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I have a least squares minimization problem subject to inequality constraints which I am trying to solve using scipy.optimize.minimize. It seems that there are two options for inequality constraints: COBYLA and SLSQP.

I first tried SLSQP since it allow for explicit partial derivatives of the function to be minimized. Depending on the scaling of the problem, it fails with error:

Positive directional derivative for linesearch    (Exit mode 8)

whenever interval or more general inequality constraints are imposed.

This has been observed previously e.g., here. Manual scaling of the function to be minimized (along with the associated partial derivatives) seems to get rid of the problem, but I cannot achieve the same effect by changing ftol in the options.

Overall, this whole thing is causing me to have doubts about the routine working in a robust manner. Here's a simplified example:

import numpy as np
import scipy.optimize as sp_optimize

def cost(x, A, y):

    e = y - A.dot(x)
    rss = np.sum(e ** 2)

    return rss

def cost_deriv(x, A, y):

    e = y - A.dot(x)
    deriv0 = -2 * e.dot(A[:,0])
    deriv1 = -2 * e.dot(A[:,1])

    deriv = np.array([deriv0, deriv1])

    return deriv


A = np.ones((10,2)); A[:,0] = np.linspace(-5,5, 10)
x_true = np.array([2, 2/20])
y = A.dot(x_true)
x_guess = x_true / 2

prm_bounds = ((0, 3), (0,1))

cons_SLSQP = ({'type': 'ineq', 'fun' : lambda x: np.array([x[0] - x[1]]),
               'jac' : lambda x: np.array([1.0, -1.0])})

# works correctly
min_res_SLSQP = sp_optimize.minimize(cost, x_guess, args=(A, y), jac=cost_deriv, bounds=prm_bounds, method='SLSQP', constraints=cons_SLSQP, options={'disp': True})
print(min_res_SLSQP)

# fails
A = 100 * A
y = A.dot(x_true)
min_res_SLSQP = sp_optimize.minimize(cost, x_guess, args=(A, y), jac=cost_deriv, bounds=prm_bounds, method='SLSQP', constraints=cons_SLSQP, options={'disp': True})
print(min_res_SLSQP)

# works if bounds and inequality constraints removed
min_res_SLSQP = sp_optimize.minimize(cost, x_guess, args=(A, y), jac=cost_deriv,
method='SLSQP', options={'disp': True})
print(min_res_SLSQP)

How should ftol be set to avoid failure? More generally, can a similar problem arise with COBYLA? Is COBYLA a better choice for this type of inequality constrained least squares optimization problem?

Using a square root in the cost function was found to improve performance. However, for a non-linear re-paramterization of the problem (simpler but closer to what I need to do in practice), it fails again. Here are the details:

import numpy as np
import scipy.optimize as sp_optimize


def cost(x, y, g):

    e = ((y - x[1]) / x[0]) - g

    rss = np.sqrt(np.sum(e ** 2))

    return rss


def cost_deriv(x, y, g):

    e = ((y- x[1]) / x[0]) - g

    factor = 0.5 / np.sqrt(e.dot(e))
    deriv0 = -2 * factor * e.dot(y - x[1]) / (x[0]**2)
    deriv1 = -2 * factor * np.sum(e) / x[0]

    deriv = np.array([deriv0, deriv1])

    return deriv


x_true = np.array([1/300, .1])
N = 20
t = 20 * np.arange(N)
g = 100 * np.cos(2 * np.pi * 1e-3 * (t - t[-1] / 2))
y = g * x_true[0] + x_true[1]

x_guess = x_true / 2
prm_bounds = ((1e-4, 1e-2), (0, .4))

# check derivatives
delta = 1e-9
C0 = cost(x_guess, y, g)
C1 = cost(x_guess + np.array([delta, 0]), y, g)
approx_deriv0 = (C1 - C0) / delta
C1 = cost(x_guess + np.array([0, delta]), y, g)
approx_deriv1 = (C1 - C0) / delta
approx_deriv = np.array([approx_deriv0, approx_deriv1])
deriv = cost_deriv(x_guess, y, g)

# fails
min_res_SLSQP = sp_optimize.minimize(cost, x_guess, args=(y, g), jac=cost_deriv,
bounds=prm_bounds, method='SLSQP', options={'disp': True})
print(min_res_SLSQP)
2

Instead of minimizing np.sum(e ** 2), minimize sqrt(np.sum(e ** 2)), or better (in terms of calculation): np.linalg.norm(e)!

This modification:

  • does not change your solution in regards to x
  • will need post-processing if the original objective is needed (probably not)
  • is much more robust

With this change, all cases work, even using numerical-differentiation (i was too lazy to modify the gradient, which needs to reflect this!).

Example output (number of func-evals gives away num-diff):

Optimization terminated successfully.    (Exit mode 0)
            Current function value: 3.815547437029837e-06
            Iterations: 16
            Function evaluations: 88
            Gradient evaluations: 16
     fun: 3.815547437029837e-06
     jac: array([-6.09663382, -2.48862544])
 message: 'Optimization terminated successfully.'
    nfev: 88
     nit: 16
    njev: 16
  status: 0
 success: True
       x: array([ 2.00000037,  0.10000018])
Optimization terminated successfully.    (Exit mode 0)
            Current function value: 0.0002354577991007501
            Iterations: 23
            Function evaluations: 114
            Gradient evaluations: 23
     fun: 0.0002354577991007501
     jac: array([ 435.97259208,  288.7483819 ])
 message: 'Optimization terminated successfully.'
    nfev: 114
     nit: 23
    njev: 23
  status: 0
 success: True
       x: array([ 1.99999977,  0.10000014])
Optimization terminated successfully.    (Exit mode 0)
            Current function value: 0.0003392807206384532
            Iterations: 21
            Function evaluations: 112
            Gradient evaluations: 21
     fun: 0.0003392807206384532
     jac: array([ 996.57340243,   51.19298764])
 message: 'Optimization terminated successfully.'
    nfev: 112
     nit: 21
    njev: 21
  status: 0
 success: True
       x: array([ 2.00000008,  0.10000104])

While there are probably some problems with SLSQP, it's still one of the most tested and robust codes given that broad application-spectrum!

I would also expect SLSQP to be much better here compared to COBYLA, as the latter is based heavily on linearizations. (but just take it as a guess; it's easy to try given the minimize-interface!)

Alternative

In general, an Interior-point based solver for Convex Quadratic Programming will be the best approach here. But for this, you need to leave scipy. (or maybe an SOCP-solver would be better... i'm not sure).

cvxpy brings a nice-modelling system and a good open-source solver (ECOS; although technically a conic-solver -> more general and less robust; but should beat SLSQP).

Using cvxpy and ECOS, this looks like:

import numpy as np
import cvxpy as cvx

""" Problem data """
A = np.ones((10,2)); A[:,0] = np.linspace(-5,5, 10)
x_true = np.array([2, 2/20])
y = A.dot(x_true)
x_guess = x_true / 2

prm_bounds = ((0, 3), (0,1))

# problematic case
A = 100 * A
y = A.dot(x_true)

""" Solve """
x = cvx.Variable(len(x_true))
constraints = [x[0] >= x[1]]
for ind, (lb, ub) in enumerate(prm_bounds):  # ineffecient -> matrix-based expr better!
    constraints.append(x[ind] >= lb)
    constraints.append(x[ind] <= ub)

objective = cvx.Minimize(cvx.norm(A*x - y))
problem = cvx.Problem(objective, constraints)
problem.solve(solver=cvx.ECOS, verbose=False)
print(problem.status)
print(problem.value)
print(x.value.T)

# optimal
# -6.67593652593801e-10
# [[ 2.   0.1]]
  • OK, this works. Could you briefly explain why including the square root makes the solution more robust? I will now try this on the actual (rather than the above simplified) problem. Also, if I have direct interval constraints on the parameters, those can be communicated to the optimizer via the bounds argument or by explicitly writing inequality constraints for the upper and lower bounds. Is there any expected difference in performance between these two approaches? – rhz Nov 22 '17 at 21:20
  • (1) Because every non-trivial optimization algorithm is combating numerical-trouble introduced by finite-precision floating-points. So there are (at least implicit) assumptions about number-sizes/magnitudes. A square blows up very fast! (2) In general: use bounds! 100%! It depends on the solver if those are explicitly handled or if transformed into inequalities or other substitutions are used. (i don't know what SLSQP is doing internally; it can probably be found out quite easily; but using the bounds argument is never worse) – sascha Nov 22 '17 at 21:22
  • Makes sense. BTW, my real problem is a nonlinear least squares minimization subject to interval and inequality constraints. I assume that both the square root version of SLSQP as well as cvxpy should handle this, right? (Verifying this for SLSQP now). – rhz Nov 22 '17 at 21:56
  • Depends if the problem is convex or not. Probably it is not. This means: convex/conic-approaches won't work (no cvxpy!). It also means: SLSQP will do, but your solution only guarantees a local-optimum. – sascha Nov 22 '17 at 22:00
  • I tried a different parameterization of the problem (closer to what I'd encounter in practice) and wound up with the same error (even though the square root was used in the cost function). Any clues as to what may be going on here? – rhz Nov 22 '17 at 23:04

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