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While I was trying to learn about C++ operators, I stumbled upon a strange comparison operator on cppreference.com,* in a table that looked like this:

enter image description here

"Well, if these are common operators in C++, I better learn them", I thought. But all my attempts to elucidate this mystery were unsuccessful. Even here, on Stack Overflow I had no luck in my search.

Is there a connection between <=> and C++?

And if there is, what does this operator do exactly?

* In the meantime cppreference.com updated that page and now contains information about the<=>operator.

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    @haccks: Oh please, we've had plenty of questions about stuff that didn't even get voted into the standard. We have a C++20 tag for a reason. This kind of stuff very much is on-topic. – Nicol Bolas Nov 24 '17 at 8:21
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    @cubuspl42 bar< foo::operator<=> is an example of how it could be like the <-- operator. – Yakk - Adam Nevraumont Nov 24 '17 at 20:56
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    @haccks: Right. Like C++11 is a tag about compilers that implement C++11. And C++14 is a tag about compilers that implement C++14. And C++17 is about compilers that implement C++17. No, the C++20 is the tag for stuff about C++20. And since this question is about C++20, there it is. The tag wiki that was wrong, not the tag itself. – Nicol Bolas Nov 25 '17 at 1:03
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This is called the three-way comparison operator.

According to the P0515 paper proposal:

There’s a new three-way comparison operator, <=>. The expression a <=> b returns an object that compares <0 if a < b, compares >0 if a > b, and compares ==0 if a and b are equal/equivalent.

To write all comparisons for your type, just write operator<=> that returns the appropriate category type:

  • Return an _ordering if your type naturally supports <, and we’ll efficiently generate <, >, <=, >=, ==, and !=; otherwise return an _equality, and we’ll efficiently generate == and !=.

  • Return strong if for your type a == b implies f(a) == f(b) (substitutability, where f reads only comparison-salient state accessible using the nonprivate const interface), otherwise return weak.

The cppreference says:

The three-way comparison operator expressions have the form

lhs <=> rhs   (1)  

The expression returns an object that

  • compares <0 if lhs < rhs
  • compares >0 if lhs > rhs
  • and compares ==0 if lhs and rhs are equal/equivalent.
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    For those who are confused (like I was) about what "compares <0", "compares >0", and "compares ==0" means, they mean the <=> returns a negative, positive, or zero value, depending on the arguments. Much like strncmp and memcmp. – Cornstalks Nov 24 '17 at 15:29
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    @Dai even though both 'a' < 'a' and 'c' < 'a' are both false, 'a' < 'a' and 'a' < 'c' are not. IN strong ordering following is true: a != ba < b || b < a – Revolver_Ocelot Nov 26 '17 at 7:12
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    @Revolver_Ocelot Ah, so it can be defined/generated as operator==(T x, T y) { return !(x < y) && !(y < x); } and operator!=(T x, T y) { return (x < y) || (y < x); } - ah-ha! Of course this is less efficient than a true == as it invokes the comparison twice, but still neat. – Dai Nov 26 '17 at 7:24
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    What do "return strong" and "return weak" mean? – lucidbrot Nov 26 '17 at 12:24
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    @hkBattousai it means that the object returns, when compared < 0 evaluates to true. That is, if a < b then (a <=> b) < 0 is always true. – rmobis Nov 28 '17 at 18:53
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On 2017-11-11, the ISO C++ committee adopted Herb Sutter's proposal for the <=> "spaceship" three-way comparison operator as one of the new features that were added to C++20. In the paper titled Consistent comparison Sutter, Maurer and Brown demonstrate the concepts of the new design. For an overview of the proposal, here's an excerpt from the article:

The expression a <=> b returns an object that compares <0 if a < b, compares >0 if a > b, and compares ==0 if a and b are equal/equivalent.

Common case: To write all comparisons for your type X with type Y, with memberwise semantics, just write:

auto X::operator<=>(const Y&) =default;

Advanced cases: To write all comparisons for your type X with type Y, just write operator<=> that takes a Y, can use =default to get memberwise semantics if desired, and returns the appropriate category type:

  • Return an _ordering if your type naturally supports <, and we’ll efficiently generate symmetric <, >, <=, >=, ==, and !=; otherwise return an _equality, and we’ll efficiently generate symmetric == and !=.
  • Return strong_ if for your type a == b implies f(a) == f(b) (substitutability, where f reads only comparison-salient state that is accessible using the public const members), otherwise return weak_.

Comparison Categories

Five comparison categories are defined as std:: types, each having the following predefined values:

+--------------------------------------------------------------------+
|                  |          Numeric  values          | Non-numeric |
|     Category     +-----------------------------------+             |
|                  | -1   | 0          | +1            |   values    |
+------------------+------+------------+---------------+-------------+
| strong_ordering  | less | equal      | greater       |             |
| weak_ordering    | less | equivalent | greater       |             |
| partial_ordering | less | equivalent | greater       | unordered   |
| strong_equality  |      | equal      | nonequal      |             |
| weak_equality    |      | equivalent | nonequivalent |             |
+------------------+------+------------+---------------+-------------+

Implicit conversions between these types are defined as follows:

  • strong_ordering with values {less, equal, greater} implicitly converts to:
    • weak_ordering with values {less, equivalent, greater}
    • partial_ordering with values {less, equivalent, greater}
    • strong_equality with values {unequal, equal, unequal}
    • weak_equality with values {nonequivalent, equivalent, nonequivalent}
  • weak_ordering with values {less, equivalent, greater} implicitly converts to:
    • partial_ordering with values {less, equivalent, greater}
    • weak_equality with values {nonequivalent, equivalent, nonequivalent}
  • partial_ordering with values {less, equivalent, greater, unordered} implicitly converts to:
    • weak_equality with values {nonequivalent, equivalent, nonequivalent, nonequivalent}
  • strong_equality with values {equal, unequal} implicitly converts to:
    • weak_equality with values {equivalent, nonequivalent}

Three-way comparison

The<=>token is introduced. The character sequence<=>tokenizes to<= >, in old source code. For example,X<&Y::operator<=>needs to add a space to retain its meaning.

The overloadable operator<=>is a three-way comparison function and has precedence higher than< and lower than<<. It returns a type that can be compared against literal0but other return types are allowed such as to support expression templates. All<=>operators defined in the language and in the standard library return one of the 5 aforementionedstd::comparison category types.

For language types, the following built-in<=>same-type comparisons are provided. All are constexpr, except where noted otherwise. These comparisons cannot be invoked heterogeneously using scalar promotions/conversions.

  • Forbool, integral, and pointer types,<=>returnsstrong_ordering.
  • For pointer types, the different cv-qualifications and derived-to-base conversions are allowed to invoke a homogeneous built-in<=>, and there are built-in heterogeneousoperator<=>(T*, nullptr_t). Only comparisons of pointers to the same object/allocation are constant expressions.
  • For fundamental floating point types,<=> returnspartial_ordering, and can be invoked heterogeneously by widening arguments to a larger floating point type.
  • For enumerations,<=> returns the same as the enumeration's underlying type's<=>.
  • Fornullptr_t,<=> returnsstrong_orderingand always yieldsequal.
  • For copyable arrays,T[N] <=> T[N]returns the same type asT's<=>and performs lexicographical elementwise comparison. There is no<=>for other arrays.
  • Forvoidthere is no<=>.

To better understand the inner workings of this operator, please read the original paper. This is just what I've found out using search engines.

  • As if cpp wasn't complex enough already. Why not simply write a comparison method... – Leandro Feb 24 at 10:13
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    @Leandro The spaceship operator is that comparison method. Additionally, it Just Works and writes (or deletes) the six other comparison operators. I’ll take one comparison operator function written over six individual boilerplates. – Jon Harper Mar 23 at 17:13
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This answer has become irrelevant since the referenced web page has changed

The web page you are referencing was broken. It was being edited a lot that day and different parts was not in sync. The status when I was looking at it was:

At the top of the page it lists the currently existing comparison operators (in C++14). There is no <=>there.

At the bottom of the page, they should have listed the same operators, but they goofed and added this future suggestion.

gcc doesn't know about <=>yet (and with -std=c++14, never will), so it thinks you meant a <= > b. This is explains the error message.

If you try the same thing five years from now you will probably get a better error message, something like <=> not part of C++14.

  • 1
    The web page OP links to is correct, as is the separate page you link to. It qualifies the <=> operator with the (since C++20) label, telling you which version of the standard to expect it in. Standards labeling is a convention that cppreference.com follows. Of course you don't have a compiler that came back in a time machine to support it for you, but cpprefernce tells you (correctly) what to expect. – Spencer Nov 24 '17 at 22:13
  • Yes, but... Not an answer. You are commenting... or something. – q-l-p Nov 24 '17 at 22:34
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    I intended to link to the same web page as the question, but missed. I think I answered the parts of the question other answers didn't. I ignored the main bolded question since other had already answered that. – Stig Hemmer Nov 27 '17 at 8:25

protected by cs95 Nov 26 '17 at 6:57

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