8

I have a page with multiple charts in a grid-like format as follows:

[ ] [ ] [ ] [ ]
[ ] [ ] [ ] [ ]
[ ] [ ] [ ] [ ]
[ ] [ ] [ ] [ ]
[ ] [ ] [ ] [ ]

Each chart is displayed in a wrapper with float:left and the div the charts are in has overflow: auto. This gives the desired layout wrapping the charts to screen width.

The problem I have is that in print mode this only prints one page and loses the rest (also first page is blank). I have read a little bit and understand the solution in most cases is to turn apply float:none which solves the above problems... But I lose the grid format and I want more than one column of charts on the printed page.

How can I fix this?

I am using a print style sheet but here are the screen styles:

.chartSpace  /* surrounds all charts */
{
    padding-top: 20px;
    width: auto;
    overflow: auto;
}

.chartWrapper /* wrapper for each chart */
{
    float: left;
    padding: 0 20px 0 0;
}
  • Why are you using overflow: auto;? Overflow: hidden; will cause a div to contain floated child elements. Maybe that's worth a shot – roborourke Jan 23 '09 at 11:59
  • Sounds like a browser bug - which browser is it that does this? – bobince Jan 23 '09 at 11:59
  • Thanks for the tip Sancho, I will bear it in mind. It's still doing the same thing unfortunately. The browser is IE 7. Interestingly in Mozilla it seems the same. – KWorrall Jan 23 '09 at 14:25
  • Are the .chartWrapper elements inside of anything? A floated element will not cause a page break, so if .chartWrappers are all inside a floated column or something it won't work. – willoller Jan 23 '09 at 22:21
8

Float does not work well in print css, so remove the floats or override them with float: none and use inline-block instead:

.chartWrapper {
    float: none;
    display: inline-block;
    vertical-align: top;
    padding: 0 20px 0 0;
}
2

I don't know if you really need the float: left for other things, but you could try:

/* wrapper for each chart */
.chartWrapper { display: inline; padding: 0 20px 0 0; }

That would also position the divs next to each other and it doesn't do strange things to the flow of the document.

  • display: inline does not seem a good idea. Inline elements don't generate a block container. display: inline-block is more reasonable. – Oriol Apr 18 '16 at 19:56
1

In the past I had the same issue. Ever since I kept an eye open for solutions. My favorite method is using the <table> element. And build a different page for printing. Loads of work but in the end worth it. Since I needed it for billing. And my customers really could not receive a ugly bill.

Example:

<table style="width: 100%;">
  <tr>
    <td>Alek Rasschaert</td>
    <td style="width: 60%"></td>
    <td>Mobile Express</td>
  </tr>
  <tr>
    <td>Diestsesteenweg 93</td>
    <td style="width: 60%"></td>
    <td>Diestsesteenweg 93</td>
  </tr>
  <tr>
    <td>3010 Kessel-Lo</td>
    <td style="width: 60%"></td>
    <td>3010 Kessel-Lo</td>
  </tr>
</table>
  • 1
    Previously I said it didn't work, sorry for that...for rendering charts (in my case google charts from google visualization API) I think this is the only possible solution. I give you thumbs up for this :) – Marco Oct 13 '16 at 10:07
0

This is a problem I have battled with on a project and unfortunately I have found no straightforward answer. Jeroens answer didn't work for me as I was also displaying some caption text under each image hence I needed display:block behaviour. The approach I ended up taking is as follows:

  • Firstly I made an assumption that the user will be printing on A4 paper in portrait mode. I included this in a message box on the page ('for best results please print in portrait mode...etc) which is hidden when printing.
  • Secondly, you can still float your charts but you should insert a clearing div after each row. (I know this messes up the layout when printing in landscape mode hence my first point above).

[][][][]
------- clearing div
[][][][]
------- clearing div
[][][][]
etc...

  • I also went one step further and inserted a page-breaking div after enough rows to fill an A4 page (how many depends on your image size).

I used the following styles for this:

div.pageBreak {
    page-break-after: always;
    visibility:hidden;
    height:1px !important;
    margin:0;
}

Finally, do lots of cross-browser testing! I found I had to make the images quite small for the same grid layout to fit on one page across the browsers. This is due to the differences in the default page margins that the different browsers employ.

Hope this helps.

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