10

I have below POC to use Java 8 feature.

I want to update DB after accept method. Is it good to go with andThen()? When is this method called? Who calls it?

What is the basic use of andThen() method? Looking at the docs was confusing.

public class StockTest {

    public static void main(String[] args) {

    List<Trader> traders = new ArrayList<>();

    Random random = new Random();

    // Initializing trading a/c's.
    for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
        Trader trader = new Trader((random.nextInt(100) + 1) * 3);
        traders.add(trader);
    }
    // Display Trade accounts.
    System.out.println("Before Bonus, Units are:");
    for (Trader trader : traders) {
        System.out.print(trader.getUnits() + "\t");
    }

    // Add bonus to each trader.
    traders.forEach(new Consumer<Trader>() {

        @Override
        public void accept(Trader trader) {
            trader.updateBonus(2);
        }

        @Override
        public Consumer<Trader> andThen(Consumer<? super Trader> after) 
       {
            System.out.println("In andThen");
            return Consumer.super.andThen(after);
        }
        });

    // Display Trade accounts after bonus applied..
    System.out.println("\nAfter bonus:");
    for (Trader trader : traders) {
        System.out.print(trader.getUnits() + "\t");
     }

   }

 }

 class Trader {
    private int units;

    public Trader(int initialUnits) {
    this.units = initialUnits;
 }

   public int getUnits() {
        return units;
    }

public void setUnits(int units) {
    this.units = units;
}

 public void updateBonus(int bonusUnits) {
    this.units = this.units * bonusUnits;
  }
 }

Please help with some example or use cases to utilize this method

3

In short andThen is used to chain consumers, so the input will go to first and second consumer, lke below:

        Consumer<Trader> consumer1 = new Consumer<Trader>() {

            @Override
            public void accept(Trader trader) {
                trader.updateBonus(2);
            }};

        Consumer<Trader> consumer2 = new Consumer<Trader>() {

            @Override
            public void accept(Trader trader) {
                // do something
            }};
        // Add bonus to each trader.
        traders.forEach(consumer1.andThen(consumer2));

So here the Trader will be passed to consumer1, then to consumer2 and so on.

You don't have to implement this method, or override it. When it comes to Consumers, implement only the accept.

andThen method is a helper tool to join consumers. Instead of passing the input to all of them in a loop.

6

You use andThen when you want to chain the logic of two Consumers. consumer1.andThen(consumer2) first calls the accept method of consumer1 and then calls the accept method of consumer2.

Overriding the default implementation of andThen makes little sense and prevents you from using lambda expressions/method references.

andThen can be used to chain two Consumers:

traders.forEach(((Consumer<Trader>)(trader -> trader.updateBonus(2))).andThen(trader -> System.out.println("some more processing")));

Of course, in this example you can simply put the logic of the two Consumers in a single Consumer:

traders.forEach(trader -> {trader.updateBonus(2);
                           System.out.println("some more processing");});

It makes more sense to use andThen when you are chaining two existing Consumers:

Consumer<Trader> traderConsumer1 = trader -> trader.updateBonus(2);
Consumer<Trader> traderConsumer2 = trader -> System.out.println(trader);
traders.forEach(traderConsumer1.andThen(traderConsumer2));
  • 2
    You can’t just write (trader -> trader.updateBonus(2)).andThen(trader -> System.out.println("some more processing")), as Java isn’t capable of inferring the type of the first lambda expression, hence, doesn’t know where to search for the andThen method, thus not being capable of determining the target type of the second lambda expression as well… – Holger Nov 23 '17 at 8:21
  • 1
    @Holger Yeah, I wasn't sure of that, and did test it. I guess you have to cast the first lambda expression to Consumer<Trader>. Thanks – Eran Nov 23 '17 at 8:22
  • 2
    One more reason to only use andThen when you have an existing consumer. – Holger Nov 23 '17 at 8:28
  • @Eran, Nice one. +1. – CHowdappaM Nov 23 '17 at 8:35

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