Should be very simple, but I can't cope with it.

I want to match exactly the same number of as as bs. So, the following

my $input = 'aaabbbb';
$input ~~ m:ex/ ... /;

should produce:

aaabbb
aabb
ab

UPD: The following variants don't work, perhaps because of the :ex bug , mentioned in @smls's answer (but more likely because I made some mistakes?):

> my $input = "aaabbbb";
> .put for $input ~~ m:ex/ (a) * (b) * <?{ +$0 == +$1 }> /;
Nil
> .put for $input ~~ m:ex/ (a) + (b) + <?{+$0 == +$1}> /;
Nil

This one, with :ov and ?, works:

> my $input = "aaabbbb";
> .put for $input ~~ m:ov/ (a)+ (b)+? <?{+$0 == +$1}> /;
aaabbb
aabb
ab

UPD2: The following solution works with :ex as well, but I had to do it without <?...> assertion.

> $input = 'aaabbbb'
> $input ~~ m:ex/ (a) + (b) + { put $/ if +$0 == +$1 } /;
aaabbb
aabb
ab
  • 1
    May I ask you what you are doing? I mean, in general. All these regex questions... – Holli Nov 21 '17 at 22:30
  • @Holli Do you mean it's too stupid? – Eugene Barsky Nov 21 '17 at 22:32
  • 3
    @EugeneBarsky No, she's curious. Besides, most of these questions will be useful to other people in the future. The ones about pre-compiling regexes and regex interpolation have been useful to me. – piojo Nov 22 '17 at 3:21
  • 2
    Thanks, piojo! 😃 @Holli one of my main tasks is searching, analyzing and transforming large textual corpora, written in different languages. Two years ago I discovered bash utilities (grep, sed and, later, awk) 😃, and two months ago I discovered p6, which helps me a lot. – Eugene Barsky Nov 22 '17 at 8:00
up vote 8 down vote accepted
my $input = "aaabbbb";
say .Str for $input ~~ m:ov/ (a)+  b ** {+$0} /;

Output:

aaabbb
aabb
ab

It's supposed to work with :ex instead of :ov, too - but Rakudo bug #130711 currently prevents that.

  • Great, thank you! I tried to do something like this, but it didn't work: "aaabbbb" ~~ m:ex/ (a) * (b) * <?{ +$0 == +$1 }> – Eugene Barsky Nov 21 '17 at 22:53
  • And the following doesn't work either. Is it because of the :ex bug? say .Str for $input ~~ m:ex/ (a)+ (b)+ <?{+$0 == +$1}> /; – Eugene Barsky Nov 22 '17 at 8:18
  • I can get it using :ov and the 'non-greedy' ? on the second part: say .Str for $input ~~ m:ov/ (a)+ (b)+? <?{+$0 == +$1}> /; – Eugene Barsky Nov 22 '17 at 8:21
  • I've added a working solution with :ex to the post (UPD2). – Eugene Barsky Nov 22 '17 at 10:35
  • try this one m:ex/ (a+) (b+) <?{ $0.chars == $1.chars }> / – wamba Nov 28 '17 at 18:56
my $input = "aaabbbb";
say .Str for $input ~~ m:ov/ a <~~>?  b  /;

Works with ex too

my $input = "aaabbbb";
say .Str for $input ~~ m:ex/ a <~~>?  b  /;

Upd: explanation

<~~> means call myself recursively see Extensible metasyntax. (It is not yet fully implemented.)

Following (longer, but maybe clearer) example works too:

  my $input = "aaabbbb";
  my token anbn { a <&anbn>? b} 
  say .Str for $input ~~ m:ex/ <&anbn> /;
  • Wow! @wamba Could you please explain, how it works? – Eugene Barsky Nov 28 '17 at 7:23

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.