2

I'm using PHP 7.1.11

As mentioned in the PHP manual :

Heredocs can not be used for initializing class properties. Since PHP 5.3, this limitation is valid only for heredocs containing variables.

The above sentence is saying that class properties can not be initialized using heredoc syntax since PHP 5.3.

I'm using PHP 7.1.11 and initializing class property using heredoc syntax but I didn't get any error and the class property got initialized.

Why so?

Consider my below working code for it :

<!DOCTYPE HTML>
<html>
  <head>
    <title>Example</title>
  </head>
  <body>
  <?php
    class foo {
      public $bar = <<<EOT
                    barti
EOT;
    }

    $j = new foo();
    echo $j->bar;
  ?>
  </body>
</html>

The output of above code is

barti
4
  • 2
    Since PHP 5.3, this limitation is valid only for heredocs containing variables. Your example does not contain a variable so it doesnt count to the limitation mentioned. Nov 18, 2017 at 18:33
  • @ManuelMannhardt : Can you please prove this with some suitable working code example? What does actually mean by " heredocs containing variables"? Give me some example of such kind.
    – PHPLover
    Nov 18, 2017 at 18:35
  • 1
    @user2839497 I guess the example you're looking for would actually be non-working code in this case. Nov 18, 2017 at 18:36
  • 1
    I posted an answer, which also contains that "non-working" code. Nov 18, 2017 at 18:39

1 Answer 1

3

As your source already points out since PHP 5.3, this limitation is valid only for heredocs containing variables. Your example code does not contain any variables, so it works as designed.


However, what does not work is using variables in the heredoc like shown below:

    class foo {
      public $bar = <<<EOT
                    barti $someVariable // nor does {$someVariable}
EOT;
    }

    $j = new foo();
    echo $j->bar;

This throws an error:

Fatal error:  Constant expression contains invalid operations in [...]

NOTE

This 'issue' does not come from heredocs. You cant initialize any class property to the result of a function or variable. Just try it without heredoc:

class foo {

  public $bar = $test;
}

$j = new foo();
echo $j->bar;

Executing this code throws the exact same error.

3
  • Do you mean when variable/s is/are used in class property initialization with the heredoc syntax PHP will throw fatal error? But, if a normal variable is initialized with the heredoc syntax then PHP will not throw any error? In that case the variable(as well as escape sequence characters, if any) will get expand in between heredoc identifiers?
    – PHPLover
    Nov 18, 2017 at 18:47
  • 2
    Its not a heredoc (only) thing. You cant just set properties to a variable or the result of a function. I´ll add it in my answer Nov 18, 2017 at 18:50
  • I think this is a good place to note that a class constant can be initialized to include the value of an earlier defined class constant. For example const FOO = "not ".self::BAR works. It's the fact that variables are...well...variable that is the problem.
    – snoski
    Jul 23, 2023 at 23:55

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