78

I am seriously going crazy over this and I've already spent an unproportionate amount of time on trying to figure out what's going on here. So please give me a hand =)

I need to do some RegExp matching of strings in JavaScript. Unfortunately it behaves very strangely. This code:

var rx = /(cat|dog)/gi;
var w = new Array("I have a cat and a dog too.", "There once was a dog and a cat.", "I have a cat and a dog too.", "There once was a dog and a cat.","I have a cat and a dog too.", "There once was a dog and a cat.","I have a cat and a dog too.", "There once was a dog and a cat.","I have a cat and a dog too.", "There once was a dog and a cat.","I have a cat and a dog too.", "There once was a dog and a cat.","I have a cat and a dog too.", "There once was a dog and a cat.");

for (var i in w) {
    var m = null;
    m = rx.exec(w[i]);
    if(m){
        document.writeln("<pre>" + i + "\nINPUT: " + w[i] + "\nMATCHES: " + m.slice(1) + "</pre>");
    }else{
        document.writeln("<pre>" + i + "\n'" + w[i] + "' FAILED.</pre>");
    }
}

Returns "cat" and "dog" for the first two elements, as it should be, but then some exec()-calls start returning null. I don't understand why.

I posted a Fiddle here, where you can run and edit the code.

And so far I've tried this in Chrome and Firefox.

Cheers!

/Christofer

  • it fails only on a "I have a cat and a dog too.", it seems – SilentGhost Jan 18 '11 at 13:48
  • exec returns null if a match fails by design, so for some reason it fails to match. – Martin Jespersen Jan 18 '11 at 13:49
70

Oh, here it is. Because you're defining your regex global, it matches first cat, and on the second pass of the loop dog. So, basically you just need to reset your regex (it's internal pointer) as well. Cf. this:

var w = new Array("I have a cat and a dog too.", "I have a cat and a dog too.", "I have a cat and a dog too.", "I have a cat and a dog too.");

for (var i in w) {
    var rx = /(cat|dog)/gi;
    var m = null;
    m = rx.exec(w[i]);
    if(m){
        document.writeln("<p>" + i + "<br/>INPUT: " + w[i] + "<br/>MATCHES: " + w[i].length + "</p>");
    }else{
        document.writeln("<p><b>" + i + "<br/>'" + w[i] + "' FAILED.</b><br/>" + w[i].length + "</p>");
    }
    document.writeln(m);
}
  • there we have it, i was too slow :) – Martin Jespersen Jan 18 '11 at 13:53
  • ah sweet! it would have taken me a while to figure that one out. thanks! – cpak Jan 18 '11 at 13:57
  • This saved me a loooot of time. Thanks so much! – Thomas Johansen Jan 5 '17 at 10:32
  • This problem makes me doubt life. – GZ Xue Jul 20 '18 at 3:52
  • I feel like I should just give my paycheck back – cgatian Nov 2 '18 at 11:33
66

The regex object has a property lastIndex which is updated when you run exec. So when you exec the regex on e.g. "I have a cat and a dog too.", lastIndex is set to 12. The next time you run exec on the same regex object, it starts looking from index 12. So you have to reset the lastIndex property between each run.

  • Bah, this site is too fast for me. +1 for SilentGhost :-) – Frode Jan 18 '11 at 13:59
  • 8
    Thanks for the explanation! It helps a lot by setting myRe.lastIndex = 0; for subsequent use. – Antony Jan 20 '13 at 1:52
  • 1
    Wow, thanks so much for the hint with the lastIndex, that was really driving me crazy! – dave0688 Feb 5 '18 at 9:44
  • 1
    I think this should be the correct answer because it follows the best practice of reusing the same regex object – smurtagh Mar 18 '19 at 20:17
  • Agree this should be the correct answer. It reuses the same regex object and also explains the internal mechanics. OP should consider changing. – Sean Coley Dec 16 '19 at 16:30
27

Two things:

  1. The mentioned need of reset when using the g (global) flag. To solve this I recommed simply assign 0 to the lastIndex member of the RegExp object. This have better performance than destroy-and-recreate.
  2. Be careful when use in keyword in order to walk an Array object, because can lead to unexpected results with some libs. Sometimes you should check with somethign like isNaN(i), or if you know it don't have holes, use the classic for loop.

The code can be:

var rx = /(cat|dog)/gi;
w = ["I have a cat and a dog too.", "There once was a dog and a cat.", "I have a cat and a dog too.", "There once was a dog and a cat.","I have a cat and a dog too.", "There once was a dog and a cat.","I have a cat and a dog too.", "There once was a dog and a cat.","I have a cat and a dog too.", "There once was a dog and a cat.","I have a cat and a dog too.", "There once was a dog and a cat.","I have a cat and a dog too.", "There once was a dog and a cat."];

for (var i in w)
 if(!isNaN(i))        // Optional, check it is an element if Array could have some odd members.
  {
   var m = null;
   m = rx.exec(w[i]); // Run
   rx.lastIndex = 0;  // Reset
   if(m)
    {
     document.writeln("<pre>" + i + "\nINPUT: " + w[i] + "\nMATCHES: " + m.slice(1) + "</pre>");
    } else {
     document.writeln("<pre>" + i + "\n'" + w[i] + "' FAILED.</pre>");
    }
  }
  • 1
    This should be the correct answer. Setting rx.lastIndex = 0 is much better than re-creating the RegEx object inside the loop. – Minoru Sep 25 '19 at 19:27
4

I had a similar problem using /g only, and the proposed solution here did not work for me in FireFox 3.6.8. I got my script working with

var myRegex = new RegExp("my string", "g");

I'm adding this in case someone else has the same problem I did with the above solution.

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