I'm wondering if I'm doing something wrong, or if this is just a quirk in how everything is processed in MySQL. Here's the setup: (I can't seem to find this exact topic anywhere else)

I have two tables order and menu.

menu has an 'id' (for the item), an 'item' and three prices ('prc1' 'prc2' 'prc3') in each row.

menu +----+----------+------+------+------+
     |'id'|  'item'  |'prc1'|'prc2'|'prc3'|
     +----+----------+------+------+------+
     |  1 | 'tshirt' | 3.00 | 4.50 | 4.00 |
     |  2 | 'socks'  | 1.00 | 2.50 | 2.00 |
     +----+----------+------+------+------+

order also has an item id to match against the order menu, ('i_id'), and an integer I use for filtering the prices later in php ('prc_id').

order +------+--------+
      |'i_id'|'prc_id'|
      +--------+------+
      |  1   |   1    | # i_id matches id - tshirt and informs to use prc1
      |  2   |   3    | # i_id matchis id - socks and uses prc3
      +--------+------+

I use JOIN to match the orders up to the items

"SELECT order.prc_id, menu.item, menu.prc1, menu.prc2, menu.prc3
        FROM order 
        LEFT JOIN menu 
        ON order.i_id = menu.id"

I then get the result back, and initially to make sure everything panned out, I printed the array:

$result = mysql_query($query)
while($row = mysql_fetch_array($result))
    {
        print_r($row);
    }

This is the array I get back (obviously dummy info for the initial tests):

Array 
 ( 
    [0] => 1 [prc_id] => 1         #the value (1) for 'prc_id' is given twice
    [1] => tshirt [item] => tshirt #the value (tshirt) for 'item' is given twice
    [2] => 3.00 [prc1] => 3.00     #the value (3.00) for 'prc1' is given twice
    [3] => 4.50 [prc2] => 4.50     #etc
    [4] => 4.00 [prc3] => 4.00

    [0] => 3 [prc_id] => 3
    [1] => socks [item] => socks
    [2] => 1.00 [prc1] => 1.00 
    [3] => 2.50 [prc2] => 2.50 
    [4] => 2.00 [prc3] => 2.00
 )

So my question(finally, right? xD)... Why is duplicate data sent back in the array response?

Have I done something wrong? Am I overlooking something?

It's not a huge issue, it doesn't affect my end result, I'd just like to be as precise as possible.

Thank you for your time. :)

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If think this is a PHP print_r() problem.

print_r() return a numeric representation and the second the named store row.

EDIT:

Try your query with the Database Query Tool then you will see the original result.

  • Hm, thank you. It didn't even cross my mind that print_r() might be the problem. I did indeed run it from command line to make certain things were kosher. It's just odd that the interpretation is so strange. Thanks again. :) – Squish Jan 19 '11 at 8:07
     SELECT order.prc_id, menu.item, menu.prc1, menu.prc2, menu.prc3
     FROM order
      LEFT JOIN menu
      ON order.i_id = menu.id

It looks like you are joining based on the item_id in order and id of menu, while you should be doing based on (if I understand correctly) the item_id of menu.

Something like:

     SELECT order.prc_id, menu.item, menu.prc1, menu.prc2, menu.prc3
     FROM order
      LEFT JOIN menu
      ON order.i_id = menu.item_id
  • I do match to the item's id. I changed some of the formatting above, hopefully to clarify. I get the proper data, I just get redundant proper data. e.g: [1] => tshirt [item] => tshirt [2] => 3.00 [prc1] => 3.00 It returns an index: 1 w/ value: tshirt, an index: item w/ val: tshirt... then an index: 2 of 3.00 and index: prc1 w/ val: 3.00. I'm wondering... why the redundancy? – Squish Jan 19 '11 at 6:45

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