1

Here is the data I need parsed:

--TABLE: PRICE_LIST


ITEM_DESCRIPTION VARCHAR2(60)  VENDOR_PARTNO VARCHAR2(15)
----------------------------   --------------------------
.374 x 3 w/ph KLT-6            5506125
.4375 x 3-1/2 w/ph KLT-3345    5506124
.125 x 2-1/2 w/ph KLT-3211     5506123
.3125 x 4-1/2 w/ph KUR-44      5506127

Here is the table I need to compare PRICE_LIST.ITEM_DESCRIPTION to:

--Table: MATERIALS
--COLUMN: VARCHAR2(20)

ITEM_ID 
--------------
1/2 X 3-1/2
5/16 X 4-1/2
1/8 X 2-1/2

I tried this approach to try and separate them, but this will require a lot of work:

SELECT SUBSTR(VALUE, 1, INSTR(VALUE, 'x')-1) DIAMETER,
       SUBSTR(VALUE, INSTR(VALUE, 'x')+1) DIRTY_LENGTH
       FROM (SELECT DESCRIPTION VALUE FROM PRICE_LIST);

DIAMETER    DIRTY_LENGTH
--------    ------------
.374        3 w/ph KLT-6
.4375       3-1/2 w/ph KLT-3345
.125        2-1/2 w/ph KLT-3211
.3125       4-1/2 w/ph KUR-44

But now I have a column with a decimal that I don't know what to do with, and another column that has my 2nd fraction but other data I don't need.

Because only the last 2 values in the PRICE_LIST table would match, what I want is to return only this:

ITEM_DESCRIPTION   VENDOR_PARTNO
----------------   -------------
1/8 X 2-1/2        5506123
5/16 X 4-1/2       5506127

Thanks for the help!

closed as too broad by Ken White, Bohemian Nov 18 '17 at 17:25

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • Why are you using such badly designed data? You should have a primary key that you can use to match, instead of mucking around with malformed data and sloppy string parsing and comparisons. You may want to buy a book or find a web tutorial on basic database design principles. – Ken White Nov 18 '17 at 1:47
  • Seems like first part of description might correspond to diameter(.125==1/4 etc). And, yes, data should be structured. Currently it is very difficult to understand and use. – igr Nov 18 '17 at 6:37
  • 1
    @KenWhite - I don't know the OP's specific situation. But, can you imagine a situation where this is existing data, in an organization that realized how idiotic their previous IT people were (just look at the data model), they fired all those incompetents, and instead hired the OP and others to deal with the mess? Of course, fix the data model, etc. How would you do that? Wouldn't you need to do EXACTLY what the OP is asking about? And if you needed help, wouldn't you ask here? – mathguy Nov 19 '17 at 15:53
  • @Bohemian - It would help if you could explain what was unclear or "too broad" about the question. It is crystal clear to me, and probably to many who work with Oracle, or with databases in general. Perhaps it wasn't clear to you (and to Ken White); it would help to understand WHAT was unclear. – mathguy Nov 19 '17 at 15:54
  • @mathguy: I'd create an intermediate table with a primary key that contained the two matching values. Look up one to find the match, and deal with the key as the ID. I certainly wouldn't be trying to parse text to find floating point numbers to try to convert to tractions to do text comparisons. – Ken White Nov 19 '17 at 16:55
1

The data format is awful. Seems you need to create a custom user definied PL/SQL function to evaluate these expressions:

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION evaluate_me( p_x VARCHAR2 )
RETURN NUMBER
DETERMINISTIC
IS
  x VARCHAR2( 200 );
  expr VARCHAR2(100);
  y NUMBER;
BEGIN
  x := lower( substr( p_x, 1, regexp_instr( p_x ||'q', '[^.0-9 xX\/\-]+' )-1));
  expr := replace( 'BEGIN :p:='|| x ||'; END;', 'x', '*' );
  execute immediate expr USING OUT y;
  RETURN y;
END;
/

and then do like in this example: http://sqlfiddle.com/#!4/c7681/2

select p.*, evaluate_me( item_description ) x
from PRICE_LIST p;

|            ITEM_DESCRIPTION | VENDOR_PARTNO |      X |
|-----------------------------|---------------|--------|
|         .374 x 3 w/ph KLT-6 |       5506125 |  1.122 |
| .4375 x 3-1/2 w/ph KLT-3345 |       5506124 | 0.8125 |
|  .125 x 2-1/2 w/ph KLT-3211 |       5506123 |  -0.25 |
|   .3125 x 4-1/2 w/ph KUR-44 |       5506127 |   0.75 |

select m.*, evaluate_me( item_id ) x
from MATERIALS m
;
|      ITEM_ID |     X |
|--------------|-------|
|  1/2 X 3-1/2 |     1 |
| 5/16 X 4-1/2 |  0.75 |
|  1/8 X 2-1/2 | -0.25 |

SELECT *
FROM PRICE_LIST p
JOIN MATERIALS m
ON evaluate_me( p.item_description ) = evaluate_me( m.item_id )
;

|           ITEM_DESCRIPTION | VENDOR_PARTNO |      ITEM_ID |
|----------------------------|---------------|--------------|
| .125 x 2-1/2 w/ph KLT-3211 |       5506123 |  1/8 X 2-1/2 |
|  .3125 x 4-1/2 w/ph KUR-44 |       5506127 | 5/16 X 4-1/2 |

This is expected to be extremally slow, the function will be called for each row of the left table and then for each row of the right table. So if the left table has for example 10,000 rows and the right table has 20,000 rows (not so much for RDBMS system), then the function will be called 10,000+10,000*20,000= 200,010,000 times.
It's a cost of a bad desing - the data doesn't follow rules of First Normal Form and must be parsed on each access.

In order to make the query faster, you have to create two functional indexes, otherwise when you start this query you can go on a monthly vacation:

CREATE INDEX MATERIALS_eval ON MATERIALS( evaluate_me( ITEM_ID ) );

CREATE INDEX PRICE_LIST_eval ON PRICE_LIST( evaluate_me( ITEM_DESCRIPTION ));
  • Thank you for taking the time to post this. I will test this out tomorrow back at the office and relay back. I agree the data is a total mess. It was poorly designed and maintained this way for 15 years. – Delbudge Nov 20 '17 at 1:16

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