65

I'm trying to upload my repo on github and go through all the steps upto:

git push -u origin master

at that point it gives me the following error:

remote: Permission to samrao2/manager-4.git denied to samrao1.

fatal: unable to access 'https://github.com/samrao2/manager-4.git/': The requested URL returned error: 403

I think the issue is that i was logged into another Git account before "samrao1" and now i am trying to push to "samrao2".

Can someone help me reset this to where i can successfully push to "samrao2". I am assuming i will be prompted for my password the first time i try to do it.

3
124

Unable to access https means: this has nothing to do with SSH (and switching to SSH, while possible, does not explain the original issue)

This has to do with credential caching, meaning Git will be default provide the credentials (GitHub account and password) of the old account while you are trying to push to the new account.

See if you have a credential helper that would have cached your (old account) credentials (username/password) used to authentication you.

git config credential.helper 

On Mac, as commented by Arpit J, just goto/open your keychain access->search for github.com related file->and edit credentials there.

https://help.github.com/assets/images/help/setup/keychain-access.png

See "Updating credentials from the OSX Keychain"

On Windows (And, in 2021, possibly Linux or even Mac), that would be the Windows Credential Managers GCMC: Git Credential Manager Core.
Open the Windows Credential Store, and see if the first user is registered there: delete that entry, and you will be able to authenticate with the second user.

(Here is an example for BitBucket)

https://kwilson.io/blog/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/4-store.png


In command-line (see git credential), for a manager core credential helper:

  • Get the old password:

    printf "protocol=https\nhost=github.com\nusername=<me>" | \
      git credential-manager-core get
    
    # output:
    protocol=https
    host=github.com
    username=<me>
    password=<oldpassword>
    
  • Remove the old password:

    printf "protocol=https\nhost=github.com\nusername=<me>" | \
      git credential-manager-core erase
    

(Replace <me> by your GitHub user account name)

7
  • 1
    this worked. Thanks. I went into the Mac Keychain and deleted a acouple of records pertaining to Github. It then prompted me for the password and it worked just great! Thanks!! – Sam Rao Nov 24 '17 at 20:34
  • 2
    Thnx!! For ppl on MacOS, just goto/open your keychain access->search for github.com related file->and edit credentials there. Sometimes it takes the default logged in account and stores it there. – Arpit J. Nov 9 '18 at 5:36
  • 2
    @ArpitJ. Thank you. I have included your comment in the answer for more visibility. – VonC Nov 9 '18 at 7:19
  • 1
    Thank you. This almost drives me crazy. I must remember it. – Jeff T. Sep 30 '19 at 10:11
  • 1
    @JeffT. You are welcome. I have edited the answer to include the command-line alternative. – VonC Sep 30 '19 at 14:51
8

If you are using MacOS, you can

  1. go to KeyChain Access,
  2. Search for "GitHub",
  3. then when then result "github.com" pops up, change the account or password to your new account, and save.

Then you are all set!

6

I'm not sure what the issue is, but since you mentioned not knowing what having the "right keys installed" means, I'm going to assume you have not set up your computer to authenticate to your Github repository via SSH.

This guide should show you how to do that: Adding a new SSH key to your Github account

Also, I would suggesting using 'git://github.com/samrao2/manager-4.git/' for your remote URL rather than 'https://github.com/samrao2/manager-4.git/'. The latter requires you to enter a password each time, whereas the former will authenticate via SSH, which is far less irritating. You can change the remote URL in your repository to use the git protocol, instead of https, by typing:

git remote set-url origin git://github.com/samrao2/manager-4.git

from within your project directory.

1
  • You can even add GitHub to your SSH config! – iBug Nov 24 '17 at 3:40
3
  1. Multiple users generate their own ssh key, Generating a new SSH key and adding it to the ssh-agent

  2. Adding a new SSH key to your GitHub account

  3. Alice Repository, git bash:

    • git config user.name "Alice"
    • git config user.email "alice@email.com"
    • eval $(ssh-agent -s),
    • ssh-add ~/.ssh/alice.private
    • ssh -T git@github.com, Testing your SSH connection
    • Git other operations
  4. Bob Repository, git bash:

    • git config user.name "Bob"
    • git config user.email "bob@email.com"
    • eval $(ssh-agent -s),
    • ssh-add ~/.ssh/bob.private
    • ssh -T git@github.com, Testing your SSH connection
    • Git other operations
1

The problem is you are trying to push into new github account using old github account's ssh key, so generate a new SSH key for the new github account using this link https://help.github.com/en/github/authenticating-to-github/error-permission-to-userrepo-denied-to-userother-repo and then add it your github account. After this try to push, it works

0

I have one personal account and one business account at Github. I commit and push changes to both accounts at the same time.

What I did was 1) to run personal and business projects at separate sessions; 2) to set the URL for one account with an SSH link, and leave the URL as normal (HTTPS) for another account.

-1

Removing the .git folder from the project directory, and then again pushing them from the beginning worked for me.

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