Since this is not a question directly covered here, thought best I ask and answer it.

I had an issue where I wanted to add a node name to a list only if the same node doesn't already exist. The array was built using:

push (@fin_nodes, [$node, $hindex, $e->{$hip}->{FREQ}]);

So given when given array (@fin_nodes) that looks like:

$VAR1 = [
      'first-node',
      '4',
      3
    ];
$VAR2 = [
      'second-node',
      '1',
      3
    ];
$VAR3 = [
      'another-node',
      '1',
      5
    ];
$VAR4 = [
      'some-node',
      '0',
      5
    ];

To do a grep on this the following works:

my @match = grep { grep { $_ =~ $node } @$_ } @fin_nodes;

So given a $node "second-node" the above statement will return @match as:

$VAR1 = [
  'second-node',
  '1',
  3
];
  • 2
    Why not use a hash instead? – Sobrique Nov 14 '17 at 14:13
  • 2
    when dumping an array, do Data::Dumper::Dumper(\@array), not ...(@array). if passed a list, Dumper dumps each element individually, which is not what you want here – ysth Nov 14 '17 at 15:40
up vote 5 down vote accepted

I would say "don't" and instead:

my %fin_nodes;
$fin_nodes{$node} = [$hindex, $e->{$hip}->{FREQ}]);

And then you can simply if ($fin_nodes{$node}) {

Failing that though - you don't need to grep every element, as your node name is always first.

So:

 my @matches = grep { $_ -> [0] eq $node } @fin_nodes; 

eq is probably a better choice than =~ here, because the latter will substring match. (And worse, can potentially do some quite unexpected things if you've metacharacters in there, since you're not quoting or escaping them)

E.g. in your example - if you look for a node called "node" you'll get multiple hits.

Note - if you're only looking for one match, you can do something like:

my ( $first_match ) =  grep { $_ -> [0] eq $node } @fin_nodes; 

This will just get you the first result, and the rest will be discarded. (Which isn't too efficient, because grep will continue to iterate the whole list).

  • Your last statement was on point, I only needed one match. Then before pushing a node onto fin_nodes this was enough: "if (!$first_match)" – Taranasaur Nov 14 '17 at 14:39
  • 1
    @Taranasaur: I think you missed the point of Sobrique's answer. A hash is by far the better choice for this, and you can simply write $fin_nodes{$node} //= [ $hindex, $e->{$hip}{FREQ} ] and avoid the need for any explicit test altogether. – Borodin Nov 14 '17 at 15:12
  • @Borodin, no I do get Sobrique's point. The fin_nodes array is being used for a simple list function that another method is already using quite happily in my program. I will at some point go back and create a hash as there might be more attributes I'll need to include in that array/hash – Taranasaur Nov 14 '17 at 15:39
  • 2
    "because the latter will substring match" assuming no regex metacharacters; if there are any, it will be even worse – ysth Nov 14 '17 at 15:43
  • Good point @ysth I will add that. – Sobrique Nov 14 '17 at 17:38

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