2

I have this HTML setup:

<div class="one">
    <div class="text">One</div>
    <div class="text">One</div>
</div>

<div class="two">
    <div class="text">Two</div>
    <div class="text">Two</div>
</div>

I want to move the content of div .two into .one using pure javascript (not jQuery) so we get:

<div class="one">
    <div class="text">One</div>
    <div class="text">One</div>
    <div class="text">Two</div>
    <div class="text">Two</div>
</div>

What is the best way to do this with millisecond performance in mind?

  • possible duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/6329108/… – swetansh kumar Nov 21 '17 at 11:21
  • 1
    I came across that Q&A too, but I think this question stands on its own (with the micro-performance in consideration). – Gary Woods Nov 21 '17 at 11:21
  • Give div id 1,2 and use javascript : document.getElementById('1').appendChild( document.getElementById('2') ); tried it?? – Md Shifatul Islam Nov 21 '17 at 11:26
  • Will these elements have event handlers attached to them before they are moved? – Yoshi Nov 21 '17 at 11:50
  • @Yoshi Yes they will. – Henrik Petterson Nov 21 '17 at 11:51
4

I personally prefer insertAdjacentElement as it gives you more control as to where to put elements, but be careful to take note of its browser support.

const one = document.querySelector('.one');
const two = document.querySelector('.two');

[...two.children].forEach(element => {
  one.insertAdjacentElement('beforeEnd', element);
});
<div class="one">
    <div class="text">One</div>
    <div class="text">One</div>
</div>

<div class="two">
    <div class="text">Two</div>
    <div class="text">Two</div>
</div>

Also note that I've used ES2015 syntax.

3

The possible duplicate question actually has a native answer - use .appendChild() to move the nodes.

In your case, the code would look like this:

var one = document.querySelector(".one");
var children = document.querySelector(".two").children;

Array.prototype.forEach.call(children, function (child) {
    one.appendChild(child);
});

You can loop over it with a while loop and use a DocumentFragment if you're after the performance boost.

var one = document.querySelector(".one");
var children = document.querySelector(".two").children;
var frag = document.createDocumentFragment();

while (children.length) {
    frag.appendChild(children[0]);
}

one.appendChild(frag);

Faster solution (source):

var one = document.querySelector(".one");
var children = [...document.querySelector(".two").children];
var frag = document.createDocumentFragment();
var i = 0;
var il = children.length;

while (i < il) {
    frag.appendChild(children[i]);
    i += 1;
}

one.appendChild(frag);
  • 1
    Lovely! Any chance of doing a performance comparison to evolutionxbox's answer since both vary in approach? – Henrik Petterson Nov 21 '17 at 11:37
  • 2
    These elements do have event handlers attached to them. Will this solution still work? Thank you for the tests. – Henrik Petterson Nov 21 '17 at 11:52
  • 1
    @HenrikPetterson yes - appendChild will retain event listeners (I imagine insertAdjacentElement will as well, but I've not tested it). innerHTML will not unless you delegate your events – James Long Nov 21 '17 at 11:53
  • 1
    @HenrikPetterson - there's not much in it, but evolutionbox's seems to be faster every now and again. If the speed is important, test both solutions with real data rather than this demo, but the numbers seem to be hinting that evolutionbox's solution will win – James Long Nov 21 '17 at 11:56
  • 2
    @JamesLong I wouldn't have guessed that either. – evolutionxbox Nov 21 '17 at 12:20

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