61

I want to use Spring Security for JWT authentication. But it comes with default authentication. I am trying to disable it, but the old approach of doing this - disabling it through application.properties - is deprecated in 2.0.

This is what I tried:

@Configuration
public class StackWebSecurityConfigurerAdapter extends WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter {

    @Override
    protected void configure(HttpSecurity http) throws Exception {
        http.httpBasic().disable();
        // http.authorizeRequests().anyRequest().permitAll(); // Also doesn't work.
    }
}

How can I simply disable basic security?

UPDATE
It might be nice to know that I am not using web mvc but web flux.

Screenshot:
Basic login form

8
  • Did you try to exclude the package as you can see here
    – Novy
    Commented Nov 13, 2017 at 21:30
  • @Y.Colin Yes I tried that. I can only disable it by removing the whole dependency..
    – Jan Wytze
    Commented Nov 13, 2017 at 21:35
  • Could you explain a bit more? What is now secured that wasn't previously? What is your security configuration? Could you provide an example of request+response? Commented Nov 14, 2017 at 8:28
  • @BrianClozel At the moment it is just an empty application, I just want to use spring security without the basic authentication. You can duplicate this by creating a spring boot 2.0 web application and use @EnableWebFlux.
    – Jan Wytze
    Commented Nov 14, 2017 at 17:20
  • Adding @EnableWebFlux effectively disables all the WebFlux auto-configuration. Is that what you intend to do? Commented Nov 14, 2017 at 17:22

18 Answers 18

71

According to the new updates in Spring 2.0, if Spring Security is on the classpath, Spring Boot will add @EnableWebSecurity.So adding entries to the application.properties ain't gonna work (i.e it is no longer customizable that way). For more information visit the official website Security changes in Spring Boot 2.0

Albeit not sure about your requirement exactly, I could think of one workaround like the following:-

@Configuration
@EnableWebSecurity
public class SecurityConfiguration  extends WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter{
    @Override
    protected void configure(HttpSecurity http) throws Exception{
        http.authorizeRequests().antMatchers("/").permitAll();
    }
}

Hope this helps.

8
  • 1
    This question is about configuring security in Spring Boot for Spring WebFlux; @EnableWebSecurity is for Spring MVC. Commented Dec 17, 2018 at 20:34
  • 1
    @BrianClozel when I answered to this question, this update about WebFlux was not there I guess.
    – Sen
    Commented Dec 19, 2018 at 18:55
  • BrianClozel, how do disable @EnableWebSecurity. It seems to be there by default and prevents my application from starting up when I define reactive spring security
    – DBS
    Commented Mar 28, 2019 at 16:22
  • 2
    IMO this really isn't any better than just removing the spring security dependency from the class path. It would be better if the "http.httpBasic().disable().formLogin().disable();" actually worked. The documentation says "Spring Boot now has a single behavior that backs off as soon as you add your own WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter." but that seems to be a false statement. I have a WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter as well as "http.httpBasic().disable().formLogin().disable();" and I still get that stupid spring login page. its infuriating.
    – peekay
    Commented Apr 8, 2019 at 22:17
  • @peekay "Spring Boot now has a single behavior that backs off as soon as you add your own WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter." - this statement is entire true. Any auto configuration feature of Spring boot is non-invasive, i.e. it will back away once you add your own configuration. Disabling formLogin() doesn't let you access endpoints without userid, password, it rather disables/removes the form based authentication functionality.docs.spring.io/spring-security/site/docs/4.2.11.RELEASE/apidocs/…
    – Sen
    Commented Apr 9, 2019 at 14:40
48

From Spring Boot 2.1 on, if you include spring-boot-actuator, it does not suffice anymore to only exclude SecurityAutoconfiguration, you also need to exclude ManagementWebSecurityAutoConfiguration, like so:

@SpringBootApplication(exclude = { SecurityAutoConfiguration.class, ManagementWebSecurityAutoConfiguration.class })
4
  • Thanks! The suggestion in this answer worked, depending of course on the Spring Boot version (in my case 2.1.5).
    – octy
    Commented May 17, 2019 at 17:45
  • 2
    As long as I am using the @EnableWebSecurity annotation, this answer does not work for me (Spring Boot 2.1.5, spring-security-web 4.2.3.RELEASE). Did you have to do anything else?
    – Brandon
    Commented May 21, 2019 at 13:32
  • 2
    If you want to exclude AutoConfiguration I believe you will not be able to use @EnableWebSecurity and you will need to configure the required spring security beans yourself as with plain Spring/without Spring boot. Commented May 22, 2019 at 8:25
  • The easiest way. Thank you Commented Jul 18, 2019 at 9:33
25

According to the reference documentation, the Security configuration for allowing all requests with WebFlux should look like this:

import org.springframework.context.annotation.Bean;
import org.springframework.context.annotation.Configuration;
import org.springframework.security.config.web.server.ServerHttpSecurity;
import org.springframework.security.web.server.SecurityWebFilterChain;

@Configuration
public class SecurityConfig {

    @Bean
    public SecurityWebFilterChain springSecurityFilterChain(ServerHttpSecurity http) {
        http.authorizeExchange().anyExchange().permitAll();
        return http.build();
    }
}
6
  • Thank! Everything configured in the configuration that extended WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter didn't seem to do anything. But when removing @EnableWebSecurity and using this configuration it finally works.
    – Jan Wytze
    Commented Nov 14, 2017 at 18:00
  • 1
    @EnableWebSecurity is for Spring MVC only. @EnableWebFluxSecurity is automatically applied if you've got spring security on classpath. See github.com/spring-projects/spring-boot/wiki/… for more information Commented Nov 14, 2017 at 18:11
  • I have to explicitly mention @EnableWebFluxSecurity to SecurityConfig. Commented Aug 10, 2018 at 1:14
  • 9
    This does not work as it now complains about Missing Bean "ServerHttpSecurity " Commented Dec 13, 2018 at 4:36
  • 1
    I have tried it with spring boot 2.2.0 ServerHttpSecurity' could not be found Commented Nov 5, 2019 at 14:58
19

This worked for me:

@Configuration
public class SecurityConfig  extends WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter {

    @Override
    protected void configure(HttpSecurity http) throws Exception {
        http.csrf().disable().authorizeRequests().anyRequest().permitAll();
    }
}
2
17

You can add/modify the following to your Application class:

@SpringBootApplication(exclude = { SecurityAutoConfiguration.class })
public class MyApplication {

}
1
  • thanks this worked for me :) I just need to disable login so I could test the api functionality Commented Feb 16, 2023 at 16:52
7

Adding some fresh answer, I assume all use actuator, if not I'd bet one class exclusion should be sufficient, I managed to disable through properties:

spring:
  autoconfigure:
    exclude: ${spring.autoconfigure.sac}, ${spring.autoconfigure.mwsas}
    sac: org.springframework.boot.autoconfigure.security.servlet.SecurityAutoConfiguration
    mwsas: org.springframework.boot.actuate.autoconfigure.security.servlet.ManagementWebSecurityAutoConfiguration

I've referenced two auto-config classes through property to keep the length intact (note that IntelliJ Ultimate will cry if you reference it like that as it has no clue what are these placeholder values and if they are actually legit classes, so inline if that annoys you).

Application however does not fail to start as claimed by:

https://www.baeldung.com/spring-boot-security-autoconfiguration

if you just disable SecurityAutoConfiguration

If it did work, you will stop seeing auto generated password and it is a little bit less confusing than the accepted answer, as dev reading the log won't get confused by generated password for basic auth while security allows all.

Why just disabling main auto config class isn't enough is because of this fella:

@Configuration
class ManagementWebSecurityConfigurerAdapter extends WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter {

    @Override
    protected void configure(HttpSecurity http) throws Exception {
        http.authorizeRequests()
                .requestMatchers(
                        EndpointRequest.to(HealthEndpoint.class, InfoEndpoint.class))
                .permitAll().anyRequest().authenticated().and().formLogin().and()
                .httpBasic();
    }

}

There was tons of work made to split actuator and security config which confused us all, now its more straightforward but artifacts like these still exist. Spring devs will correct me if I am wrong :-).

2
  • 1
    Ohh man this is the single answer between tons not worked suggestions. This answer definitely should be at the top of the thread. Thanks a lot!
    – Speise
    Commented May 22, 2020 at 19:22
  • For WebFlux, exclude: org.springframework.boot.autoconfigure.security.reactive.ReactiveSecurityAutoConfiguration and org.springframework.boot.actuate.autoconfigure.security.reactive.ReactiveManagementWebSecurityAutoConfiguration
    – Litash
    Commented Mar 1, 2021 at 5:58
3

I have leveraged @ConditionalOnProperty to load the following SecurityConfig.java class if I set spring.security.enabled property to false in my application.yml to disable spring security and it works like a charm.

@ConditionalOnProperty(name = "spring.security.enabled", havingValue = "false")
@Configuration
@EnableWebSecurity
public class SecurityConfig extends WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter {

    @Override
    protected void configure(HttpSecurity http) throws Exception {
        http.csrf().disable()
            .authorizeRequests().antMatchers("/").permitAll();
    }
}
2

If anyone is struggling with this in a WebFlux based application, or a Spring Cloud Gateway application, the below worked for me:

@EnableWebFluxSecurity
public class InsecurityConfiguration {
    // @formatter:off
    @Bean
    public SecurityWebFilterChain springSecurityFilterChain(ServerHttpSecurity http) {
         http
              .authorizeExchange()
                   .anyExchange().permitAll();
         return http.build();
    }
}
1
  • This solution worked for me when trying to disable all security for spring cloud gateway applications. Commented Nov 18, 2021 at 11:18
2

To disable default security for Spring Boot Reactive Web applications, use the following excludes when you have actuator also in the classpath.

@SpringBootApplication(exclude = {ReactiveSecurityAutoConfiguration.class, ReactiveManagementWebSecurityAutoConfiguration.class })
1
  • If you are using reactor then this is the way to disable auth. Commented May 25, 2022 at 21:05
1

I think what you are looking for is to override the default authentication entry point which is set to BasicAuthenticationEntryPoint.

This entrypoint adds the

"WWW-Authenticate": "Basic realm=..."

header that tells your browser to use Basic Auth.

1
  • By using firefox I don't get the header, but via a request tool I do get it.
    – Jan Wytze
    Commented Nov 14, 2017 at 17:39
1

If you're extending WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter, you can pass in true to the super constructor to disable the defaults.
You may need to provide other beans if you do this.

    /**
     * Creates an instance which allows specifying if the default configuration should be
     * enabled. Disabling the default configuration should be considered more advanced
     * usage as it requires more understanding of how the framework is implemented.
     *
     * @param disableDefaults true if the default configuration should be disabled, else
     * false
     */
    protected WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter(boolean disableDefaults) {
        this.disableDefaults = disableDefaults;
    }

If you want to disable it just for testing purposes - Rather than completely disabling the auto-configuration, I create an "InsecurityConfiguration" in addition to "SecurityConfiguration", and activate it with either a Spring Profile or Property value.

Technically security is still configured, but wide open.

@Configuration
@ConditionalOnProperty(prefix = "security", value = "disabled", havingValue = "true")
public class InsecurityConfiguration extends WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter {

    private final static Logger log = LoggerFactory.getLogger(InsecurityConfiguration.class);

    @Override
    protected void configure(HttpSecurity http) throws Exception {
        log.warn("configuring insecure HttpSecurity");
        http.authorizeRequests().anyRequest().permitAll();
    }

    @Override
    public void configure(WebSecurity web) throws Exception {
        log.warn("configuring insecure WebSecurity");
        web.ignoring().antMatchers("/**");
    }

}

Note This is for mvc, not webflux. For Webflux you should create a SecurityWebFilterChain like Bryan mentioned.

This is how I generally disable basic auth in webflux, when using JWT -

    @Bean
    public SecurityWebFilterChain configure(ServerHttpSecurity http) {

        http
        .authorizeExchange().anyExchange().authenticated().and()
            .httpBasic().disable()
            .formLogin().disable()
            .logout().disable()
            .oauth2ResourceServer()
            .jwt()
            .and()
                .and().exceptionHandling().accessDeniedHandler(problemSupport);
        return http.build();
    }
2
  • Not sure why this was marked down. It would be helpful to provide feedback if you mark something down please.
    – Jeremy
    Commented Dec 15, 2019 at 20:39
  • overriding configure method in web security adapter is enough to stop default login page @Override protected void configure(HttpSecurity http) throws Exception { log.warn("configuring insecure HttpSecurity"); http.authorizeRequests().anyRequest().permitAll(); } Commented Mar 18, 2020 at 17:24
1

Only properties - works for me (sb2 - 2022):

spring:
  autoconfigure:
    exclude:
      - org.springframework.boot.autoconfigure.security.servlet.SecurityAutoConfiguration
      - org.springframework.boot.actuate.autoconfigure.security.servlet.ManagementWebSecurityAutoConfiguration
1
  • 1
    Your answer could be improved with additional supporting information. Please edit to add further details, such as citations or documentation, so that others can confirm that your answer is correct. You can find more information on how to write good answers in the help center.
    – Community Bot
    Commented Jun 30, 2022 at 17:29
1

Simple solution for Spring Boot 2.6

@SpringBootApplication(exclude = {SecurityAutoConfiguration.class, ManagementWebSecurityAutoConfiguration.class, UserDetailsServiceAutoConfiguration.class})
0

In Spring boot 2, there is no way to disable basic authentication by application.properties file. But the only thing is use annotation

@EnableAutoConfiguration(exclude = {SecurityAutoConfiguration.class})

in the main class. It works

1
  • I was unable to get this to work. (Spring Boot 2.1.5, spring-security-web 4.2.3.RELEASE, spring-boot-starter-actuator). Did you have to do anything else?
    – Brandon
    Commented May 21, 2019 at 13:34
0

The problem is with org.springframework.security.web.server.authorization.ExceptionTranslationWebFilter

it has private ServerAuthenticationEntryPoint authenticationEntryPoint = new HttpBasicServerAuthenticationEntryPoint();

so to fix it during ServerHttpSecurity initialization add:

http.exceptionHandling().authenticationEntryPoint(HttpStatusServerEntryPoint(HttpStatus.FORBIDDEN))

Looks like vanilla (servlet) spring uses org.springframework.security.config.annotation.web.configurers.ExceptionHandlingConfigurer#createDefaultEntryPoint

private AuthenticationEntryPoint createDefaultEntryPoint(H http) {
        if (this.defaultEntryPointMappings.isEmpty()) {
            return new Http403ForbiddenEntryPoint();
        }
        if (this.defaultEntryPointMappings.size() == 1) {
            return this.defaultEntryPointMappings.values().iterator().next();
        }
        DelegatingAuthenticationEntryPoint entryPoint = new DelegatingAuthenticationEntryPoint(
                this.defaultEntryPointMappings);
        entryPoint.setDefaultEntryPoint(this.defaultEntryPointMappings.values().iterator()
                .next());
        return entryPoint;
    }

Side note: mutable fields in builder style beans (like ExceptionTranslationWebFilter) make spring code hard to debug (too magic configuration as well)

0

You should add @EnableWebSecurity to enable a custom security configuration. After that simply disable the form login

@Configuration
@EnableWebSecurity
public class StackWebSecurityConfigurerAdapter extends 
WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter {
 @Override
 protected void configure(HttpSecurity http) throws Exception {
    http.formLogin().disable();
 }

}

0

This worked for me

@SpringBootApplication(exclude = {UserDetailsServiceAutoConfiguration.class})
class SpringApplication{
 ...
}
0

Instead of disabling the entire Security autoconfiguration, you can also keep it but feed it a no-op SecurityFilterChain/SecurityWebFilterChain object. Here's a reactive example:

    @Bean
    public SecurityWebFilterChain noSecurityFilterChain() {
        return new MatcherSecurityWebFilterChain(
                // it could just as well be ServerWebExchangeMatcher.MatchResult.match()
                exchange -> ServerWebExchangeMatcher.MatchResult.notMatch(),
                // there's a check against empty lists so I have to pass some lambda
                List.of((e, c) -> c.filter(e)));
    }

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