23

Chrome and Safari are displaying a border around the image, but I don't want one. There is no border in Mozilla. I've looked through the CSS and HTML, and I can't find anything that is fixing it.

Here is the code:

<tr>
  <td class="near">
    <a href="../index.html"class="near_place">
      <img class="related_photo" />
      <h4 class="nearby"> adfadfad </h4>
      <span class="related_info">asdfadfadfaf</span>
    </a>
    ...

CSS:

a.near_place {
    border: none;
    background: #fff;
    display: block;
}

a.near_place:hover{
    background-color: #F5F5F5;
}

h4.nearby {
    height: auto;
    width: inherit;
    margin-top: -2px;
    margin-bottom: 3px;
    font-size: 12px;
    font-weight: normal;
    color: #000;
    display: inline;
}

img.related_photo {
    width: 80px;
    height: 60px;
    border: none;
    margin-right: 3px;
    float: left;
    overflow: hidden;
}

span.related_info {
    width: inherit;
    height: 48px;
    font-size: 11px;
    color: #666;
    display: block;
}


td.near {
    width: 25%;
    height: 70px;
    background: #FFF;

}

Sorry, I copied some old code before. Here is the code that is giving me trouble

Thanks in advance

5
  • In response to your code edit (which makes both answers provided so far irrelevant): is this border "dotted"?
    – thirtydot
    Jan 20, 2011 at 3:36
  • nope, just a solid thin border. It's not black though, its a lightish grey
    – golf_nut
    Jan 20, 2011 at 3:37
  • 1
    If your code is as you say it is (complete with border: none;), then I can't see what the problem could be. Are you sure you aren't using some old cached version?
    – thirtydot
    Jan 20, 2011 at 3:45
  • This shouldn't matter, but you're missing a space between the quote and the word class. In other words <a href="../index.html"class="near_place"> should be <a href="../index.html" class="near_place">
    – Jared
    Jan 20, 2011 at 3:58
  • 1
    Have you tried it with a src in the <img/> tag? I fired up a test.html in chrome and with an image it looks fine. Without the src though it shows a white box with a gray border. I believe your answer lies below (see sarcastyx). Jan 20, 2011 at 4:58

12 Answers 12

42

Now I don't know if this is a bug with Chrome or not but the grey border appears when it can't find the image, the image url is broken or as in your case the src isn't there. If you give the image a proper URL and the browser finds it then the border goes away. If the image is to not have a src then you will need to remove the height and width.

4
  • 1
    I'm with a similar problem, I'm using a sprite with background-position and background-image. If I remove the width and the height, the image just vanish. Jan 8, 2013 at 14:48
  • 1
    @MichelAyres for a sprite you will need to give it a height and width and will need to look at the code to figure out what is happening. I would recommend asking your own question and posting the defective code so that we can give you more help with this.
    – sarcastyx
    Jan 8, 2013 at 23:10
  • 1
    rparree's solution is very elegant if you really don't want it to have a src with your image. The other option is to use a div element instead of src and then set the CSS "display" to "inline-block"
    – Shaun314
    Jul 24, 2015 at 0:15
  • 1
    @MichelAyres Any fix incase of sprite ?
    – NeiL
    Sep 9, 2015 at 10:30
12

sarcastyx is right, but if you want a workarround you can set the width and height to 0 and a padding to make space for your image.

If you want a icon of 36x36, you can set width and height to 0 and pading:18px

1
  • Thanks; this helped me a ton, Gonzalo!
    – SoreThumb
    Dec 21, 2012 at 21:13
6

I know it is an old question. But another solution is to set the src to a 1x1 transparent pixel

<img class="related_photo"
     src="data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAIAAAAAAAP///yH5BAEAAAAALAAAAAABAAEAAAIBRAA7" />

This works for me.

0
5
.related_photo {
   content: '';
}
3
  • 1
    This removes the border in Chrome and Safari. A little explanation would be helpful, though.
    – showdev
    Oct 17, 2014 at 17:54
  • 3
    Though content: ' '; hides the borders when the image is not loaded but when the image is loaded, it hides the image too! So, this is not a solution. Jan 17, 2015 at 12:18
  • @Andrii Katsiubka this is quite awesome trick but I don't understand why content do that ... Anyway is better to apply this property only for nor src attribute image like <img/> using a css selector like img :not([src]){ content: ' ' } May 7, 2015 at 6:00
3

This may happen when the image is planted dynamically by css (e.g. by http://webcodertools.com/imagetobase64converter) in order to avoid extra HTTP requests. In this case we don't want to have a default image because of performance issues. I've solved it by switching from an img tag to a div tag.

0
2
img[src=""]{
    content: "";
}
1
1

Lazy image solution (img loading="lazy")

If you are using lazy image loading you may notice this thin thin border before the image has loaded more than if you didn't.

You're more likely to see this for a horizontal scrolling gallery than a normal vertical scrolling webpage.

Why?

Lazy loading unfortunately only works on the vertical axis. I'm assuming this is because there's a high likelihood that you're going to scroll down, but not left to right. The whole point of lazy loading is to reduce images 'below the fold' from consuming unnecessary bandwidth.

Soution 1:

Detect when the user has scrolled (eg. using intersection observer) and then set loading="eager" on each image you want to immediately load.

I haven't actually tested this, and it's possible some browser's won't immediately load images - but it should be fine.

Solution 2:

Detect when the image has finished loading loaded and then fade it in.

img.setAttribute('imageLoaded', 'false');
img.onload = () => 
{
   img.setAttribute('imageLoaded', 'true');
};

Then with css hide the image until it's loaded, after which it fades in nicely:

img
{
    opacity: 1;
    transition: opacity .5s;
}

img[imageLoaded='false'] 
{
    opacity: 0;  // hide image including gray outline
}

Also this behavior is subject to change, the browser may be clever enough to detect a horizontal scrolling element in future - but right now Chrome and Safari both seem to have a zero pixel window for looking for horizontal lazy images.

0
img.related_photo {
  width: 80px;
  height: 60px;
  **border: solid thin #DFDFDF;** //just remove this line
  margin-right: 3px;
  float: left;
  overflow: hidden;
}
1
  • Sorry, I copied some old code before. Here is the code that is giving me trouble
    – golf_nut
    Jan 20, 2011 at 3:31
0

Inside img.related_photo, you need to change border: solid thin #DFDFDF; to border: 0.

2
  • 1
    While border: 0 technically works, the correct way to do it is with border: none because border: 0 implies that there is still a border, but it's width just happens to be 0 so you don't see it.
    – Jared
    Jan 20, 2011 at 4:00
  • 2
    @Jared: Same difference?
    – thirtydot
    Jan 20, 2011 at 4:01
0

I have fixed this issue with:

<img src="img/1.jpg" style="height:150px; position: absolute; right: 15px;">

The right: 15px is where you want the image to be shown, but you can place it where you want.

0

I just added src="trans.png", trans.png is just a 100x100 transparent background png from photoshop. Worked like a charm no borders

-1

To summarise the answers given already: your options to remove the grey border from an img:not([src]), but still display an image using background-image in Chrome/Safari are:

  • Use a different tag that doesn't have this behaviour. (Thanks @Druvision)
    Eg: div or span.
    Sad face: it's not quite as semantic.

  • Use padding to define the dimensions. (Thanks @Gonzalo)
    Eg padding: 16px 10px 1px; replaces width:20px; height:17px;
    Sad face: dimensions and intentions aren't as obvious in the CSS, especially if it's not an even square like @Gonalo's example.

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