I'm coming to Elixir from primarily a Javascript background. in JS, it's possible to write a higher order function "once" which returns a function that will invoke the passed in function only once, and returns the previous result on subsequent calls- the trick is manipulating variables that were captured via closure:

var once = (func) => {
    var wasCalled = false, prevResult;
    return (...args) => {
        if (wasCalled) return prevResult;
        wasCalled = true;
        return prevResult = func(...args);
    }
}

It seems to me that it's not possible to create this function in Elixir, due to its different variable rebinding behavior. Is there some other clever way to do it via pattern matching or recursion, or is it just not possible? Without macros that is, I'd imagine those might enable it. Thanks

  • By the way, for your future reference what you're asking for is called "memoization". Just in case you have more questions about it it's good to know the correct terminology for future google searches. – Onorio Catenacci Nov 28 '17 at 13:07
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Using the current process dictionary:

defmodule A do
  def once(f) do
    key = make_ref()
    fn ->
      case Process.get(key) do
        {^key, val} -> val
        nil -> 
          val = f.()
          Process.put(key, {key, val})
          val
      end
    end
  end
end

Or if the function will be passed across processes, an ets table can be used:

# ... during application initialization
:ets.new(:cache, [:set, :public, :named_table])


defmodule A do
  def once(f) do
    key = make_ref()
    fn ->
      case :ets.lookup(:cache, key) do
        [{^key, val}] -> val
        [] -> 
          val = f.()
          :ets.insert(:cache, {key, val})
          val
      end
    end
  end
end

Application.put_env / Application.get_env can also be used to hold global state, though usually is used for configuration settings.

  • Interesting, I was not familiar with this. Would this be considered idiomatic? or is there a completely different approach to the problem this function is meant to solve (caching result of an expensive function) that would be more typical/suitable for Elixir? Thanks. – lt1 Nov 23 '17 at 11:39
  • 1
    Idiomatic? No. I think the idiomatic approach is to define a GenServer that exposes a client API for computing the function, and maintains any cached results in the internal state of the GenServer. – Mike Buhot Nov 23 '17 at 11:43
  • 2
    @MikeBuhot exactly. I did not see this comment before because I was busy writing my answer :) – Aleksei Matiushkin Nov 23 '17 at 12:03

It's not considered idiomatic in most cases, but you can do this with Agent:

defmodule A do
  def once(fun) do
    {:ok, agent} = Agent.start_link(fn -> nil end)
    fn args ->
      case Agent.get(agent, & &1) do
        nil ->
          result = apply(fun, args)
          :ok = Agent.update(agent, fn _ -> {:ok, result} end)
          result
        {:ok, result} ->
          result
      end
    end
  end
end

Now if you run this:

once = A.once(fn sleep ->
  :timer.sleep(sleep)
  1 + 1
end)

IO.inspect once.([1000])
IO.inspect once.([1000])
IO.inspect once.([1000])
IO.inspect once.([1000])

You'll see that the first line is printed after 1 second, but the next 3 are printed instantly, because the result is fetched from the agent.

  • I wonder why this would not be considered idiomatic. An Agent is just a GenServer instance that has been specialized to do exactly the thing you're using it for (hold a value), so I actually think this is a nicer solution than the one by mudasobwa. It is also the most precise translation of the JS code that doesn't rely on "dirty" stuff like the process dictionary. To me, the only drawback is that the start_link is called by whatever random process first invokes it, so probably the ETS version is cleanest. – cdegroot Jul 30 at 9:03

While both already given answers are perfectly valid, the most precise translation from your javascript is shown below:

defmodule M do
  use GenServer

  def start_link(_opts \\ []) do
    GenServer.start_link(__MODULE__, nil, name: __MODULE__)
  end

  def init(_args) do
    Process.sleep(1_000)
    {:ok, 42}
  end

  def value() do
    start_link()
    GenServer.call(__MODULE__, :value)
  end

  def handle_call(:value, _from, state) do
    {:reply, state, state}
  end
end

(1..5) |> Enum.each(&IO.inspect(M.value(), label: to_string(&1)))

Use the same metric as in @Dogbert’s answer: the first value is printed with a delay, all subsequent are printed immediately.

This is an exact analog of your memoized function using GenServer stage. GenServer.start_link/3 returns one of the following:

{:ok, #PID<0.80.0>}
{:error, {:already_started, #PID<0.80.0>}}

That said, it is not restarted if it’s already started. I do not bother to check the returned value since we are all set in any case: if it’s the initial start, we call the heavy function, if we were already started, the vaklue is already at fingers in the state.

  • See below - I think the Agent version is more idiomatic. It's basically the same code, but nicer. – cdegroot Jul 30 at 9:04
  • @cdegroot Agent is absolutely redundant entity possibly created in early times of Elixir to attract newbies who had a fear of “immutability everywhere” paradigm. There is no one single situation when using of Agent is justified and when Agent is anyhow better than plain old good GenServer. I do use the same tools as Occam does while shaving. – Aleksei Matiushkin Jul 30 at 9:08
  • Agent is a GenServer. Just a specialized one. It's appropriate to use the more specialized library code - it's shorter. Saying it it's redundant is saying that Elixir is redundant because you can write BEAM bytecode directly. – cdegroot Jul 30 at 9:12
  • @cdegroot sure it’s appropriate it just makes no sense. Check how many times Agent is used in Ecto (spoiler: 1 time, 4 years ago, for migrations,) and in Phoenix (spoiler: 0 times.) Guess why. – Aleksei Matiushkin Jul 30 at 9:32
  • I guess neither library needs memoization, then ;-). – cdegroot Jul 31 at 22:16

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