2

New to clojure with a java background. I have the following table and need to transform the table to a hash-map that maps products to the city that has the highest sale. For example, the output should look like:

{"Pencil": "Toronto"
"Bread": "Ottawa"}

(def table [
    {:product "Pencil"
    :city "Toronto"
    :year "2010"
    :sales "2653.00"}
    {:product "Pencil"
    :city "Oshawa"
    :year "2010"
    :sales "525.00"}
    {:product "Bread"
    :city "Toronto"
    :year "2010"
    :sales "136,264.00"}
    {:product "Bread"
    :city "Oshawa"
    :year "nil"
    :sales "242,634.00"}
    {:product "Bread"
    :city "Ottawa"
    :year "2011"
    :sales "426,164.00"}])

This is what I have so far:

(reduce (fn [product-cities {:keys [product sales]}]
         (update-in product-cities [product] (fnil conj []) sales))
       {}
       table)

This produces the outcome:

{"Bread"
["136,264.00"
"242,634.00"
"426,164.00"],
 "Pencil" ["2653.00" "525.00"]}

How can i compare the sales of each city and and only keep the name of the city with the highest sales? Having a really tough time with this. Thanks

8
0

there is a handy function max-key in clojure.core, that is perfectly suitable for this case:

(defn process [table]
  (let [parseDouble #(Double/parseDouble (clojure.string/replace % #"," ""))]
    (->> table
         (group-by :product)
         (map (comp (juxt :product :city)
                    (partial apply max-key (comp parseDouble :sales))
                    val))
         (into {}))))

user> (process table)
;;=> {"Pencil" "Toronto", "Bread" "Ottawa"}

the key is that (partial apply max-key (comp parseDouble :sales)) part looks for the record in a group, having maximum parsed sales value.

| improve this answer | |
  • I would have written almost the same answer – the variation being that I now like to use into with a transducer as this avoids at least one level of laziness overhead. Like this: (into {} (map (comp ,,,)) (group-by :product table)). – glts Nov 15 '17 at 22:17
3
0

You need some function that will convert the sales values from strings to numbers. For now assuming the sales numbers are indeed numbers, this should do the trick:

(->> table
     (group-by :product)
     (map (fn [[k v]]
            [k (first (sort-by (comp - identity :sales) v))]))
     (into {})
     vals
     (map (comp #(apply vector %)
                vals
                #(select-keys % [:product :city])))
     (into {}))

Replace identity with your string->number function.

No doubt this function can be improved...

| improve this answer | |
1
0

You can use something like:

(into {} (map (fn [[k {:keys [city sales]}]] [k city])
                (reduce (fn [product-cities {:keys [product sales city]}]
                          (let [sales (Double/parseDouble (clojure.string/replace sales "," ""))
                                prev-sales (get-in product-cities [product :sales] 0)]
                            (if (> sales prev-sales)
                              (assoc product-cities product {:sales sales :city city})
                              product-cities)))
                        {}
                        table)))

P.S. Although previous answer could be more readable...

| improve this answer | |
0
0

Here is a pretty fast version that avoids intermediate data structures:

(let [parse #(Double/parseDouble (clojure.string/replace % "," ""))]
  (reduce (fn [m {:keys [product sales city] :as cand}]
            (let [sales-d (parse sales)]
              (update m product (fn [prev]
                                  (if (or (nil? prev) (< (:sales prev) sales-d))
                                    (assoc cand :sales sales-d) 
                                    prev)))))
          {} products))
| improve this answer | |
0
0

A spinoff idea based on @leetwinski answer. Idea is to use sort-by on sales' values as it's a bit more basic in the language.

(defn process [table]
  (let [parseDouble #(Double/parseDouble (clojure.string/replace % #"," ""))
        parsedTable (for [a table] (update a :sales parseDouble))]
    (->> parsedTable
         (sort-by :sales)
         (group-by :product)
         vals        
         (map (comp (juxt :product :city) last))
         (into {}))))
 (process table)
=>{"Bread" "Ottawa" "Pencil" "Toronto"}
| improve this answer | |
-1
0

Here is how I would do it. I used spyx-pretty from the Tupelo library to make visualizing the intermediate steps easier (API docs can be found here). The code:

(ns tst.demo.core
  (:use demo.core
        tupelo.test)
  (:require [tupelo.core :as t]
            [clojure.string :as str] ))
(t/refer-tupelo)

(def table
  [{:product "Pencil" :city "Toronto" :year "2010" :sales "2653.00"}
   {:product "Pencil" :city "Oshawa" :year "2010" :sales "525.00"}
   {:product "Bread" :city "Toronto" :year "2010" :sales "136,264.00"}
   {:product "Bread" :city "Oshawa" :year "nil" :sales "242,634.00"}
   {:product "Bread" :city "Ottawa" :year "2011" :sales "426,164.00"}])

(defn str->double
  "Convert a string like '2,123.97' to a double like 2123.97 "
  [str-val]
  (let [no-commas (str/replace str-val #"," "")
        dbl-val   (Double/parseDouble no-commas)]
    dbl-val))

(dotest
  (let [table-num (forv [item table]
                    (update item :sales str->double))
        grouped   (group-by :product table-num)
        >>        (spyx-pretty grouped)
        group-max (forv [group grouped]
                    (do
                      (spyx-pretty group)
                      (let [records        (xsecond group)
                            >>             (spyx-pretty records)
                            records-sorted (sort-by :sales > records)
                            >>             (spyx-pretty records-sorted)
                            max-rec        (xfirst records-sorted)
                            ]
                        (spyx max-rec))))]
    (spyx-pretty group-max)))

The results are:

---------------------------------------
   Clojure 1.9.0-beta1    Java 9.0.1
---------------------------------------

Testing tst.demo.core

grouped => 
{"Pencil"
 [{:product "Pencil", :city "Toronto", :year "2010", :sales 2653.0}
  {:product "Pencil", :city "Oshawa", :year "2010", :sales 525.0}],
 "Bread"
 [{:product "Bread", :city "Toronto", :year "2010", :sales 136264.0}
  {:product "Bread", :city "Oshawa", :year "nil", :sales 242634.0}
  {:product "Bread", :city "Ottawa", :year "2011", :sales 426164.0}]}

group => 
["Pencil"
 [{:product "Pencil", :city "Toronto", :year "2010", :sales 2653.0}
  {:product "Pencil", :city "Oshawa", :year "2010", :sales 525.0}]]

records => 
[{:product "Pencil", :city "Toronto", :year "2010", :sales 2653.0}
 {:product "Pencil", :city "Oshawa", :year "2010", :sales 525.0}]

records-sorted => 
({:product "Pencil", :city "Toronto", :year "2010", :sales 2653.0}
 {:product "Pencil", :city "Oshawa", :year "2010", :sales 525.0})
max-rec => {:product "Pencil", :city "Toronto", :year "2010", :sales 2653.0}

group => 
["Bread"
 [{:product "Bread", :city "Toronto", :year "2010", :sales 136264.0}
  {:product "Bread", :city "Oshawa", :year "nil", :sales 242634.0}
  {:product "Bread", :city "Ottawa", :year "2011", :sales 426164.0}]]

records => 
[{:product "Bread", :city "Toronto", :year "2010", :sales 136264.0}
 {:product "Bread", :city "Oshawa", :year "nil", :sales 242634.0}
 {:product "Bread", :city "Ottawa", :year "2011", :sales 426164.0}]

records-sorted => 
({:product "Bread", :city "Ottawa", :year "2011", :sales 426164.0}
 {:product "Bread", :city "Oshawa", :year "nil", :sales 242634.0}
 {:product "Bread", :city "Toronto", :year "2010", :sales 136264.0})
max-rec => {:product "Bread", :city "Ottawa", :year "2011", :sales 426164.0}

group-max => 
[{:product "Pencil", :city "Toronto", :year "2010", :sales 2653.0}
 {:product "Bread", :city "Ottawa", :year "2011", :sales 426164.0}]

Note that the 1st step is to convert all string sales values to floating point. Then, it is easiest if we use the built-in function group-by to separate out pencils from Bread, etc. I like to keep each step separate for ease of thinking, and also so I can put debug printouts at each step.

IMHO this is more straightforward than using the REPL, as I can stay in my favorite IDE/editor and the stuff I type is saved in a file rather than disappearing as soon as I hit .

| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    I think if you are going to use non-core libraries then you should make it explicit in the code. forv is a tupelo function right? Why not t/forv? The only exception I can think of is core.async, which has some very funny function names that stand out. – Chris Murphy Nov 15 '17 at 8:36
  • The line (t/refer-tupelo) refers a number of vars into the current namespace (instead of a :use clause). I prefer this method as I use them all the time and get tired of the extra typing re spyx, spyx-pretty, forv, dotest is=, xfirst, xsecond, etc. If I didn't include the whole source with the ns and (t/refer-tupelo), then I agree being explicit about the namespace would be more important. – Alan Thompson Nov 15 '17 at 19:19
  • My argument was about readability for others, rather than convenience for yourself. – Chris Murphy Nov 15 '17 at 23:13

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