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I'm trying to send data from Qt to R. I am new to the QtNetwork module and relatively new to Qt overall. As such I am also trying to figure out how QIODevice encodes data for the purposes of reading and writing.

If I run the Fortune Server Example and connect to it with the following code in R:

connection <- socketConnection(host="localhost", port=50743, open="rb", timeout=10)
readBin(connection, what="raw", n = 1000)

the following raw hexadecimal vector is returned

00 00 00 56 00 59 00 6f 00 75 00 20 00 77 00 69 00 6c 00 6c 00 20 00 66 00 65 00 65 00 6c 00 20 00 68 00 75 00 6e 00 67 00 72 00 79 00 20 00 61 00 67 00 61 00 69 00 6e 00 20 00 69 00 6e 00 20 00 61 00 6e 00 6f 00 74 00 68 00 65 00 72 00 20 00 68 00 6f 00 75 00 72 00 2e

Removing the first five bytes and all the remaining null characters and converting to char I get:

"You will feel hungry again in another hour."

So what I want to know is where do all the characters that are not part of the fortune come from? The fourth byte seems to be the byte length of the message from the sixth byte to the end, the rest of the "non-fortune" characters are all null.

I read that QByteArray terminates each byte with a null character and QByteArray is converted to a QBuffer before being written by QTcpSocket, is that what is happening here? QBuffer adds the length of the message (but what of the other four bytes) and every second byte of a QByteArray is the null character? Also, the last byte is not null (did the readBin operation consume it/ how did readBin know where the message ended)?

Is this the only way to write data to the socket? If I wanted to transmit values of type double would I have to convert them to QByteArray to transmit them in this fashion? Is there not some non-text way of transmitting data through a socket?

Any enlightenment would be much appreciated!

EDIT:

Thanks for the answer! For completeness sake here is how you might decode the string in R

connection <- socketConnection(host="localhost", port=50743, open="rb", timeout=10)

# Read first 32 bits, which contains the size of the string in bytes
len.raw <- readBin(connection, what="raw", n = 4)

# convert to integer
len <- strtoi(paste(c("0x",len.raw),collapse=""))

# Read raw message
msg.raw <- readBin(connection, what="raw", n = len)

# convert to char using UTF-16BE
msg <- iconv(list(msg.raw),from="UTF-16BE")

close(connection)

cat(msg)
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If you take a look at how the Fortune Server Example is implemented, you can see that it uses QDataStream to serialize fortunes (QStrings) over the socket:

QByteArray block;
QDataStream out(&block, QIODevice::WriteOnly);
out.setVersion(QDataStream::Qt_4_0);

out << fortunes.at(qrand() % fortunes.size());

So, the question is reduced to "How does QDataStream serialize QStrings?", and this is answered extensively in the documentation page about serializing Qt data types. You can see that a QString's serialization looks like this:

  • If the string is null: 0xFFFFFFFF (quint32)
  • Otherwise: The string length in bytes (quint32) followed by the data in UTF-16

And this is exactly what you are seeing in your question. The first four bytes are the string length in bytes, and the "nulls" you are seeing later appear because of using UTF-16 encoding.


Is this the only way to write data to the socket? If I wanted to transmit values of type double would I have to convert them to QByteArray to transmit them in this fashion? Is there not some non-text way of transmitting data through a socket?

You can use any serialization format you like. QDataStream is widely used in Qt since it supports most Qt data types out of the box. This has nothing to do with using QByteArray, you can let QDataStream write to the socket directly. QDataStream is, actually, a binary format (non-text) as you can see. If want textual human-readable formats, you can use JSON.

But if you are aiming to send data from Qt to R using QDataStream, you'll have to write your QDataStream deserializer for R. I would recommend using some common data serialization that has implementations in C++ and R (in lieu of re-inventing the wheel). I believe JSON meets this criterion, and if you want to use a binary format, msgpack might be interesting for you, since it supports a lot of programming languages (including R and C++).

  • Thanks for this, it's a huge help. Especially as in my case where you don't know what you are looking for. – byrongibby Nov 20 '17 at 21:54

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