3

How can we marshal/unmarshal the root element in a JSON that contains a list using JAXB?

So it would the JSON as

{
    "tag" : [
        {
            "id" : "a",
            "id2": "aa" 
        },
        {
            "id" : "b",
            "id2" : "bb" 
        },
        {
            "id" : "c",
            "id2" : "cc" 
        } 
    ] 
}

I am using Apache CXF which supports JSON through Jettison.

The Java class could look like the one below. One could use a XmlList annotation for the list, and XmlValue for having that list in the root element. The problem is XmlValue would not take a user-defined type.

@XmlRootElement(name = "tag")
public class test
{
    @XmlList
    @XmlValue
    private List<UserDefinedType> testList;
}

Is there a way to get around this. I need this to work for un-marshalling an incoming JSON. Got this idea from here http://bdoughan.blogspot.com/2010/09/jaxb-collection-properties.html

  • Why are you trying to use JAXB to serialize JSON? JAXB is for XML binding only... It isn't a generic data modeling framework with flexible bindings. – Konstantin Komissarchik Jan 18 '11 at 21:46
  • JAXB is being used for JSON also. Look here blogs.sun.com/arungupta/entry/totd_8_generating_json_using and here jettison.codehaus.org – Hardy Jan 18 '11 at 22:05
  • While some tools can marshal JAXB-annotated classes to JSON (e.g. Jackson and apparently Jettison), this is very non-standard, and depends on the tool. Are you using Jettison with XStream? – skaffman Jan 18 '11 at 22:10
  • I am using Apache CXF which supports JSON through Jettison. – Hardy Jan 18 '11 at 22:15
  • Need more information -- what kind of Java object do you want to operate on? Also, even without knowing this, users often ditch jettison as soon as they have tried Jackson ("pure" JSON) approach, and I think CXF also supports Jacksons (Jersey and RESTeasy do for sure) – StaxMan Jan 19 '11 at 0:20
2

This should work for the JSON format you mentioned. However, it might not work if you want to marshall/unmarshall to a certain XML format too.

@XmlRootElement
public class Test {
    @XmlElement(name = "tag")
    private List<UserDefinedType> testList;
}

public class UserDefinedType {
    @XmlElement(name = "id")
    private String someId;

    @XmlElement(name = "id2")
    private String someId2;
}
0

This worked for me. The names of the XmlRootElement and the list are the same.

@XmlRootElement(name = "tag")
@XmlAccessorType(XmlAccessType.FIELD)
public class Test {
    @XmlElement(name = "tag")
    public List<UserDefinedType> testList;
}

@XmlAccessorType(XmlAccessType.FIELD)
public class UserDefinedType {
    @XmlElement(name = "id")
    public String someId;

    @XmlElement(name = "id2")
    public String someId2;
}

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.