51

I am trying to declare a variable in a react-js class. The variable should be accessible in different functions. This is my code

class MyContainer extends Component {
    constructor(props) {
        super(props);
        this.testVariable= "this is a test";  // I declare the variable here
    }
    onMove() {
        console.log(this.testVariable); //I try to access it here
    }
}

On onMove, the value of this.testVariable is undefined. I Know that I could put the value on the state but I don't want to do it because each time the value changes, render() will be called which is not necessary. I am new to react, did I make something wrong?

2
  • You never created a variable named test, you created testVarible. – Jerodev Nov 21 '17 at 15:56
  • 2
    You can call this.onMove.bind(this); inside the render or constructor. – Gamsh Nov 21 '17 at 16:14
84

Using ES6 syntax in React does not bind this to user-defined functions however it will bind this to the component lifecycle methods.

So the function that you declared will not have the same context as the class and trying to access this will not give you what you are expecting.

For getting the context of class you have to bind the context of class to the function or use arrow functions.

Method 1 to bind the context:

class MyContainer extends Component {

    constructor(props) {
        super(props);
        this.onMove = this.onMove.bind(this);
        this.testVarible= "this is a test";
    }

    onMove() {
        console.log(this.testVarible);
    }
}

Method 2 to bind the context:

class MyContainer extends Component {

    constructor(props) {
        super(props);
        this.testVarible= "this is a test";
    }

    onMove = () => {
        console.log(this.testVarible);
    }
}

Method 2 is my preferred way but you are free to choose your own.

Update: You can also create the properties on class without constructor:

class MyContainer extends Component {

    testVarible= "this is a test";

    onMove = () => {
        console.log(this.testVarible);
    }
}

Note If you want to update the view as well, you should use state and setState method when you set or change the value.

Example:

class MyContainer extends Component {

    state = { testVarible: "this is a test" };

    onMove = () => {
        console.log(this.state.testVarible);
        this.setState({ testVarible: "new value" });
    }
}
4
  • Can we set the value of this value in some other method like this.testVariable = "New Test" ? – Shubham Ojha Oct 22 '18 at 7:53
  • 1
    Yes, you can set the values on this in any function. Just make sure that the function has the context as of the class. @ShubhamOjha – Brijesh Bhakta Oct 23 '18 at 4:58
  • @BrijeshBhakta how the view will look like then ? – user123456 Feb 13 at 10:37
  • @user123456 not sure if I understand your question but if you are asking what will be the value of testVariable after setState method is called, it will be "new value" – Brijesh Bhakta Feb 15 at 17:03
6

Assuming that onMove is an event handler, it is likely that its context is something other than the instance of MyContainer, i.e. this points to something different.

You can manually bind the context of the function during the construction of the instance via Function.bind:

class MyContainer extends Component {
  constructor(props) {
    super(props);

    this.onMove = this.onMove.bind(this);

    this.test = "this is a test";
  }

  onMove() {
    console.log(this.test);
  }
}

Also, test !== testVariable.

6
  • 1
    console.log(this.testVariable) ;) – Leonard Lepadatu Nov 21 '17 at 15:57
  • 1
    @LeonardLepadatu Thanks, almost missed that :) – Timo Nov 21 '17 at 15:59
  • or can use most elegant const onMove = (e) => {console.log('foo')} and avoid to add this.onMove = this.onMove.bind(this); in constructor – Leonard Lepadatu Nov 21 '17 at 16:05
  • I don't get the point and I get an error "Syntex error: Unexpected token" after the "const" – user567 Nov 21 '17 at 16:09
  • without const, sorry! The point is to simplify the handling events. – Leonard Lepadatu Nov 21 '17 at 16:19

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