5

In Zed Shaw's Learn Python the Hard Way (page 15-16), he has an example exercise

 100 - 25 * 3 % 4

the result is 97 (try it!)

I cannot see the order of operations that could do this..

100 - 25 = 75
3 % 4 = 0
or (100-25*3) =225 % 4 = ??? but anyhow not 97 I don't think...

A similar example is 3 + 2 + 1 - 5 + 4 % 2 - 1 / 4 + 6 which yields 7

In what order are the operations done?

24

For the first example: * and % take precedence over -, so we first evaluate 25 * 3 % 4. * and % have the same priority and associativity from left to right, so we evaluate from left to right, starting with 25 * 3. This yields 75. Now we evaluate 75 % 4, yielding 3. Finally, 100 - 3 is 97.

  • Thanks to all this, your answer and the ones that follow are very helpful, even the references, and I have most don't really make this clear, and the whole modulo concept is a bit alien to me..although I get it have never had the use case.(for modulo that is..) – dartdog Jan 19 '11 at 3:13
  • a standard wall clock is "modulo 60" because once you get to 59 minutes, and add 1 minute, you get 0 (== 60) – Felipe Alvarez Dec 17 '12 at 4:35
  • I had the same question, thanks! – Drewdin Jan 3 '13 at 21:57
  • The modulo is just the remainder of division. Knowing when to us it can be tricky, but the concept is rooted in basic math. – JFA Oct 15 '13 at 0:03
2

Multiplication >> mod >> subtraction

In [3]: 25 * 3
Out[3]: 75

In [4]: 75 % 4
Out[4]: 3

In [5]: 100 - 3
Out[5]: 97

Multiplication and modulo operator have the same precedence, so you evaluate from left to right for this example.

  • It's not only a question of what appears first. For example 2**3**4 == 2**(3**4), because the associativity of ** is right to left. – Sven Marnach Jan 18 '11 at 23:19
  • Editing to make it a little clearer based on Sven's comment. – chauncey Jan 19 '11 at 15:49
2

I figured out the answer to your second question because it was bugging me too--Zac's response is close, but the loss of the result of 1/4 is because of Python 2.X is truncating integer division results. So it's evaluating the modulo operation first, then the division (which since it isn't float, is returned as 0.

3 + 2 + 1 - 5 + 4 % 2 - 1 / 4 + 6
3 + 2 + 1 - 5 + (0) - (0) + 6 
6 - 5 + 6
1 + 6
7
0

Here's how it goes:

'*' and '%' have the same precendence, so evaluate those from left to right.

  1. 25*3 = 75
  2. 75 % 4 = 3 (4*18 = 72; remainder is 3)
  3. 100 - 3 = 97

Q.E.D.

  • Not everything with the same precedence is evaluated from left to right -- e.g. 2**3**4 == 2**(3**4) is evaluated from right to left. – Sven Marnach Jan 18 '11 at 23:20
0

Original problem: 100 - 25 * 3 % 4

Actually, evaluating 25 * 3 and taking 75% of 4 is incorrect, and happened to work out conveniently for this problem.

What the % in python actually is is a modulus operator where x % y gives the remainder of x / y. In this case, what happened was that 75 / 4 is 18, with a remainder of 3, which is why 100 - 3 = 97.

Do not try to multiply the percentages, it's a common mistake.

0

In the second exampe, %has same order as * so we get 3+2+1-5+4%2-1/4+6= 3+2+1-5+(4%2)-(1/4)+6=1+(4%2)-(1/4)+6 =1+0-(1/4)+6=1-(1/4)+6=0.75+6=6.75 and that is what it says when I try it on the console, so whatever you did you must have done something to round it.

0

Mathematics isn't my strong point, so yes this question got me as well, for a moment. But hope you find this useful.

75 divided by 4 is 18.75

18 multiplied by 4 is 72 (leaving 3 remaining from the 75)

The calculation given is 100-25*3%4 with an answer of 97. Now this is how I would get it using PEMDAS as he speaks of in the question section:

#!/bin/python

A = 100
B = 25
C = 3
D = 4
E = B*C # 75
F = E%D # 3
G = A-F # 97
print("B * C ="), E
print("E % D ="), F
print("A - F ="), G

I think you have to treat modulo (%) as a division,

0

Python evaluates % after * but before + or _ .

So,

(100 - 25 * 3 % 4)
(100 - 75 % 4)
(100 - 3) 
(97)

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