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If have list of af string, how can filter so equal neighbors only appears one?

Example:

['0.1', '0.1', '0.2','0.3','0.3','0.1','0.2'] 

should result in

['0.1', '0.2','0.3','0.1','0.2'] 

notice that element 0, 1 only appears once and element 4 and 5 also appears only once.

If use unique:

['0.1', '0.1', '0.2','0.3','0.3','0.1','0.2'].unique()

the result will be:

['0.1', '0.2','0.3'] //what is not wanted

Any suggestions for the best groovy method?

  • Do you want just unique or repeat duplicate series again? your expected result seems partial. – Nitin Dhomse Nov 24 '17 at 12:23
  • No sure if understand your question: But I want a result where neighbors equal each other in a sorted list. Unique remove all duplicates. – Dasma Nov 24 '17 at 12:26
1

So if you want remove duplicated neighbors, you should get next item from current loop. i come up something like this:

def example =  ['0.1', '0.1', '0.2','0.3','0.3','0.1','0.2']
def array = []
example.eachWithIndex { item, index ->
    def next = index  < example.size() - 1 ? example[ index  + 1 ] : null
    if(next != item) {
        array.push(item)
    }
}

println array ​
2

One simple option is to iterate with a trailing value:

def example =  ['0.1', '0.1', '0.2','0.3','0.3','0.1','0.2']
def array = []
def trailing = -999

example.each { item ->
    if (item != trailing) { array << item }
    trailing = item 
}

assert ['0.1','0.2','0.3','0.1','0.2'] == array
1

Another, more functional way, is as follows, using inject (known in other languages as reduce):

def example = ['0.1','0.1','0.2','0.3','0.3','0.1','0.2']

def array = example.inject([example[0]]) { acc, val ->
    if (val != acc[-1]) { acc << val }
    acc
}

assert ['0.1','0.2','0.3','0.1','0.2'] == array

The key is to start with array containing the first element, [example[0]], and then iterate over example. inject provides both the running accumulation and the value. If we add a log line:

def array = example.inject([example[0]]) { acc, val ->
    println "acc: ${acc} val: ${val}"
    if (val != acc[-1]) { acc << val }
    acc
}

then output is:

acc: [0.1] val: 0.1
acc: [0.1] val: 0.1
acc: [0.1] val: 0.2
acc: [0.1, 0.2] val: 0.3
acc: [0.1, 0.2, 0.3] val: 0.3
acc: [0.1, 0.2, 0.3] val: 0.1
acc: [0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.1] val: 0.2

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