2

I'm trying to format a MySQL statement with today's data, as well as 7 days back. I'm pretty sure the date is in the correct format, so I don't think that's the issue.

The error report is:

 Warning: (1292, "Incorrect datetime value: '{} 16:00:00' for column 'run_start_date' at row 1")
      result = self._query(query)
    Traceback (most recent call last):
         AttributeError: 'int' object has no attribute 'format'

e.g.

today = DT.date.today()
week_ago = today - DT.timedelta(days=7)
print(today.strftime('%Y-%m-%d'))
print(week_ago.strftime('%Y-%m-%d'))

cursor.execute(SELECT * FROM db WHERE run_start_date BETWEEN '{} 16:00:00' AND '{} 16:00:00'format(week_ago, today)
  • 1
    The code you show is syntactically incorrect. What is your actual code? – cs95 Nov 15 '17 at 23:17
  • Well you can't use format on an int, so there's that. – SuperStew Nov 15 '17 at 23:18
  • Check my answer, hope it helped. If so please mark as correct. Best of luck! – alexisdevarennes Nov 15 '17 at 23:31
5

Using prepared statements (safe way):

qry = """
    SELECT *
    FROM db
    WHERE run_start_date BETWEEN '%s 16:00:00' AND '%s 16:00:00'
""" # 

today = DT.date.today()
week_ago = today - DT.timedelta(days=7)
today = str(today.strftime('%Y-%m-%d'))  # Convert to string
week_ago = str(week_ago.strftime('%Y-%m-%d'))  # Convert to string

cursor.execute(qry, [today, week_ago])

Using .format() which leaves you at risk for sql injections (if you pass user input to .format() e.g.)

qry = """
    SELECT *
    FROM db
    WHERE run_start_date BETWEEN '{today} 16:00:00' AND '{week_ago} 16:00:00'
""" # Use named placeholders, nicer to read, prevents you having to repeat variables multiple time when calling .format()

today = DT.date.today()
week_ago = today - DT.timedelta(days=7)
today = str(today.strftime('%Y-%m-%d'))  # Convert to string
week_ago = str(week_ago.strftime('%Y-%m-%d'))  # Convert to string

qry = qry.format(today=today, week_ago=week_ago)
cursor.execute(qry)
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Then why not show an example of that instead? Don't confused what the asker has said and what they want. It's more likely they want the equivalent in sql - which is prepared statements. – Shadow Nov 15 '17 at 23:34
  • 2
    It will happen when someone comes alone to the site and copy pastes this example for user input. There's no good reason to teach bad habits like this one, except to show why it's a bad habit. – Shadow Nov 15 '17 at 23:35
  • 1
    And good on you. +1 for the bold text, though I think you could also swap them around (ie, this is the way to do it correctly, and this is the dangerous way if you really want to know) as it'll help readers chose the correct one. – Shadow Nov 15 '17 at 23:39
  • 2
    You are right, really grateful for input, didnt consider fact other users might copy answer. High five bro/sis! – alexisdevarennes Nov 15 '17 at 23:40
  • 1
    Very nice. +10. In this particular case, the code wasn't subject to SQL Injection... but it did follow the same pattern we see in code that is vulnerable to SQL Injection. It's much better to do it the right way, with prepared statement and bind placeholder. It's much easier for the reader to see (right there where the SQL text is constructed) that it's not a pattern vulnerable to SQL Injection. And it's not hard to do. Exploits of a Mom xkcd.com/327 and OWASP SQL Injection owasp.org/index.php/SQL_Injection – spencer7593 Nov 15 '17 at 23:44

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