64

Last week I learned that classes can be included in your project by writing an __autoload() function. Then I learned that using an autoloader isn't only a technique but also a pattern.

Now I'm using the autoloader in my project and I've found it very very useful. I was wondering if it could be possible to do the same thing with functions. It could be very useful to forget about including the right PHP file with functions inside it.

So, is it possible to create a function autoloader?

1

11 Answers 11

63

There is no function auto-loader for functions. You have four realistic solutions:

  1. Wrap all functions into namespacing classes (context appropriate). So let's say you have a function called string_get_letters. You could add that to a class called StringFunctions as a static function. So instead of calling string_get_letters(), you'd call StringFunctions::get_letters(). You would then __autoload those namespaced classes.

  2. Pre-load all functions. Since you're using classes, you shouldn't have that many functions, so just pre-load them.

  3. Load functions prior to using them. In each file, require_once the function files that are going to be used in that file.

  4. Don't use functions in the first place. If you are developing OOP code (which it seems like you are anyway), there should be little to no need for functions at all. Everything you would need a function (or multiple) for, you could build in a OO manner and avoid the need for functions.

Personally, I'd suggest either 1, 2 or 4 depending on your exact need and the quality and size of your codebase...

15
  • 5
    +1 Actually it's a good design pattern to gather common functions in classes with static methods such as StringUtils, WebHelpers, CollectionUtils, etc. So I'd go for option 1 or 4.
    – scoffey
    Jan 19, 2011 at 15:50
  • 70
    +1, but not everything that you might do via loose functions naturally translates to an OOP setting. What if you just want a utility method that normalizes a path format, or manipulates an array in a particular way? Don't try to shoehorn everything into an OO style :) Jan 19, 2011 at 16:01
  • 4
    @Alix: That's not a function, it's a method and it acts against classes. It does not enable lazy-loading, but calling non-existent methods. @Will: It's not shoehorning. If you need to maniuplate an array in a particular way, then either make it a protected/private member method on the class that needs it, or if it's generic enough add it to a utility class. It's not about shoehorning, it's about designing. Sure, you can shoehorn and wind up with unmaintainable code, but if you design properly you get the benefits of both worlds. But mixing loosely paradigms is almost never good...
    – ircmaxell
    Jan 19, 2011 at 16:04
  • 9
    @ircmaxell "if it's generic enough add it to a utility class" Such a utility class would just be a bag of miscellaneous things that would otherwise be written as independent functions. The only reason to do that is because PHP can't autoload functions. There's nothing OO about it.
    – Jesse
    Aug 21, 2015 at 11:43
  • 7
    @ircmaxell Err, true, but "It's not about shoehorning, it's about designing." seems to imply that there is some specifically design reason to move utility functions into a utility class, besides that it means PHP can autoload them.
    – Jesse
    Aug 21, 2015 at 12:01
40

If you are using Composer in your Project, you can add a files directive to the autoload section.

This will than actually generate a require_once in the autoloader, but it feels like real autoloading, because you dont have to take care of that.
Its not lazy loading though.

Example taken from Assetic:

"autoload": {
        "psr-0": { "Assetic": "src/" },
        "files": [ "src/functions.php" ]
    }
3
  • 1
    Thanks for pointing that out. See: Docs.
    – flu
    Mar 28, 2014 at 9:29
  • If you combine this with function namespacing (PHP 5.6+) then you have a neat solution IMHO (apart from the lazy loading aspect of course but then wiki.php.net/rfc/function_autoloading as proposed by @ircmaxell) Feb 3, 2016 at 11:50
  • 1
    spotted in guzzlehttp\psr7: ` "autoload": { "psr-4": { "GuzzleHttp\\Psr7\\": "src/" }, "files": ["src/functions_include.php"] } ` ...seems legit!
    – sfscs
    Jun 13, 2018 at 0:14
16

I read something a while back about an ugly hack that caught fatal errors and tried to include and execute the missing function(s), but I definitely wouldn't go that road.

The closest thing you have is the __call() magic method, which is sort of a __autoload() for methods, not functions. It might be good enough for your needs; if you can afford to call a class and require each different function separately. Since PHP 5.3.0, you also have __callStatic().

An example using __callStatic():

class Test
{
    public function __callStatic($m, $args)
    {
        if (function_exists($m) !== true)
        {
            if (is_file('./path/to/functions/' . $m . '.php') !== true)
            {
                return false;
            }

            require('./path/to/functions/' . $m . '.php');
        }

        return call_user_func_array($m, $args);
    }
}

Test::functionToLoad(1, 2, 3);

This would call the functionToLoad() function defined in ./path/to/functions/functionToLoad.php.

7
  • Yes, but you'd need to still prefix the call with a class name, so it's not really lazy-loading but intercepting the call (adding a stat and an additional method call to each and every function call). And it's not an autoload, but a fallback if it can't find the called method.
    – ircmaxell
    Jan 19, 2011 at 16:20
  • 2
    @ircmaxell: Following your line of though __autoload() also isn't an autoloader, just a fallback if it can't find the specified class...
    – Alix Axel
    Jan 19, 2011 at 16:22
  • That's true, but it's a language based fallback for that particular context (classes). I'm not saying it's "wrong" to do it this way, just that realize that doing something like this is a slight abuse of the system... But it's not "bad" (aside from checking if the file exists prior to the function exists, and other tiny inefficiencies that border on micro-optimizations)...
    – ircmaxell
    Jan 19, 2011 at 16:25
  • @ircmaxell: Yeah, I was fixing that. =)
    – Alix Axel
    Jan 19, 2011 at 16:26
  • 2
    This works, except when it doesn't. Returning references (in-often as you do) fails with this. There are some other caveats; I'll try to dig through my own questions, I think I had one about this.
    – Dan Lugg
    Jan 20, 2014 at 13:07
8

Well, as usual there is a PECL extension for that:

(via: http://phk.tekwire.net/joomla/support/doc/automap.htm)

It's supposed to autoload functions as well as classes. Which however doesn't work with the current PHP interpreter yet.

(An alternative option btw, is generating stub functions that load and run namespaced counterparts.)

That being said. Autoloading is not universally considered a good practice. It leads to overly fractured class hierarchies and object happiness. And the real reason PHP has autoloading is because include and dependency management systems are inmature.

0
2
namespace MyNamespace;

class Fn {

    private function __construct() {}
    private function __wakeup() {}
    private function __clone() {}

    public static function __callStatic($fn, $args) {
        if (!function_exists($fn)) {
            $fn = "YOUR_FUNCTIONS_NAMESPACE\\$fn";
            require str_replace('\\', '/', $fn) . '.php';
        }
        return call_user_func_array($fn, $args);
    }

}

And using namespaces, we can do: Fn::myFunc() and spl_autoload_register(). I've used this code with examples at: https://goo.gl/8dMIMj

3
  • 1
    What exactly are you trying to contribute to the question? When posting answers, ask yourself "If I removed the link in this answer (if any) would the answer still make sense, and be helpful" If the answer is no, then change the answer to add key-points of the link in your answer
    – Jojodmo
    Mar 15, 2014 at 3:29
  • 1
    very smart solution to me, i like it very much. Unfortunately, in my case i m having namespaced functions. Without class. And thus, this solution does not do the work. I m afraid we shall wait 1 year more given that rfc which targets php 7.1 wiki.php.net/rfc/function_autoloading. Sorry to say that but what a shame.... : [ This say for now on best solution is to rely on composer capabilities, i guess.
    – user4466350
    Sep 6, 2015 at 2:05
  • Yes, I think for now the only reliable way to go is Composer autload features. But you can use it with namespaced functions also; the only thing to do is to notice call_user_func_array (used in the code) also handles what you want. Sep 18, 2015 at 19:43
2

I use a Class and __invoke. The __invoke method is called when a script calls a class as a function. I often do something like this:

<?php

namespace API\Config;

class Slim {
  function __invoke() {
    return [
      'settings' => [
        'displayErrorDetails' => true,
        'logger' => [
          'name' => 'api',
          'level' => Monolog\Logger\Logger::DEBUG,
          'path' => __DIR__ . '/../../logs/api.log',
        ],
      ]
    ];
  }
}

I can then call like a function:

$config = API\Config\Slim;
$app = Slim\App($config())
2
  • The unfortunate thing is that PHP does not support this syntax w/o creating a same-named function which, of course, cannot be autoloaded: Slim\App(API\Config\Slim()) Dec 1, 2019 at 22:20
  • How do you invoke Slim if you didn't create the instance with new Slim() first? Does PHP allow invoking a class?
    – tonix
    Sep 22, 2020 at 14:10
1

new Functions\Debug() will load functions to root namespace.

namespace Functions
{

    class Debug
    {
    }
}
namespace
{

    if (! function_exists('printr')) {

        /**
         *
         * @param mixed $expression
         */
        function printr()
        {
            foreach (func_get_args() as $v) {
                if (is_scalar($v)) {
                    echo $v . "\n";
                } else {
                    print_r($v);
                }
            }
            exit();
        }
    }
}
0

Here is another rather complex example, based on the suggestions in this discussion. The code can also be seen here: lib/btr.php

<?php
/**
 * A class that is used to autoload library functions.
 *
 * If the function btr::some_function_name() is called, this class
 * will convert it into a call to the function
 * 'BTranslator\some_function_name()'. If such a function is not
 * declared then it will try to load these files (in this order):
 *   - fn/some_function_name.php
 *   - fn/some_function.php
 *   - fn/some.php
 *   - fn/some/function_name.php
 *   - fn/some/function.php
 *   - fn/some/function/name.php
 * The first file that is found will be loaded (with require_once()).
 *
 * For the big functions it makes more sense to declare each one of them in a
 * separate file, and for the small functions it makes more sense to declare
 * several of them in the same file (which is named as the common prefix of
 * these files). If there is a big number of functions, it can be more
 * suitable to organize them in subdirectories.
 *
 * See: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/4737199/autoloader-for-functions
 */
class btr {
  /**
   * Make it TRUE to output debug info on '/tmp/btr.log'.
   */
  const DEBUG = FALSE;

  /**
   * The namespace of the functions.
   */
  const NS = 'BTranslator';

  /**
   * Relative directory where the functions are located.
   */
  const FN = 'fn';

  private function __construct() {}
  private function __wakeup() {}
  private function __clone() {}

  /**
   * Return the full name (with namespace) of the function to be called.
   */
  protected static function function_name($function) {
    return self::NS . '\\' . $function;
  }

  /**
   * Return the full path of the file to be loaded (with require_once).
   */
  protected static function file($fname) {
    return dirname(__FILE__) . '/' . self::FN . '/' . $fname . '.php';
  }

  /**
   * If a function does not exist, try to load it from the proper file.
   */
  public static function __callStatic($function, $args) {
    $btr_function = self::function_name($function);
    if (!function_exists($btr_function)) {
      // Try to load the file that contains the function.
      if (!self::load_search_dirs($function) or !function_exists($btr_function)) {
        $dir = dirname(self::file($fname));
        $dir = str_replace(DRUPAL_ROOT, '', $dir);
        throw new Exception("Function $btr_function could not be found on $dir");
      }
    }
    return call_user_func_array($btr_function, $args);
  }

  /**
   * Try to load files from subdirectories
   * (by replacing '_' with '/' in the function name).
   */
  protected static function load_search_dirs($fname) {
    do {
      self::debug($fname);
      if (file_exists(self::file($fname))) {
        require_once(self::file($fname));
        return TRUE;
      }
      if (self::load_search_files($fname)) {
        return TRUE;
      }
      $fname1 = $fname;
      $fname = preg_replace('#_#', '/', $fname, 1);
    } while ($fname != $fname1);

    return FALSE;
  }

  /**
   * Try to load files from different file names
   * (by removing the part after the last undescore in the functin name).
   */
  protected static function load_search_files($fname) {
    $fname1 = $fname;
    $fname = preg_replace('/_[^_]*$/', '', $fname);
    while ($fname != $fname1) {
      self::debug($fname);
      if (file_exists(self::file($fname))) {
        require_once(self::file($fname));
        return TRUE;
      }
      $fname1 = $fname;
      $fname = preg_replace('/_[^_]*$/', '', $fname);
    }

    return FALSE;
  }

  /**
   * Debug the order in which the files are tried to be loaded.
   */
  public static function debug($fname) {
    if (!self::DEBUG) {
      return;
    }
    $file = self::file($fname);
    $file = str_replace(DRUPAL_ROOT, '', $file);
    self::log($file, 'Autoload');
  }

  /**
   * Output the given parameter to a log file (useful for debugging).
   */
  public static function log($var, $comment ='') {
    $file = '/tmp/btr.log';
    $content = "\n==> $comment: " . print_r($var, true);
    file_put_contents($file, $content, FILE_APPEND);
  }
}
0

While you can't autoload functions and constants, you can use something like jesseschalken/autoload-generator which will automatically detect what files contain things which can't be autoloaded and load them eagerly.

0

Include all functions file in one file and then include it

//File 1
db_fct.php

//File 2
util_fct.php

//In a functions.php include all other files

<?php

require_once 'db_fct.php';
require_once 'util_fct.php';
?>

Include functions.php whenever you need functions ..

3
  • In a solid development team, your balls would be ripped of for naming files like util_fct.php
    – jirig
    Sep 27, 2017 at 19:23
  • @jirigracik How should we name them ? and Why ?
    – Az.Youness
    Oct 2, 2017 at 12:49
  • 1
    You should not use plain functions in first place. Anyways, there you should name the file so everyone knows, what does it contain. DatabaseFunctions.php or Functions\Database.php might do it. Utilities is not a good name because it can be anything. You should rather use specific names (string functions, array functions, database functions, ...). I think you get the idea.
    – jirig
    Oct 2, 2017 at 14:19
-2

try this

if ($handle = opendir('functions')) {
    while (false !== ($entry = readdir($handle))) {
        if (strpos($entry, '.php') !== false) {
            include("functions/$entry");
        }
    }
    closedir($handle);
}
1
  • 3
    First, you should follow SO guidelines. Answers should barely ever entirely consist of code. Second, this does not provide an autoloader as it exists for classes. This snippet just loads all PHP files within a directory. Therefore, this does not answer the question.
    – Tobias
    May 20, 2015 at 19:47

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