47

How do you check if a terraform string contains another string?

For example, I want to treat terraform workspaces with "tmp" in the name specially (e.g. allowing rds instances to be deleted without a snapshot), so something like this:

locals
{
  is_tmp = "${"tmp" in terraform.workspace}"
}

As far as I can tell, the substr interpolation function doesn't accomplish this.

10 Answers 10

70

For terraform 0.12.xx apparently you are suppose to use regexall to do this.

From the manual for terraform 0.12.XX: regexall() documentation

regexall can also be used to test whether a particular string matches a given pattern, by testing whether the length of the resulting list of matches is greater than zero.

Example from the manual:

> length(regexall("[a-z]+", "1234abcd5678efgh9"))
2

> length(regexall("[a-z]+", "123456789")) > 0
false

Example applied to your case in terraform 0.12.xx syntax should be something like:

locals
{
  is_tmp = length(regexall(".*tmp.*", terraform.workspace)) > 0
}

It also specifically says in the manual not to use "regex" but instead use regexall.

If the given pattern does not match at all, the regex raises an error. To test whether a given pattern matches a string, use regexall and test that the result has length greater than zero.

As stated above this is because you will actually get an exception error when you try to use it in the later versions of 0.12.xx that are out now when you run plan. This is how I found this out and why I posted the new answer back here.

2
34

You can indirectly check for substrings using replace, e.g.

locals
{
  is_tmp = "${replace(terraform.workspace, "tmp", "") != terraform.workspace}"
}
3
  • 7
    I hope this isn't the best answer. Also as far as I can tell I can't define a terraform contains function (I guess I could define a contains terraform module that does this, but the module instantiation would be more verbose than just copying this logic).
    – JDiMatteo
    Commented Nov 11, 2017 at 22:50
  • 4
    quite sad that the contains function only works with lists.. I have strings that contain separators so i can use split to test ... but it will break if in the future we change separators or something else... :( Commented Nov 20, 2017 at 5:52
  • As an example to use split as suggested by @VincentDeSmet enabled = "${contains(split(".", var.instance_type), "t2") ? false : true }" Commented Aug 13, 2019 at 21:02
18

Terraform introduced strcontains in the most recent version (v1.5.0) which can be used here:

locals {
    substring_present = strcontains(mystring, mysubstring) # returns True
}
5

The length of the list produced by the split function is greater than one when the separator is a substring.

locals {
  is_tmp = length(split("tmp", terraform.workspace)) > 1
}
5

Similar to MechaStorm's answer, with Terraform 0.12.7+, you can use regex to return a Boolean value if your string contains a particular substring:

locals {
  is_tmp = contains(regex("^(?:.*(tmp))?.*$",terraform.workspace),"tmp")
}

The regex query returns a list of capture groups for any characters before "tmp", "tmp" if found, any characters after "tmp". Then, contains looks for "tmp" in the list and returns true or false.

0
2

Use replace( string, search, replace ) as in the snippet:

// string contains ABBA = result is ABBA
output "match" {
  value = "${ replace("xxxABBAyyy", "/(?:.*)(ABBA)(?:.*)/", "$1") }"
}
// string doesn't contain ABBA = result is original string
output "no_match" {
  value = "${ replace("xxxBABAyyy", "/(?:.*)(ABBA)(?:.*)/", "$1")}"
}
// string contains ABBA (ingorecase) = result is AbBA
output "equals_ignorecase" {
  value = "${ replace("xxxAbBAyyy", "/(?:.*)((?i)ABBA)(?:.*)/", "$1")}"
}

An output of terraform apply is:

Outputs:

equals_ignorecase = AbBA
match = ABBA
no_match = xxxBABAyyy
2

Something that makes sense reading, IMHO:

locals {
  is_tmp = can(regex("tmp", terraform.workspace))
}

This works because the regex function will raise an error if no matches are found.

Bonus: since Terraform 1.3.x, there are the new startswith and endswith functions that can be handy in a good amount of cases.

0

In terraform 0.12.7, we now have regex . This may help simplify some code and make it readable to some (perhaps?)

> regex("[a-z]+", "53453453.345345aaabbbccc23454")
aaabbbccc
1
  • 5
    This would throw an error if no match is found. Using regexall() with length(regexall()) > 0 check is preferred to keep it graceful. Example shared by @isaacegglestone here stackoverflow.com/a/58193941/636762
    – Rakib
    Commented May 16, 2020 at 15:58
0

I use this way to check if bucket name start with test-tmp eg. test-tmp, test-tmp-app1, test-tmp-db1 etc..

is_test_bucket = can(regex("^(test-tmp){1}($|-{1}.*$)", var.bucket_name))
0

As of 1.5.0, terraform supports the strcontains method to do this.

Ref: https://developer.hashicorp.com/terraform/language/functions/strcontains

1
  • 1
    While this link may answer the question, it is better to include the essential parts of the answer here and provide the link for reference. Link-only answers can become invalid if the linked page changes. - From Review Commented Aug 18, 2023 at 12:40

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