4

So I have a bunch of regexes and I try to see if they match with another string using this If statement:

if(samplestring.match(regex1)){ 
 console.log("regex1");
} else  if(samplestring.match(regex2)){     
 console.log("regex2");
} else  if(samplestring.match(regex3)){
 console.log("regex3");
}

But as soon as I need to use more regexes this gets quite ugly so I want to use a switch case statement like this:

switch(samplestring){
case samplestring.match(regex1): console.log("regex1");
case samplestring.match(regex2): console.log("regex2");
case samplestring.match(regex3): console.log("regex3");
}

The problem is it doesn't work like I did it in the example above. Any Ideas on how it could work like that?

3
  • 1
    I think you skipped break. – kyun Nov 14 '17 at 8:43
  • Every case that comes after the one that was matched will be executed, unless the browser reads the break keyword. – barbarossa Nov 14 '17 at 8:49
  • i added the break keyword but it still doesnt work – J.Doe Nov 14 '17 at 8:49
9

You need to use a different check, not with String#match, that returns an array or null which is not usable with strict comparison like in a switch statement.

You may use RegExp#test and check with true:

var regex1 = /a/,
    regex2 = /b/,
    regex3 = /c/,
    samplestring = 'b';

switch (true) {
    case regex1.test(samplestring):
        console.log("regex1");
        break;
    case regex2.test(samplestring):
        console.log("regex2");
        break;
    case regex3.test(samplestring):
        console.log("regex3");
        break;
}

3
  • this works but i read somewhere that this isnt a very clean method of doing a switch case statement, is this true? – J.Doe Nov 14 '17 at 8:51
  • it's a clean pattern beside that it works as intended. – Nina Scholz Nov 14 '17 at 8:53
  • Genius! Thank you, works like a charm – Kia Kaha Jul 13 at 5:52
-1
switch (samplestring) {
  case samplestring.match(regex1):
    console.log("regex1");
    break;
  case samplestring.match(regex2):
    console.log("regex2");
    break;
  case samplestring.match(regex3):
    console.log("regex3");
    break;
}

Try to add break;

2
  • 1
    Have you even tried this? It does not work! Missing breaks is not the sole problem. – Peter B Nov 14 '17 at 8:47
  • switch works with a strict comparer, so an array is never be strict equal to a string, or null is never strict equal to a string. – Nina Scholz Nov 14 '17 at 8:58

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.