It took me ages to understand that boxing/unboxing isn't a process of copying variable ['s value] from stack to heap but just the process of conversion between value<->reference. All of this because all the examples I saw were like:

int i = 12;
object o = i;
int j = (int)o;

Accompanied by a terrible graphs (in many different examples I saw they are the same) that looked like this:

enter image description here

which lead me to the wrong conclusion that boxing is the process of moving from stack to heap with value->reference conversion happening (and vice versa).

Now I understand it just the conversion process, itself but there are few nuances I need in-depth help with:

1. How does it looks in terms of memory schematics when boxing/unboxing happens with instance variables/class field?

By default, all these variables are already allocated in heap. Any examples of boxing in this scope and how does it behave? No need to draw it if you dont want, written explanation will do.

2. What happens here, for example:

int i = 12;
object o = 12; // boxing? if so - why?
int i = (int)o; // unboxing?
int k = (int)o; // Same?

3. If boxing/unboxing considered "bad" in terms of memory/performance - how do you handle it in cases where you cant do that? For example:

int i = 10;
ArrayList arrlst = new ArrayList();
arrlst.Add(i);
int j = (int)arrlst[0];

What the proper solution here besides "use generics" (non-applicable case, for example).

  • 2
    Terminology - there is no global variables in C#. This is just a member variable of the class program. Also I don't think this code compiles. i belongs to an instance of program and Main is a static method... Besides that, as for the use of i there is no real difference between the two code snippets. – Gilad Green Nov 18 '17 at 8:42
  • this.i.ToString() doesn't perform any boxing. That's got nothing to do with it being an instance field - it just doesn't need to box in order to call ToString(), because that's overridden in Int32. – Jon Skeet Nov 18 '17 at 9:06
  • Yeah, I know, I've rewritten question completely to try and make it clear what I'm struggling with (in fact, I've rewritten it 7 times after reading another article after article) – Digika Nov 18 '17 at 11:07
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Original Answer

Boxing/Unboxing is not moving to and from the heap, but about indirection. When the variable gets boxed what you get is a new object (ok, that is in heap, that is an implementation detail) that has a copy of the value.

Now, you take an the object and read one of its fields... what happens? You get a value. The implementation detail is that it is loaded in the stack[*] That value you get can be boxed (you can create a new object that holds a reference to it).

[*]: You would then, for example, call a method (or an operator) which will read its parameters from the stack (The semantics in MSIL are stack manipulation).

By the way, when you get the field and box it, what is in the box is a copy. Think about it, what you boxed came from the stack (you first copy it from the heap to the stack, then box it. At least that is the semantics in MSIL). Example:

void Main()
{
    var t = new test();
    t.boxme = 1;
    object box = t.boxme;
    t.boxme = 2;
    Console.WriteLine(box); // outputs 1
}

class test
{
    public int boxme;
}

Tested on LINQPad.


Extended Answer

Here I will go over the points in the edited question...

1. How does it looks in terms of memory schematics when boxing/unboxing happens with instance variables/class field?

By default, all these variables are already allocated in heap. Any examples of boxing in this scope and how does it behave? No need to draw it if you dont want, written explanation will do.

I get you want an explanation of how boxing works on an instance field. Since the code above demonstrates a use of box on an instance field, I will go over that code.

Before diving in the code I want to mention that I use the word "stack" because - as I said in the original answer - that is the semantics of the language. Yet, it does not have to be a literal stack in practice. The jitter will very likely optimize the code to take advantage of CPU registers. Therefore, when you see that I say that we put things in the stack to take them out right away... yeah, the jitter will probably use a register there. In fact, we will be placing some things on the stack repeatedly; the jitter may decide that it is worth to reuse a register for those things.

First off, we are using a very simple, not practical class test with a single field boxme:

class test
{
    public int boxme;
}

The only other thing I have to say about this class is remind you that the compiler will generate a constructor, which takes no parameters. With that in mind, let us go over the code in Main line by line...


var t = new test();

This line does two operations:

  • Call the constructor of the class test. It will create a new object on the heap and push a reference to it on the stack.
  • Set the local variable t to what we pop from the stack.

t.boxme = 1;

This line does three operations:

  • Push the value of the local variable t on top of the stack.
  • Push the value 1 on top of the stack.
  • Set the field boxme to a value popped from the stack (1) of an object to which we pop a reference from the stack.

object box = t.boxme;

As you may guess, this line is what we are for here. It does four operations total:

  • Push the value of the local variable t on top of the stack.
  • Push the value of the field boxme (of an object to which pop a reference from the stack) on top of the stack.
  • BOX: pop from the stack, copy the value (and the fact that it is an int) to a new object (created in the heap), push the reference to it on the stack.
  • Set the local variable box to what we pop from the stack.

t.boxme = 2;

Esentially the same as t.boxme = 1; but we push 2 instead of 1.

Console.WriteLine(box);
  • Push the value of the local variable box on top of the stack.
  • Call the method System.Console.WriteLine with whatever we pop from the stack as parameter.

The user sees "1".


2. What happens here, for example:

int i = 12;
object o = 12; // boxing? if so - why?
int i = (int)o; // unboxing?
int k = (int)o; // Same?

Yay, more code...


int i = 12;
  • Push the value 12 on top of the stack.
  • Set the local variable i to what we pop from the stack.

No surprises so far.


object o = 12; // boxing? if so - why?

Yes, boxing.

  • Push the value 12 on top of the stack.
  • BOX: pop from the stack, copy the value (and the fact that it is an int) to a new object (created in the heap), push the reference to it on the stack.
  • Set the local variable o to what we pop from the stack.

Why? Because the 32 bits which make the int look nothing like a reference type. If you want a reference type with the value of an int you need to put the value of int somewhere it can be referenced (put it on the heap) and then you can have your object.


int i = (int)o; // unboxing?

A local variable named 'i' is already defined in this scope

I think you mean:

i = (int)o; // unboxing?

Yes, unboxing.

  • Push the value of the local variable o on the top of the stack.
  • Unbox: read the value of the object we pop from the stack, and push that value on the stack.
  • Set the local variable i to what we pop from the stack.

int k = (int)o; // Same?

Yes. Just a different local variable.


3. If boxing/unboxing considered "bad" in terms of memory/performance - how do you handle it in cases where you cant do that? For example:

int i = 10;
ArrayList arrlst = new ArrayList();
arrlst.Add(i);
int j = (int)arrlst[0];

1. Use generics

int i = 10;
var arrlst = new List<T>();
arrlst.Add(i);
int j = arrlst[0];

I have to admit. Sometimes use generics is not the answer.

2. Use ref

C# 7.0 has ref return and locals should cover some cases were we needed boxing/unboxing in the past.

By using ref, what you pass is a reference to the value that is stored in stack. Since the idea of ref is that you can modify the original, using box, (copying the value to the heap) would defy its purpose.

3. Keep an eye on box lifespan

You may try to reuse your references instead of unnecessarily boxing the same value multiple times. That could help to keep the number of boxes low, and the garbage collector will pick on the fact that these are long-lived boxes and check them less often.

On the other hand, the garbage collector will deal very efficiently with short-lived boxes. Thus, if you cannot avoid making a lot of boxing/unboxing, try to make the boxes short lived.

4. Try using reference types

If you are having, performance problems because you have many long-lived boxes... you probably need to make some classes. If you are using reference types to begin with, there is no need to box them.

Although that can be problematic if you need structs for interop... hmm... probably not what you are looking for, but have a look at ref struct. Span<T> et. al. can save you allocations in other ways.

5. Let it be

If you cannot do it without boxing, you cannot do it without boxing.

For example, if you need a generic container that makes atomic operations on the members of the generic type... but you also need to allow the generic type to be a value type... what do you do then? Well, you got to initialize the container with the type object when you need to store some not atomic value type.

No, ref will not save you in that case, because ref does not guarantee atomicity.

Instead of working harder in getting a performance gain from optimizing the use of boxing/unboxing... look for other ways to improve the performance. For example, that generic container I was talking about can be expensive, but if it allows you to parallelize some algorithm and that gives you a performance boost greater than that cost, then it is justified.

  • Just out of curiosity, what happens to reference types inside boxed object? Do they point to the same object as the unboxed object? – FCin Nov 18 '17 at 9:17
  • @FCin: Do you mean if you have a custom struct that contains references? The references are copied at the point of boxing. If that isn't enough detail, it might be worth asking a new question with a concrete example. I suspect that while creating the example you'll answer your own question. – Jon Skeet Nov 18 '17 at 9:18
  • That's a lot to read and process, thanks – Digika Nov 18 '17 at 13:15

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