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I have created a linked-list queue in C. my structs are as such:

typedef struct Node{
    int *data;
    struct Node *next;
} node;

typedef struct Queue{
    node *front, *rear;
} queue;

In my main() function, I am getting a user input determining the length of the queue, creating an array of this length, and getting a user input for each element of the array. I then call a function called runQueue().

void runQueue(int array[], int len){
    queue *q = (queue *)malloc(sizeof(queue));
    q->front = q->rear = NULL;
    for(int i = len - 1; i >= 0; i--){ //len-1, user doesn't input 0-based index
        enQueue(q, array[i]);
    }
    printQueue(q);
    enQueue(q,4);
    printQueue(q);
    queueMenu(q);
}

In this function I am calling a function enQueue() in a loop to enqueue all the nodes into the queue from the array. I am then calling printQueue().

void enQueue(queue *q, int data){
    node *tmp = (node *) malloc(sizeof(node));
    tmp->data = data;
    tmp->next = NULL;

    if (q->rear == NULL){
        q->front = q->rear = tmp;
        return;
    }

    q->rear->next = tmp;
    q->rear = tmp;
}

void printQueue(queue *q){
    int iterator = 0;
    queue *tmp = (queue *)malloc(sizeof(queue));
    tmp = q;
    while(tmp->front->next != tmp->rear->next && tmp->front != NULL){
        iterator += 1;
        //printf("in loop, i = %d\n",iterator);
        printf("Queue node %d: data val %d ptr %p front ptr %p\n", iterator, tmp->front->data, tmp->front, tmp->front->next);
        tmp->front = tmp->front->next;
    }
    printf("Queue node %d: data val %d ptr %p front ptr %p\n", iterator+1, tmp->front->data, tmp->front, tmp->front->next);
    free(tmp);
}

The problem is as such: I can run this, and the enqueue function seems to work fine. The first time I call printQueue(), the function will print the correct result. However, after printing the queue, the values of the front and rear pointer change, and printing trying to perform any more operations on the queue of course results in a segfault since it's trying to access different areas of memory than those it is supposed to. How is it that the values of the pointers is being changed? I have copied the queue to a temporary queue before preceding to change pointer values, so why are the actual queue's pointers changing?

EDIT: as an example of how the array is input to the queue -

int array[3] = {4,3,2};
runQueue(array,3);

then within runQueue(), the for loop is decrementing through the array and calling enQueue() for each element in the array. In this case, calling enQueue(q,2) followed by enQueue(q,3) then enQueue(q,4).

EDIT 2: I tried Thomas Blanquet's suggestion by changing the function to this:

void printQueue(queue *q){
    int iterator = 0;
    node *tmp = (node *)malloc(sizeof(node));
    tmp = q->front;
    while(tmp != NULL){
        iterator += 1;
        printf("Queue node %d: data val %d ptr %p front ptr %p\n", iterator, tmp->data, tmp, tmp->next);
        tmp = tmp->next;
    }
    printf("Queue node %d: data val %d ptr %p front ptr %p\n", iterator+1, tmp->data, tmp, tmp->next);
    free(tmp);
}

After making this change, the pointers are correct, but I am still getting a segfault before exiting the function.

EDIT 3: I tried commenting out free(tmp), but I am still getting a segfault. However I found the problem! Somehow I had a printf() outside the loop which I didn't notice:

printf("Queue node %d: data val %d ptr %p front ptr %p\n", iterator+1, tmp->data, tmp, tmp->next);

Removing this now stops the segfault and all the pointers are correct. Many thanks!

  • You have int *data; in the struct, but you are using it like it is an int: tmp->data = data; and tmp->front->data in the printf with %d. You should see at least some compiler warnings. – mch Nov 16 '17 at 16:37
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There are some problems in your "printQueue" :

First of all, why do you allocate tmp with a malloc, then giving it q's value ? Your malloc allocates memory and returns the address of this memory, but changing it using q, you lost this memory.

Then tmp contains the address of q, so when you do :

tmp->front = tmp->front->next;

you change the front node of your queue.

You should do something like node *tmp = q->front; and use it to iterate over your linked list, almost as you already do with tmp->front. The difference is you will not change the address of your front node in your queue, but a tmp variable which points on the front node of it.

Finally, by using tmp != NULL as condition, you will not have to do a special case for your last node, after your loop.

Edit

I forgot something, by doing free(tmp), which have, in your post, the same value than q, you free the queue structure so you can't use it anymore in your code.

  • Thanks. Yes you're right, of course that is so... I'm not very experienced with C and I just assumed that it would be separate memory locations but I see now that it's just copying the pointers. However I tried your suggestion and I still get a segfault. – Alex Wicks Nov 16 '17 at 16:54
  • Can you post your printQueue after changing it ? – Thomas Blanquet Nov 16 '17 at 16:57
  • You're welcome, I advise you to draw on a paper your linked list and pointers when you try to manipulate it. Draw it by reading your code step by step with a simple exemple. It will allow you to see were your wrong (by modifyin wrong pointer or going to far in your list for exemple). – Thomas Blanquet Nov 16 '17 at 17:11
0

To fix the problem...

  1. I changed my tmp variable from a reference of the queue structure to a reference of the head node of the queue and iterated through the queue (tmp = tmp->next)

  2. I removed the line free(tmp) since it was freeing the location of the actual queue hence deleting part of my queue!

  3. I removed the extra printf() which was outside of the loop which I accidentally put there!

The code now looks like this:

void printQueue(queue *q){
    int iterator = 0;
    node *tmp = q->front;
    while(tmp != NULL){
        iterator += 1;
        printf("Queue node %d: data val %d ptr %p front ptr %p\n", iterator, tmp->data, tmp, tmp->next);
        tmp = tmp->next;
    }
}

Many thanks to Thomas Blanquet.

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