for checking another condition

} else if (movies[i].haswatched !== true)
//     ^^

or omit the condition, because you checked already the condition with a true condition, then you need just for the else part no new check with reverse condition.

} else {
    //...
}

var movies = [{ title: "Shawshank", rating: 5, hasWatched: true }, { title: "Boardwalk empire", rating: 5, hasWatched: true }, { title: "bladerunner", rating: "unkown", hasWatched: false }, { title: "Ratatouille", rating: 4, hasWatched: true }],
    i;

for (i = 0; i < movies.length; i++) {
    if (movies[i].hasWatched) {
        console.log("You have seen " + movies[i].title + " - " + movies[i].rating);
    } else {
        console.log("You have not seen " + movies[i].title + " - " + movies[i].rating);
    }
}

  • This looks like an open and shut case. – Tanner Babcock Nov 11 '17 at 20:17

You've been tricked by JavaScript tendency to play along with whatever you through at it...

When you have an if .. else statement, the statement following the else keyword is executed when the if condition is falsy. In your case, that statement is simply a comparison within parentheses, just as you would write:

var something = 1;
(something === 1);

Perfectly legal, not very useful.

After that, you have another valid piece of code, a simple block, like this:

var something = 1;
{
   alert(something);
}

Again, perfectly legal, but in its on, not useful.


So how does this cause the output you saw?

Well, the code block after the if .. else is executed for every item. You always see "You have not seen...". The if part also prints those items with hasWatched === true.

Ohh, and that Bladerunner row? that's just the value of rating for that object...

When you give else a condition it thinks it's the code that should be executed when the if isn't true. And as a result the code below is seen as just another block to be run every time.

Try running this:

if (false) {
  console.log("hello")
} else(console.log("whoops")) // this turns into the else block to be run when if is false.
{
  console.log("goodbye") // this runs every time.
}

This is a result of the fact that you can (but probably shouldn't) write if/else like this:

if (false)
    console.log("if")
else console.log("else") 

Adding parenthesis doesn't change the else block. This is identical:

if (false)
    console.log("if")
else (console.log("else"))

The short answer is (as mentioned by several other answers): else statement does not accept/evaluate a predicate.

Explanation:

if-else is an expression for creating two branches in the program flow, and letting the flow to be chosen by the result of evaluating the predicate of the if statement.

After the predicate is evaluated to a Boolean Condition, then depending on whether the result is a true or false, the if-block or * else-block* of the expression will be executed, respectively.

Simple Program Without if-else

Let's say the flowing program executes two statements: (begin) and (end)

// (beging)
// (end)

The flow of this program would look like:

   (begin)
      |
      |
    (end)

Simple Program with if-else

We inject an if-else expression in the middle of the previous program as follow:

// (begin)
if( predicate ) {
    // (A) if-block
}
else {
    // (B) else-block (or alternative-block)
}
// (end)

Which is equivalent* to:

// (begin)
if( predicate ) {
    // (A) if-block
}
else if ( !predicate ){
    // (B) else-block (or alternative-block)
}
// (end)

And the flow now is changed to:

   (begin)
      |
      |
     / \
    /   \
  (A)   (B)
    \   /
     \ /
      |
      |
    (end)

Simple Program with if else-if

We can chain if-else expressions and create if else-if else expressions. To do so we need to have an if statement, followed by any number of else if (or in some languages elif) statements, and finally, followed by an else statement:

// (begin)
if( predicate_1 ) {
    // (A) if-block
}
else if ( predicate_2 ){
    // (B) else-if-block (or alternative-block)
}
// more else-if statements can be added here
else {
    // (C) else-block (or otherwise-block)
}
// (end)

So if we look at the flow, adding else-if statements, increases the ways we can get from (begin) to (end)

   (begin)
      |
      |
     /|\
    / | \
   /  |  \
  /   |   \
(A)  (B)  (C)
  \   |   /
   \  |  /
    \ | /
     \|/
      |
      |
    (end)

*NOTE: In some languages like Haskell you are required to have complete conditional expressions (i.e. an else statement if required to close the gap in the conditional expression). So for example, in Haskell, the following will not compile:

if predicate_1
then  -- if block
else if predicate_2
then -- else-if block

that is because at the end there needs to be an else statement to close the gap, so the following fixes the error:

if predicate_1
then  -- if block
else if predicate_2
then -- else-if block
else -- else block

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