5

I am getting 11 or 12 of 15 correct in a Python course on edX.org each time I submit, but not getting much help from anyone in the discussions because no one can really post any code there (not really helpful) and there doesn't seem to be any available support staff to speak with from the course, which I would pay for, so I am posting here. I was about to pay someone to tutor me but no one is available right now, and I am under some pressure to get this course done by December for my job.

This is the assignment:

Now write a program that calculates the minimum fixed monthly payment needed in order pay off a credit card balance within 12 months. By a fixed monthly payment, we mean a single number which does not change each month, but instead is a constant amount that will be paid each month.

In this problem, we will not be dealing with a minimum monthly payment rate.

The following variables contain values as described below:

balance - the outstanding balance on the credit card

annualInterestRate - annual interest rate as a decimal

The program should print out one line: the lowest monthly payment that will pay off all debt in under 1 year, for example:

Lowest Payment: 180
Assume that the interest is compounded monthly according to the balance at the end of the month (after the payment for that month is made). The monthly payment must be a multiple of $10 and is the same for all months. Notice that it is possible for the balance to become negative using this payment scheme, which is okay. A summary of the required math is found below:

Monthly interest rate = (Annual interest rate) / 12.0
Monthly unpaid balance = (Previous balance) - (Minimum fixed monthly payment)
Updated balance each month = (Monthly unpaid balance) + (Monthly interest rate x Monthly unpaid balance)

This is my code:

#! /usr/bin/python3.6

from math import ceil

def roundup(x):
    return int(ceil(x / 10.0) * 10)

def getFixedPayment(balance,annualInterestRate,counter=12):

    totalLoan = balance + (balance*annualInterestRate)
    monthlyPayment = roundup(totalLoan/12.0)
    newBalance = totalLoan - monthlyPayment
    if counter < 12:
        newPayment = newBalance / counter + 1
    else:
        newPayment = newBalance / counter

    if counter == 1:
        return roundup(newPayment/12)
    else:
        return getFixedPayment(balance,annualInterestRate,counter-1)


#balance = 3329
#annualInterestRate = 0.2
print('Lowest Payment: ' + str(getFixedPayment(balance,annualInterestRate)))

Here are the test results: (I have here all 15, so you might be able to identify a pattern I can't see. The ones marked "ERROR" are the ones I got incorrect)

Test Case 1
balance = 3329; annualInterestRate = 0.2
Output:
Lowest Payment: 310

Test Case 2
balance = 4773; annualInterestRate = 0.2
Output:
Lowest Payment: 440

Test Case 3
balance = 3926; annualInterestRate = 0.2
Output:
Lowest Payment: 360

Randomized Test Case 1
balance = 265; annualInterestRate = 0.18
Output:
Lowest Payment: 30

Randomized Test Case 2
balance = 263; annualInterestRate = 0.18
Output:
Lowest Payment: 30

Randomized Test Case 3
balance = 317; annualInterestRate = 0.25
Output:
Lowest Payment: 30

Randomized Test Case 4
balance = 720; annualInterestRate = 0.2
Output:
Lowest Payment: 70

Randomized Test Case 5
balance = 4284; annualInterestRate = 0.2
Output:
Lowest Payment: 400

Randomized Test Case 6
balance = 3834; annualInterestRate = 0.15
Your output:
Lowest Payment: 340


*** ERROR: Expected Lowest Payment: 350

, but got Lowest Payment: 340

 ***
Correct output:
Lowest Payment: 350

Randomized Test Case 7
balance = 3045; annualInterestRate = 0.18
Output:
Lowest Payment: 280

Randomized Test Case 8
balance = 4461; annualInterestRate = 0.2
Output:
Lowest Payment: 410

Randomized Test Case 9
balance = 4657; annualInterestRate = 0.04
Your output:
Lowest Payment: 370


*** ERROR: Expected Lowest Payment: 400

, but got Lowest Payment: 370

 ***
Correct output:
Lowest Payment: 400

Randomized Test Case 10
balance = 3395; annualInterestRate = 0.2
Your output:
Lowest Payment: 320


*** ERROR: Expected Lowest Payment: 310

, but got Lowest Payment: 320

 ***
Correct output:
Lowest Payment: 310

Randomized Test Case 11
balance = 4045; annualInterestRate = 0.15
Your output:
Lowest Payment: 360


*** ERROR: Expected Lowest Payment: 370

, but got Lowest Payment: 360

 ***
Correct output:
Lowest Payment: 370

Randomized Test Case 12
balance = 3963; annualInterestRate = 0.18
Output:
Lowest Payment: 360
  • When you do the error cases by hand, do you get the right answer? – Carlos Nov 19 '17 at 9:33
  • It's hit or miss just like the grader. – Debug255 Nov 19 '17 at 9:35
  • Are you satisfied that you know what the answer is supposed to be? – Carlos Nov 19 '17 at 9:47
  • Hi Carlos, no, not really. That was a printout from my results. Except for the 1st 3 results, these are randomized results from the courses grader. – Debug255 Nov 19 '17 at 9:49
  • 2
    I find it fascinating how this question comes with specs, own attempt and a complete suite of test cases and still somebody wants to close it for the "why isn't this code working?" reason. – timgeb Nov 19 '17 at 10:40
3

Although the function is recursive (it calls itself), it does so in a pointless, ineffective way.

Consider what happens for any value of the counter when greater than 1:

def getFixedPayment(balance, annualInterestRate, counter=12):
    totalLoan = balance + (balance*annualInterestRate)
    monthlyPayment = roundup(totalLoan/12.0)
    newBalance = totalLoan - monthlyPayment

    if counter < 12:
        newPayment = newBalance / counter + 1
    else:
        newPayment = newBalance / counter

    if counter == 1:
        return roundup(newPayment/12)
    else:
        return getFixedPayment(balance,annualInterestRate,counter-1)
        #                                                 ^^^^^^^^^
        #                                                 the only change!

When counter > 1, the function "does some calculations", but it doesn't matter, because in the end it just calls itself with counter - 1. So for a starting value of counter = 12, the function will repeatedly call itself 11 times for nothing. As such it reduces to this:

def getFixedPayment(balance, annualInterestRate):
    totalLoan = balance + (balance*annualInterestRate)
    monthlyPayment = roundup(totalLoan/12.0)
    newBalance = totalLoan - monthlyPayment

    newPayment = newBalance / counter + 1

    return roundup(newPayment/12)

Can this possibly give correct answer? Not likely.

Consider how the repayment works. Let's take a simpler example of repaying something in 3 steps, and consider this alternative notation so it's simpler to write:

  • Let's call T the total amount to pay today
  • Let's call r the multiplier of the annual interest rate, that is for a 4% annual interest rate, this value will be 1.04, so we can get the amount that needs to be paid by T * r.
  • Let's call x the target fixed monthly payment

After we pay x this month, how much will be left to repay?

(T - x) * r

That is, we pay x this month, the remaining amount is T - x, and as per the description we need to multiply with the annual interest rate.

Next month, we pay x again, so what's left to repay will be:

((T - x) * r - x) * r

In the third month we make the last payment of x.

The target of the exercise is to find the x such that:

((T - x) * r - x) * r - x <= 0

Let's reorganize this equation to find the value of x:

((T - x) * r - x) * r <= x

(T - x) * r - x <= x / r

(T - x) * r <= x / r + x

T - x <= x / r / r + x / r

T <= x / r / r + x / r + x

T <= x * (1 / r / r + 1 / r + 1)

T / (1 / r / r + 1 / r + 1) <= x

In this example we repay in 3 months. You can see how this formula changes by adding one month:

T / (1 / r / r / r + 1 / r / r + 1 / r + 1) <= x

That is, given T / m, adding one month means T / (m / r + 1).

Now that looks like a recursive logic we can use.

Without completely spoiling the exercise for you, here's a template of the solution where you just need to figure out the correct values for the .... Good luck!

def getFixedPayment(balance, annual_interest_rate, counter=12, interest=...):

    if counter == 1:
        return roundup(balance / interest)

    monthly_interest_rate = annual_interest_rate / 12
    r = 1 + monthly_interest_rate

    return getFixedPayment(balance, annual_interest_rate, counter - 1, ...)

And here are some doctests to verify your solution. If your program is in a file called calc.py, you can run the doctests with python -mdoctest calc.py. It will print a summary of the failing test cases if any, or it will print nothing if all good.

def getFixedPayment(balance, annual_interest_rate, counter=12, interest=...):
    """
    >>> getFixedPayment(3329, 0.2)
    310

    >>> getFixedPayment(4773, 0.2)
    440

    >>> getFixedPayment(3926, 0.2)
    360

    >>> getFixedPayment(265, 0.18)
    30

    >>> getFixedPayment(263, 0.18)
    30

    >>> getFixedPayment(317, 0.25)
    30

    >>> getFixedPayment(720, 0.2)
    70

    >>> getFixedPayment(4284, 0.2)
    400

    >>> getFixedPayment(3834, 0.15)
    350

    >>> getFixedPayment(3045, 0.18)
    280

    >>> getFixedPayment(4461, 0.2)
    410

    >>> getFixedPayment(4657, 0.04)
    400

    >>> getFixedPayment(3395, 0.2)
    310

    >>> getFixedPayment(4045, 0.15)
    370

    >>> getFixedPayment(3963, 0.18)
    360

    """

    if counter == 1:
        return roundup(balance / interest)

    monthly_interest_rate = annual_interest_rate / 12
    r = 1 + monthly_interest_rate

    return getFixedPayment(balance, annual_interest_rate, counter - 1, ...)
  • Thanks for the doctest, I could validate my answer with it. – Eric Duminil Nov 19 '17 at 10:32
  • Didn't know about that. Very handy. In my py file, I manually wrote out my own doctest using if statements. This is much more efficient. – Debug255 Nov 19 '17 at 10:42
2

One problem is that:

Assume that the interest is compounded monthly

but you calculate:

totalLoan = balance + (balance*annualInterestRate)

You cannot calculate the totalLoan that way. You should take compound interest into account, and calculate the unpaid balance each month.

Naive approach

Here's an example. Note that your recursion can be replaced by a simple loop:

def balance_after_a_year(balance, monthly_payment, annual_interest_rate):
    monthly_interest_rate = annual_interest_rate / 12.0
    for month in range(12):
        balance = (balance - monthly_payment) * (1 + monthly_interest_rate)
    return balance

print(balance_after_a_year(3834, 340, 0.15))
# 23.153402858591026
print(balance_after_a_year(3834, 350, 0.15))
# -107.05775649703746

You can now use this function in a naive way. Simply iterate from 0 to balance in steps of 10, and pick the first value for which the balance after a year is negative:

def getFixedPayment(b,r):
    return next(m for m in range(0, b, 10) if balance_after_a_year(b, m, r) <= 0)
print(getFixedPayment(3834, 0.15))
# 350

This method has been validated with doctest provided by @janos.

There are more efficient methods but this one is simple and concise.

Monthly payment formula

You can calculate the montly payment directly with the monthly payment formula:

def getFixedPayment(b,r):
    m = r / 12.0
    return m * b / (1 - (1 + m)**-12)
print(getFixedPayment(3834, 0.15))
# 346.05036953133276

No need for any loop!

  • Yes, I agree. Iteration is very nice. The course is wanting recursion, as the previous lessons were about recursion. Thank you for adding that point about calculating compound interest. I appreciate it. I was confused. The previous question had me find the minimum monthly payment. This question said "In this problem, we will not be dealing with a minimum monthly payment rate.", so this threw me off a bit. Thank you again. – Debug255 Nov 19 '17 at 10:40
  • 1
    @Debug255: To be honest, I don't understand this sentence. Maybe they mean that it's not exactly the minimum monthly payment, but that it has been rounded? Recursion can be a very powerful tool, but it really isn't needed here. – Eric Duminil Nov 19 '17 at 10:45
  • I agree with you 100%. it is my understanding that in Python, recursion uses the stack, and iteration uses the heap. Is that correct? If so, iteration is also more efficient for the system. – Debug255 Nov 19 '17 at 10:47

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.