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I'm working on some geometry-based code. The task at hand involves use of a bounding-box to contain the solid specimen. Now, in the code I have devised two different types of such boxes, namely INNER_BOUNDING_BOX and OUTER_BOUNDING_BOX. The code further expects use of any one of the two boxes, but not both. I'm trying to achieve it through the use of preprocessor. I have written further code based on a couple of macros namely USE_INNER_BOUNDING_BOX and USE_OUTER_BOUNDING_BOX. I can ensure that at any time any one macro is defined through some simple construct like this:

#if defined(USE_INNER_BOUNDING_BOX) && defined(USE_OUTER_BOUNDING_BOX)
    #undef USE_INNER_BOUNDING_BOX
    #undef USE_OUTER_BOUNDING_BOX
    #define USE_INNER_BOUNDING_BOX
#endif

#ifndef USE_INNER_BOUNDING_BOX
    #ifndef USE_OUTER_BOUNDING_BOX
        #define USE_INNER_BOUNDING_BOX
    #endif
#endif

Now, if I wanted to use any particular box, I could just define the corresponding macro. The difficulty comes with wanting for use of a default setting macro say USE_DEFAULT_BOUNDING_BOX, which I could use to then set up define for any one of USE_INNER_BOUNDING_BOX or USE_OUTER_BOUNDING_BOX when both or none of them are explicitly defined. I'd be inclined towards portable code, but compiler-specific trick could also pass. I'm using Visual Studio 2012.

  • 1
    Not really an answer to the question you ask, but why don't you define a single switch BOUNDING_BOX_TO_USE to be INNER == 1 OUTER == 2 ? That way it could inherently not be both. – Yunnosch Nov 24 '17 at 9:05
  • I could write something on similar lines. It did not strike to me at that time. :) I shall try to implement it differently maybe. However, it's still an accidental question and it was fun, so I asked. :) – user2338150 Nov 24 '17 at 9:08
  • These macro blocks already do exactly what you want: define one of those macros when either both of then or none of them are defined. It could be shorter though. – VTT Nov 24 '17 at 9:24
1

Reliable one-of-many selections like those can better be done by selecting them with a single multi-value switch right away.

#define BOUNDING_INNER 1
#define BOUNDING_OUTER 2

/* default */
#define BOUNDING_BOX_TO_USE BOUNDING_INNER

/* alternatively please activate below line 
#define BOUNDING_BOX_TO_USE BOUNDING_OUTER
*/

If you need to stay backward compatible to some configurations,
e.g. your code has already been used by others,
you can derive the single switch from the two, matching your default behaviour. The advantage is to avoid #undef (in case you agree that it is an advantage to do so).

#if defined(USE_INNER_BOUNDING_BOX) && defined(USE_OUTER_BOUNDING_BOX)
#define BOUNDING_BOX_TO_USE BOUNDING_INNER
#endif

#ifndef USE_INNER_BOUNDING_BOX
    #ifndef USE_OUTER_BOUNDING_BOX
        #define BOUNDING_BOX_TO_USE BOUNDING_INNER
    #endif
#endif

/* In case you are as paranoid a programmer as I am,
   you might want to do some plausibility checking
   here. ifndef, >0, <2 etc., triggering some #errors. */


/* Later, in code doing the actual implementation: */

#if (BOUNDING_BOX_TO_USE == BOUNDING_INNER)
/* do inner bounding stuff */
#endif
/* other code, e.g. common for inner and outer */
#if (BOUNDING_BOX_TO_USE == BOUNDING_OUTER)
/* do outer bounding stuff */
#endif
  • I'll take it as answer. I shall define USE_OUTER_BOUNDING_BOX or USE_INNER_BOUNDING_BOX instead in the equals blocks, and replace the same in previous blocks with something else. Yes, I'd like to keep defines the way they were, and avoid undefs. Isn't that a good practice in the general sense, lest you're in the midst of conflicting defines from unconnected, unaware pieces of code? – user2338150 Nov 24 '17 at 9:25
  • I think I do not really get what practice you are asking about? Using undef? Not good in my opinion. Staying backward compatible to already distributed configuration concepts? Good in my opinion. Cleaning up conflicting defines? Good. Getting rid of undefs to do so? Good. – Yunnosch Nov 24 '17 at 9:36
  • 1
    Yeah, and you missed defines from IDE, or project-files, Makefiles. Sorry, I had to leave in midst of conversation. Anyways, I think I could share some of the code compilation griefs you seem to have been through. Makes you want to be paranoid, I wish I could think any different. – user2338150 Nov 24 '17 at 9:53
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Since there are only two values I would use only one boolean variable:

#ifndef USE_OUTER_BOUNDING_BOX
    #define USE_OUTER_BOUNDING_BOX 0
#endif

If USE_OUTER_BOUNDING_BOX is zero (false) the inner bounding box is used.

test.c:

#include <stdio.h>

#ifndef USE_OUTER_BOUNDING_BOX
    #define USE_OUTER_BOUNDING_BOX 0
#endif

int main(void)
{
    printf("%d\n", USE_OUTER_BOUNDING_BOX);
    return 0;
}

Example:

$ cc -o test -DUSE_OUTER_BOUNDING_BOX=0 test.c
$ ./test 
0
$ cc -o test -DUSE_OUTER_BOUNDING_BOX=1 test.c
$ ./test
1
  • It would certainly work in this case here, however what the question was after was trying to get some overkill preprocessor trick, which would work if more than two boxes were involved. I should have phrased the question like that. Anyways, your code too would work in my case, but it needs dependency on value of the macro, which I don't want to explicitly specify. I ended up with this quick fix here. Of course it would need to be modified for more box types (the conditional blocks): – user2338150 Nov 24 '17 at 10:18
0

Here is what I ended with:

// Comment to use bigger outer Bounding-Box
#define USE_INNER_BOUNDING_BOX

#define INNER_BOUNDING_BOX 0
#define OUTER_BOUNDING_BOX 1

#define DEFAULT_BOUNDING_BOX OUTER_BOUNDING_BOX

#if defined(USE_INNER_BOUNDING_BOX) && !defined(USE_OUTER_BOUNDING_BOX)
    #define USE_BOUNDING_BOX INNER_BOUNDING_BOX
#elif defined(USE_OUTER_BOUNDING_BOX)
    #define USE_BOUNDING_BOX OUTER_BOUNDING_BOX
#else
    #define USE_BOUNDING_BOX DEFAULT_BOUNDING_BOX
#endif

#if (USE_BOUNDING_BOX == INNER_BOUNDING_BOX)
    #undef USE_OUTER_BOUNDING_BOX
    #define USE_INNER_BOUNDING_BOX
#else
    #undef USE_INNER_BOUNDING_BOX
    #define USE_OUTER_BOUNDING_BOX
#endif

This just works in this case. In case of more boxes, I'd append the conditional blocks.

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