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I have a program in c++ that overload this operator >>. This operator is in charge of asking for a text entry cin >> My question is what do I have to do in case I have to use this same operator but for a ifstream entry.

EDITED with code

istream & operator >> (istream & Read, Person & ObjPers) {
     cout << "\ n \ n Enter name of Person:";
     Lee >> ObjPers.NomPers;
     cout << "\ n \ n Enter year of birth:";
     Read >> ObjPers.AnioNac;
     cout << "\ n \ nEnter place of birth:";
     Read >> ObjPers.LugNac;
     cout << "\ n \ nIs it alive ?:";
     Read >> ObjPers.Vive;
     return Read;
}

If I need use the same operator but with a different use as ifstream >> variable What I need do ?

EDIT2:

When I overload ostream << this happens:

   ostream & operator << (ostream & Write, Persona & ObjPers) {
    Write << "\ n \ nData of the Person \ n";
    Type << "\ nName:" << ObjPers.NomPers;
    Write << "\ nPlace of birth:" << ObjPers.LugNac;
    Write << "\ nYear of birth:" << ObjPers.AnioNac;
    if (ObjPers.live == 1)
    Write << "\ nIt is alive. \ N";
    else
    Write << "\ nNot alive. \ N";
         return Write;

    }

I when i try to use ofstream with << operator I can't the overloaded operator runs first

void BinaryTree <T> :: Save (NodeTree <T> * p, ofstream & out)
{
     if (p) {

        Save (p-> Sonleft, out);
         exit << p-> Info;

        Save (p-> SonRigth, out);

     }
     cout << endl;

}
4
  • Let's see your code. Commented Nov 16, 2017 at 23:03
  • Usually nothing. A stream is a stream. Commented Nov 16, 2017 at 23:11
  • I edit the post with a code Commented Nov 16, 2017 at 23:13
  • @MarcoLeslie std::istream is the base class for the stream classes. There is nothing you need to do. On that note, why didn't you simply try using a different stream? You would have seen it should have worked. Commented Nov 16, 2017 at 23:18

1 Answer 1

0

When you implement the operator>> function,

  1. Don't use std::cin or std::cout in its implementation.
  2. Assume that the user knows what to enter for such an object.
  3. Use fully qualified names for istream, i.e. use std::istream& Read insted of istream& Read.

My suggestion for your function:

std::istream& operator>>(std::istream& in, Person & ObjPers) {
   in >> ObjPers.NomPers;
   in >> ObjPers.AnioNac;
   in >> ObjPers.LugNac;
   in >> ObjPers.Vive;
   return in;
}

or combine the statements to one:

std::istream& operator>>(std::istream& in, Person & ObjPers) {
   return (in >> ObjPers.NomPers
              >> ObjPers.AnioNac
              >> ObjPers.LugNac
              >> ObjPers.Vive);
}
4
  • The problem is that when I try to use ifstream with the same operator >> the overload is executed Commented Nov 16, 2017 at 23:36
  • @MarcoLeslie, You make it sound like that's a drawback. From my point of view, that's expected and is good.
    – R Sahu
    Commented Nov 16, 2017 at 23:43
  • It's a problem because I need read from a file an when I try to read my program crash because the overload Commented Nov 17, 2017 at 0:10
  • 1
    @MarcoLeslie, that's a different problem. Perhaps you don't have the right data in the file, or not managing the ifstream object correctly. It's hard telling what the problem could be unless you post a minimal reproducible example.
    – R Sahu
    Commented Nov 17, 2017 at 0:12

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