1

What happens when a method returns a Task that is contained in a try/catch block? If that non-awaited Task throws an exception, is the exception caught/handled?

For example, if DoSomethingAsync() throws an exception, can I handle it in the try/catch block in TryCatchMethod()?

Task TryCatchMethod()
{
    try
    {
        return DoSomethingAsync();
    }
    catch(Exception e)
    {
        //Handle Exception
    }
}

async Task DoSomethingAsync()
{
   await Task.Delay(10000);
   throw new System.Exception();
}
2
  • 1
    Not unless you await DoSomethingAsync. – Kirk Larkin Nov 15 '17 at 19:55
  • 2
    That depends. If for example you have method Task DoSomethingAsync() { throw new Exception("test")} - this exception will be caught by your try-catch. – Evk Nov 15 '17 at 20:05
6

If DoSomethingAsync throws an exception, the exception is caught. If it returns a faulted task, instead of throwing, then there is no exception to catch until you try to get the task's result (by awaiting it). Since you don't do that in your try block, it won't run your catch block.

Note that if the method is marked as async any exceptions thrown in the body of that method are caught and result in the method returning a faulted task, rather than the method throwing an exception. For the method to throw an exception the method would need to return a Task without being marked as async.

2
  • 2
    The following will reach OPs catch block even when marked as async: async Task DoSomethingAsync() {Thread.CurrentThread.Abort();}. A bit contrieved but still. – Evk Nov 15 '17 at 20:32
  • @Evk You could also have the method go into infinite recursion, or consume more than the available memory, or do other such things that cause the environment itself to throw an exception, rather than for that method to throw an exception. – Servy Nov 15 '17 at 20:48
6

Answer

No, the try/catch block in TryCatchMethod() will not catch an exception if one occurs in DoSomethingAsync() because of 2 reasons:

  1. The exception will be caught in MoveNext()
  2. DoSomethingAsync() is not awaitd, so the exception will never be rethrown

Solutions

  1. Await DoSomethingAsync() (Prefered)
async Task TryCatchMethod()
{
    try
    {
       await DoSomethingAsync();
    }
    catch(Exception e)
    {
        //Handle Exception
    }
}
  1. Use .GetAwaiter().GetResult()
void TryCatchMethod()
{
    try
    {
       DoSomethingAsync().GetAwaiter().GetResult();
    }
    catch(Exception e)
    {
        //Handle Exception
    }
}

Note: .GetAwaiter().GetResult() is not recommended because it will lock the current thread.

Explanation

To understand why the try/catch block doesn't catch the exception, it's important to first understand how the compiler generates IL code for an async method.

Compiler-Generated Code for Async Method

enter image description here

(Source: Xamarin University: Using Async and Await)

The compiler transforms an async method into an IAsyncStateMachine class which allows the .NET Runtime to "remember" what the method has accomplished.

enter image description here

(Source: Xamarin University: Using Async and Await)

The IAsyncStateMachine interface implements MoveNext(), a method that executes everytime the await operator is used inside of the async method.

MoveNext() essentially runs your code until it reaches an await statement, then it returns while the await'd method executes. This is the mechanism that allows the current method to "pause", yielding its thread execution to another thread/Task.

Try/Catch in MoveNext()

Look closely at MoveNext(); notice that it is wrapped in a try/catch block.

Because the compiler creates IAsyncStateMachine for every async method and MoveNext() is always wrapped in a try/catch, every exception thrown inside of an async method is caught!

How to Rethrow an Exception Caught By MoveNext

Now the question becomes, if every async method catches every exception thrown, How can I rethrow the exception?

There are a few ways to rethrow exceptions that are thrown in an async method:

  1. Use the await keyword (Prefered)
    • e.g. await DoSomethingAsync()
  2. Use .GetAwaiter().GetResult()
    • e.g. DoSomethingAsync().GetAwaiter().GetResult()

The await keyword is preferred because await allows the Task to run asynchronously on a different thread, and it will not lock-up the current thread.

What About .Result or .Wait()?

Never, never, never, never, never use .Result or .Wait():

  1. Both .Result and .Wait() will lock-up the current thread. If the current thread is the Main Thread (also known as the UI Thread), your UI will freeze until the Task has completed. 2..Result or .Wait() rethrow your exception as a System.AggregateException, which makes it difficult to find the actual exception.

Example

Don't Do This

var longRunningTask1 = LongRunningTaskAsync();
var longRunningTask2 = LongRunningTaskAsync();

await Task.WhenAll(longRunningTask1, longRunningTask2);

var result1 = longRunningTask1.Result;
var result2 = longRunningTask2.Result;

Instead, Do This

var longRunningTask1 = LongRunningTaskAsync();
var longRunningTask2 = LongRunningTaskAsync();

await Task.WhenAll(longRunningTask1, longRunningTask2);

var result1 = await longRunningTask1;
var result2 = await longRunningTask2;
2

The exception is thrown when the task is awaited. The compiler generated code when a task is awaited with the await key word cleverly unwraps the exceptions and throws them how you would expect with a reasonably sensible stack trace. It is also thrown if you access the result of the task or call wait but it's then thrown as an aggregate exception and this isn't the best practice. If you never await the task the exception eventually becomes an unoberserved task exception and can be fatal to your program and also has a rubbish stack trace

0

Exception will be thrown when you access result of task execution with await task, task.Result or task Wait().

In your case, if exception is thrown inside a task within DoSomethingAsync(), it will not be caught by TryCatchMethod() but will be caught by an outer method that awaits on the task returned by TryCatchMethod().

Check for more details: Exception Handling (Task Parallel Library)

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