1162

How do you left pad an int with zeros when converting to a String in java?

I'm basically looking to pad out integers up to 9999 with leading zeros (e.g. 1 = 0001).

4
  • 2
    Yup, that's it! my bad... I typed it in on my phone. You dont' need the "new String" either : Integer.toString(num+10000).subString(1) works.
    – Randyaa
    Sep 23, 2014 at 15:10
  • Long.valueOf("00003400").toString(); Integer.valueOf("00003400").toString(); --->3400
    – frekele
    Jul 20, 2015 at 22:32
  • 1
    see also stackoverflow.com/questions/35521278/… for a solution with diagram
    – bvdb
    Feb 20, 2016 at 11:33
  • There is a problem with the new String(Integer.toString(num + 10000)).substring(1) approach if num is any bigger than 9999 though, ijs.
    – Felype
    Jun 23, 2016 at 12:43

18 Answers 18

1893

Use java.lang.String.format(String,Object...) like this:

String.format("%05d", yournumber);

for zero-padding with a length of 5. For hexadecimal output replace the d with an x as in "%05x".

The full formatting options are documented as part of java.util.Formatter.

9
  • 1
    Should I expect the options in String.format to be akin to printf() in C? Apr 13, 2011 at 18:23
  • 17
    If you have to do this for a large list of values, performance of DecimalFormat is at least 3 times better than String.format(). I'm in the process of doing some performance tuning myself and running the two in Visual VM shows the String.format() method accumulating CPU time at about 3-4 times the rate of DecimalFormat.format(). May 1, 2013 at 17:56
  • 14
    And to add more than 9 zeros use something like %012d Aug 23, 2014 at 11:26
  • 2
    This is for Java 5 and above. For 1.4 and lower DecimalFormat is an alternative as shown here javadevnotes.com/java-integer-to-string-with-leading-zeros
    – JavaDev
    Mar 5, 2015 at 3:38
  • 1
    Hi guys! I have some problems using: %d can't format java.lang.String arguments Aug 25, 2016 at 18:38
171

Let's say you want to print 11 as 011

You could use a formatter: "%03d".

enter image description here

You can use this formatter like this:

int a = 11;
String with3digits = String.format("%03d", a);
System.out.println(with3digits);

Alternatively, some java methods directly support these formatters:

System.out.printf("%03d", a);
5
  • 5
    @Omar Koohei indeed, but it explains the reasoning behind the "magic constants".
    – bvdb
    Feb 22, 2016 at 16:20
  • Nice answer! Just a comment, the F of format() should be f: String.format(...);. Nov 6, 2016 at 17:14
  • what if i dont want to append a leading 0 but another letter/number? thanks Jan 14, 2019 at 15:01
  • 1
    @chiperortiz afaik it's not possible with the above formatting tools. In that case, I calculate the required leading characters (e.g. int prefixLength = requiredTotalLength - String.valueOf(numericValue).length), and then use a repeat string method to create the required prefix. There are various ways to repeat strings, but there isn't a native java one, afaik: stackoverflow.com/questions/1235179/…
    – bvdb
    Jan 16, 2019 at 16:28
  • @chiperortiz starting from java 11 there is a String.repeat method though.
    – bvdb
    May 5 at 20:50
123

If you for any reason use pre 1.5 Java then may try with Apache Commons Lang method

org.apache.commons.lang.StringUtils.leftPad(String str, int size, '0')
0
33

Found this example... Will test...

import java.text.DecimalFormat;
class TestingAndQualityAssuranceDepartment
{
    public static void main(String [] args)
    {
        int x=1;
        DecimalFormat df = new DecimalFormat("00");
        System.out.println(df.format(x));
    }
}

Tested this and:

String.format("%05d",number);

Both work, for my purposes I think String.Format is better and more succinct.

3
  • 1
    Yes, I was going to suggest DecimalFormat because I didn't know about String.format, but then I saw uzhin's answer. String.format must be new. Jan 23, 2009 at 15:48
  • It's similar how you'd do it in .Net Except the .Net way looks nicer for small numbers. Jan 23, 2009 at 16:00
  • In my case I used the first option (DecimalFormat) because my number was a Double
    – mauronet
    Aug 1, 2016 at 21:06
25

Try this one:

import java.text.DecimalFormat; 

DecimalFormat df = new DecimalFormat("0000");

String c = df.format(9);   // Output: 0009

String a = df.format(99);  // Output: 0099

String b = df.format(999); // Output: 0999
22

If performance is important in your case you could do it yourself with less overhead compared to the String.format function:

/**
 * @param in The integer value
 * @param fill The number of digits to fill
 * @return The given value left padded with the given number of digits
 */
public static String lPadZero(int in, int fill){

    boolean negative = false;
    int value, len = 0;

    if(in >= 0){
        value = in;
    } else {
        negative = true;
        value = - in;
        in = - in;
        len ++;
    }

    if(value == 0){
        len = 1;
    } else{         
        for(; value != 0; len ++){
            value /= 10;
        }
    }

    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();

    if(negative){
        sb.append('-');
    }

    for(int i = fill; i > len; i--){
        sb.append('0');
    }

    sb.append(in);

    return sb.toString();       
}

Performance

public static void main(String[] args) {
    Random rdm;
    long start; 

    // Using own function
    rdm = new Random(0);
    start = System.nanoTime();

    for(int i = 10000000; i != 0; i--){
        lPadZero(rdm.nextInt(20000) - 10000, 4);
    }
    System.out.println("Own function: " + ((System.nanoTime() - start) / 1000000) + "ms");

    // Using String.format
    rdm = new Random(0);        
    start = System.nanoTime();

    for(int i = 10000000; i != 0; i--){
        String.format("%04d", rdm.nextInt(20000) - 10000);
    }
    System.out.println("String.format: " + ((System.nanoTime() - start) / 1000000) + "ms");
}

Result

Own function: 1697ms

String.format: 38134ms

4
  • 1
    Above there's a mention of using DecimalFormat being faster. Did you have any notes on that?
    – Patrick
    May 22, 2014 at 19:21
  • @Patrick For DecimalFormat performance see also: stackoverflow.com/questions/8553672/…
    – Stephan
    Jun 10, 2016 at 10:30
  • Shocking! It's nuts that function works so poorly. I had to zero pad and display a collection of unsigned ints that could range between 1 to 3 digits. It needed to work lightning fast. I used this simple method: for( int i : data ) strData += (i > 9 ? (i > 99 ? "" : "0") : "00") + Integer.toString( i ) + "|"; That worked very rapidly (sorry I didn't time it!).
    – BuvinJ
    Jul 3, 2017 at 21:45
  • How does the performance compare after it's been run enough for HotSpot to have a crack at it?
    – Phil
    Feb 8, 2018 at 19:44
17

You can use Google Guava:

Maven:

<dependency>
     <artifactId>guava</artifactId>
     <groupId>com.google.guava</groupId>
     <version>14.0.1</version>
</dependency>

Sample code:

String paddedString1 = Strings.padStart("7", 3, '0'); //"007"
String paddedString2 = Strings.padStart("2020", 3, '0'); //"2020"

Note:

Guava is very useful library, it also provides lots of features which related to Collections, Caches, Functional idioms, Concurrency, Strings, Primitives, Ranges, IO, Hashing, EventBus, etc

Ref: GuavaExplained

2
  • 1
    Above sample code is usage only, not really sample code. The comment reflect this, you would need "String myPaddedString = Strings.padStart(...)"
    – JoeG
    Jul 27, 2016 at 11:49
  • 2
    This method actually gives much better performance results than JDK String.format / MessageFormatter / DecimalFormatter.
    – rafalmag
    Apr 14, 2017 at 11:05
15

Here is how you can format your string without using DecimalFormat.

String.format("%02d", 9)

09

String.format("%03d", 19)

019

String.format("%04d", 119)

0119

3

Although many of the above approaches are good, but sometimes we need to format integers as well as floats. We can use this, particularly when we need to pad particular number of zeroes on left as well as right of decimal numbers.

import java.text.NumberFormat;  
public class NumberFormatMain {  

public static void main(String[] args) {  
    int intNumber = 25;  
    float floatNumber = 25.546f;  
    NumberFormat format=NumberFormat.getInstance();  
    format.setMaximumIntegerDigits(6);  
    format.setMaximumFractionDigits(6);  
    format.setMinimumFractionDigits(6);  
    format.setMinimumIntegerDigits(6);  

    System.out.println("Formatted Integer : "+format.format(intNumber).replace(",",""));  
    System.out.println("Formatted Float   : "+format.format(floatNumber).replace(",",""));  
 }    
}  
3
int x = 1;
System.out.format("%05d",x);

if you want to print the formatted text directly onto the screen.

2
  • 1
    But OP never asked for it. Internally String.format and System.out.format call the same java.util.Formatter implementation.
    – bsd
    Aug 24, 2013 at 13:40
  • ... and System.out can be redirected.
    – Phil
    Feb 8, 2018 at 19:44
1

You need to use a Formatter, following code uses NumberFormat

    int inputNo = 1;
    NumberFormat nf = NumberFormat.getInstance();
    nf.setMaximumIntegerDigits(4);
    nf.setMinimumIntegerDigits(4);
    nf.setGroupingUsed(false);

    System.out.println("Formatted Integer : " + nf.format(inputNo));

Output: 0001

1

Use the class DecimalFormat, like so:

NumberFormat formatter = new DecimalFormat("0000"); //i use 4 Zero but you can also another number
System.out.println("OUTPUT : "+formatter.format(811)); 

OUTPUT : 0000811

1
  • 4
    In this case the output is 0811.
    – OJVM
    Jul 14, 2020 at 19:54
1

You can add leading 0 to your string like this. Define a string that will be the maximum length of the string that you want. In my case i need a string that will be only 9 char long.

String d = "602939";
d = "000000000".substring(0, (9-d.length())) + d;
System.out.println(d);

Output : 000602939

0

Check my code that will work for integer and String.

Assume our first number is 2. And we want to add zeros to that so the the length of final string will be 4. For that you can use following code

    int number=2;
    int requiredLengthAfterPadding=4;
    String resultString=Integer.toString(number);
    int inputStringLengh=resultString.length();
    int diff=requiredLengthAfterPadding-inputStringLengh;
    if(inputStringLengh<requiredLengthAfterPadding)
    {
        resultString=new String(new char[diff]).replace("\0", "0")+number;
    }        
    System.out.println(resultString);
3
  • (new char[diff]) why
    – Isaac
    Mar 19, 2016 at 23:16
  • replace("\0", "0")what is... what
    – Isaac
    Mar 19, 2016 at 23:17
  • @Isaac - First I created a char array, and using that char array I created a string. Then I replaced null character(which is the default value of char type) with "0" (which is the char we need here for padding) Mar 22, 2016 at 10:27
0

Use this simple extension function

fun Int.padZero(): String {
    return if (this < 10) {
        "0$this"
    } else {
        this.toString()
    }
}
-1

For Kotlin

fun Calendar.getFullDate(): String {
    val mYear = "${this.get(Calendar.YEAR)}-"
    val mMonth = if (this.get(Calendar.MONTH) + 1 < 10) {
        "0${this.get(Calendar.MONTH) + 1}-"
    } else {
        "${this.get(Calendar.MONTH)+ 1}-"
    }
    val mDate = if (this.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_MONTH)  < 10) {
        "0${this.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_MONTH)}"
    } else {
        "${this.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_MONTH)}"
    }
    return mYear + mMonth + mDate
}

and use it as

val date: String = calendar.getFullDate()

-3

Here is another way to pad an integer with zeros on the left. You can increase the number of zeros as per your convenience. Have added a check to return the same value as is in case of negative number or a value greater than or equals to zeros configured. You can further modify as per your requirement.

/**
 * 
 * @author Dinesh.Lomte
 *
 */
public class AddLeadingZerosToNum {
    
    /**
     * 
     * @param args
     */
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        
        System.out.println(getLeadingZerosToNum(0));
        System.out.println(getLeadingZerosToNum(7));
        System.out.println(getLeadingZerosToNum(13));
        System.out.println(getLeadingZerosToNum(713));
        System.out.println(getLeadingZerosToNum(7013));
        System.out.println(getLeadingZerosToNum(9999));
    }
    /**
     * 
     * @param num
     * @return
     */
    private static String getLeadingZerosToNum(int num) {
        // Initializing the string of zeros with required size
        String zeros = new String("0000");
        // Validating if num value is less then zero or if the length of number 
        // is greater then zeros configured to return the num value as is
        if (num < 0 || String.valueOf(num).length() >= zeros.length()) {
            return String.valueOf(num);
        }
        // Returning zeros in case if value is zero.
        if (num == 0) {
            return zeros;
        }
        return new StringBuilder(zeros.substring(0, zeros.length() - 
                String.valueOf(num).length())).append(
                        String.valueOf(num)).toString();
    }
}

Input

0

7

13

713

7013

9999

Output

0000

0007

0013

7013

9999

-4

No packages needed:

String paddedString = i < 100 ? i < 10 ? "00" + i : "0" + i : "" + i;

This will pad the string to three characters, and it is easy to add a part more for four or five. I know this is not the perfect solution in any way (especially if you want a large padded string), but I like it.

1

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