163

I'm checking a variable, say foo, for equality to a number of values. For example,

if( foo == 1 || foo == 3 || foo == 12 ) {
    // ...
}

The point is that it is rather much code for such a trivial task. I came up with the following:

if( foo in {1: 1, 3: 1, 12: 1} ) {
    // ...
}

but also this does not completely appeal to me, because I have to give redundant values to the items in the object.

Does anyone know a decent way of doing an equality check against multiple values?

4
  • I think the larger context needs to be involved when deciding something like this, because it's important to know why you're making such comparisons.
    – Pointy
    Jan 18 '11 at 19:30
  • Well, in a game I'm creating I'm checking keyboard codes so as to decide what function should be called. In different browsers, a key has different key codes appearently, hence the need to compare with multiple values.
    – pimvdb
    Jan 18 '11 at 19:32
  • 1
    check performance test for multiple methods, logical operator wins runkit.com/pramendra/58cad911146c1c00147f8d8d Mar 16 '17 at 19:04
  • 1
    This is a common duplicate target for questions asking why variable === value1 || value2 isn’t working. For those wondering why: || and && operate with short-circuit evaluation; each operand is either truthy or falsy. x === 1 || 2 means (x === 1) || (2) and is either true or 2, since || results in the first truthy or the last falsy operand, and x === "a" || "b" is either true or "b". Since true, 2, and "b" are all truthy, putting them in an if condition is equivalent to if(true). Just use [ "a", "b" ].includes(x). Aug 24 at 17:56

15 Answers 15

207

You could use an array and indexOf:

if ([1,3,12].indexOf(foo) > -1)
4
  • 1
    I like this one. It would even be possible to create a 'contains' function through prototype I guess, so as to eliminate the use of > -1.
    – pimvdb
    Jan 18 '11 at 19:30
  • 1
    @pimvdb: Note that you might need your own implementation as indexOf is only available since ECMAScript 5th edition.
    – Gumbo
    Jan 18 '11 at 19:34
  • Is '>' somehow better than '!=='? May 25 '20 at 3:44
  • 1
    You can use ~ operator instead of > -1: if ( ~[...].indexOf(foo) ) { ... }
    – Vahid
    Nov 21 '20 at 8:22
165

In ECMA2016 you can use the includes method. It's the cleanest way I've seen. (Supported by all major browsers)

if([1,3,12].includes(foo)) {
    // ...
}
3
  • 5
    For variables if([a,b,c].includes(foo)) or strings if(['a','b','c'].includes(foo)) Mar 1 '17 at 22:12
  • for variables => if([a,b,c].includes(foo)) because Quotation mark will make it string. @HastigZusammenstellen Feb 28 '19 at 6:05
  • 6
    @BinodShrestha I think that's what I wrote, unless I'm missing something. "For variables.. or strings..." Feb 28 '19 at 14:20
15

Using the answers provided, I ended up with the following:

Object.prototype.in = function() {
    for(var i=0; i<arguments.length; i++)
       if(arguments[i] == this) return true;
    return false;
}

It can be called like:

if(foo.in(1, 3, 12)) {
    // ...
}

Edit: I came across this 'trick' lately which is useful if the values are strings and do not contain special characters. For special characters is becomes ugly due to escaping and is also more error-prone due to that.

/foo|bar|something/.test(str);

To be more precise, this will check the exact string, but then again is more complicated for a simple equality test:

/^(foo|bar|something)$/.test(str);
9
  • 7
    Goodness! I'm astounded that works — in is a keyword in Javascript. For example, running function in() {}; in() results in a syntax error, at least in Firefox, and I'm not sure why your code doesn't. :-)
    – Ben Blank
    Feb 4 '11 at 18:35
  • 7
    Also, it's often considered bad practice to extend Object.prototype, as it affects for (foo in bar) in unfortunate ways. Perhaps change it to function contains(obj) { for (var i = 1; i < arguments.length; i++) if (arguments[i] === obj) return true; return false; } and pass the the object as an argument?
    – Ben Blank
    Feb 4 '11 at 18:38
  • 4
    Extending the Object.prototype is an anti-pattern and shouldn't be used. Use a function instead.
    – Vernon
    Dec 14 '16 at 10:11
  • 1
    As mentioned above extending Object.prototype this way has serious disadvantages and can lead to many bugs. If you really do want to extend Object.prototype always do it via Object.defineProperty without setting enumerable in descriptor. Mar 7 '19 at 0:59
  • 2
    @BenBlank - Just FYI, using a keyword as a literal property name became valid in the 5th edition spec (Dec 2009), which is why x.in() works. Prior to the 5th edition you would have had to use a computed property name (x["in"]()). Nov 18 '20 at 14:51
9

You can write if(foo in L(10,20,30)) if you define L to be

var L = function()
{
    var obj = {};
    for(var i=0; i<arguments.length; i++)
        obj[arguments[i]] = null;

    return obj;
};
1
  • 2
    I think it is prudent to remark that prototype functions are also 'in' an array/object - so if there is a function 'remove' in an array/object's prototype, it will always return true if you code 'remove' in L(1, 3, 12), although you didn't specify 'remove' to be put in the list.
    – pimvdb
    Jan 20 '11 at 10:19
9

Now you may have a better solution to resolve this scenario, but other way which i preferred.

const arr = [1,3,12]
if( arr.includes(foo)) { // it will return true if you `foo` is one of array values else false
  // code here    
}

I preferred above solution over the indexOf check where you need to check index as well.

includes docs

if ( arr.indexOf( foo ) !== -1 ) { }
8

This is easily extendable and readable:

switch (foo) {
    case 1:
    case 3:
    case 12:
        // ...
        break

    case 4:
    case 5:
    case 6:
        // something else
        break
}

But not necessarily easier :)

2
  • I actually used this method as I wanted to put a comment next to each value to describe what the value related to, this was the most readable way to achieve it.
    – pholcroft
    Jun 15 '18 at 8:46
  • @pholcroft if you need to describe what each value relates to you should create an enum, or class, and write your properties to have descriptive names.
    – red_dorian
    Jun 22 '18 at 10:57
7
var a = [1,2,3];

if ( a.indexOf( 1 ) !== -1 ) { }

Note that indexOf is not in the core ECMAScript. You'll need to have a snippet for IE and possibly other browsers that dont support Array.prototype.indexOf.

if (!Array.prototype.indexOf)
{
  Array.prototype.indexOf = function(searchElement /*, fromIndex */)
  {
    "use strict";

    if (this === void 0 || this === null)
      throw new TypeError();

    var t = Object(this);
    var len = t.length >>> 0;
    if (len === 0)
      return -1;

    var n = 0;
    if (arguments.length > 0)
    {
      n = Number(arguments[1]);
      if (n !== n)
        n = 0;
      else if (n !== 0 && n !== (1 / 0) && n !== -(1 / 0))
        n = (n > 0 || -1) * Math.floor(Math.abs(n));
    }

    if (n >= len)
      return -1;

    var k = n >= 0
          ? n
          : Math.max(len - Math.abs(n), 0);

    for (; k < len; k++)
    {
      if (k in t && t[k] === searchElement)
        return k;
    }
    return -1;
  };
}
3
3

Also, since the values against which you're checking the result are all unique you can use the Set.prototype.has() as well.

var valid = [1, 3, 12];
var goodFoo = 3;
var badFoo = 55;

// Test
console.log( new Set(valid).has(goodFoo) );
console.log( new Set(valid).has(badFoo) );

1

I liked the accepted answer, but thought it would be neat to enable it to take arrays as well, so I expanded it to this:

Object.prototype.isin = function() {
    for(var i = arguments.length; i--;) {
        var a = arguments[i];
        if(a.constructor === Array) {
            for(var j = a.length; j--;)
                if(a[j] == this) return true;
        }
        else if(a == this) return true;
    }
    return false;
}

var lucky = 7,
    more = [7, 11, 42];
lucky.isin(2, 3, 5, 8, more) //true

You can remove type coercion by changing == to ===.

1

If you have access to Underscore, you can use the following:

if (_.contains([1, 3, 12], foo)) {
  // ...
}

contains used to work in Lodash as well (prior to V4), now you have to use includes

if (_.includes([1, 3, 12], foo)) {
  handleYellowFruit();
}
1

This is a little helper arrow function:

const letters = ['A', 'B', 'C', 'D'];

function checkInList(arr, val) {
  return arr.some(arrVal => val === arrVal);
}

checkInList(letters, 'E');   // false
checkInList(letters, 'A');   // true

More info here...

2
  • Very good approach: starting from your idea you can also do it without a helper funcion: const valToCheck = 'E'; const check = ['A', 'B', 'C', 'D'].some(option => option === valToCheck); // false Sep 18 '19 at 8:41
  • But once I've started tweaking the code I have found that includes becomes the better option, as in @alister's answer: const valToCheck = 'E'; const check = ['A', 'B', 'C', 'D'].includes(valToCheck); // false Sep 18 '19 at 8:51
0

I simply used jQuery inArray function and an array of values to accomplish this:

myArr = ["A", "B", "C", "C-"];

var test = $.inArray("C", myArr)  
// returns index of 2 returns -1 if not in array

if(test >= 0) // true
0

For a larger list of values that you compare with often, it is likely more optimal to first construct a Set and use Set#has for a constant time check rather than Array#includes which runs in linear time.

const values = new Set([1, 2, 12]);
if(values.has(foo)){
   // do something
}
0

Using the ES6 syntax you can do:

Object.prototype.in = function (...args) {
  return args.includes(this.valueOf());
}

which incidentally also checks for deep equality. The valueOf() method is needed as this is an object.

-6

For posterity you might want to use regular expressions as an alternative. Pretty good browser support as well (ref. https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/String/match#Browser_compatibility)

Try this

if (foo.toString().match(/^(1|3|12)$/)) {
    document.write('Regex me IN<br>');
} else {
    document.write('Regex me OUT<br>');
}

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