5

How would one implement a not_all_equal/1 predicate, which succeeds if the given list contains at least 2 different elements and fails otherwise?

Here is my attempt (a not very pure one):

not_all_equal(L) :-
    (   member(H1, L), member(H2, L), H1 \= H2 -> true
    ;   list_to_set(L, S),
        not_all_equal_(S)
    ).

not_all_equal_([H|T]) :-
    (   member(H1, T), dif(H, H1)
    ;   not_all_equal_(T)
    ).

This however does not always have the best behaviour:

?- not_all_equal([A,B,C]), A = a, B = b.
A = a,
B = b ;
A = a,
B = b,
dif(a, C) ;
A = a,
B = b,
dif(b, C) ;
false.

In this example, only the first answer should come out, the two other ones are superfluous.

  • I'd probably call it not_all_same since "equal" has a bit of a numeric connotation to it. :) – lurker Nov 24 '17 at 13:07
  • Related. – false Nov 24 '17 at 15:18
4

Here's a straightforward way you can do it and preserve !

not_all_equal([E|Es]) :-
   some_dif(Es, E).

some_dif([X|Xs], E) :-
   (  dif(X, E)
   ;  X = E, some_dif(Xs, E)
   ).

Here are some sample queries using SWI-Prolog 7.7.2.

First, the most general query:

?- not_all_equal(Es).
   dif(_A,_B), Es = [_A,_B|_C]
;  dif(_A,_B), Es = [_A,_A,_B|_C]
;  dif(_A,_B), Es = [_A,_A,_A,_B|_C]
;  dif(_A,_B), Es = [_A,_A,_A,_A,_B|_C]
;  dif(_A,_B), Es = [_A,_A,_A,_A,_A,_B|_C]
...

Next, the query the OP gave in the question:

?- not_all_equal([A,B,C]), A=a, B=b.
   A = a, B = b
;  false.                          % <- the toplevel hints at non-determinism

Last, let's put the subgoal A=a, B=b upfront:

?- A=a, B=b, not_all_equal([A,B,C]).
   A = a, B = b
;  false.                          % <- (non-deterministic, like above)

Good, but ideally the last query should have succeeded deterministically!


Enter library(reif)

First argument indexing takes the principal functor of the first predicate argument (plus a few simple built-in tests) into account to improve the determinism of sufficiently instantiated goals.

This, by itself, does not cover dif/2 satisfactorily.

What can we do? Work with reified term equality/inequality—effectively indexing dif/2!

some_dif([X|Xs], E) :-                     % some_dif([X|Xs], E) :-
   if_(dif(X,E), true,                     %    (  dif(X,E), true
       (X = E, some_dif(Xs,E))             %    ;  X = E, some_dif(Xs,E)
      ).                                   %    ).

Notice the similarities of the new and the old implementation!

Above, the goal X = E is redundant on the left-hand side. Let's remove it!

some_dif([X|Xs], E) :-
   if_(dif(X,E), true, some_dif(Xs,E)).

Sweet! But, alas, we're not quite done (yet)!

?- not_all_equal(Xs).
DOES NOT TERMINATE

What's going on?

It turns out that the implementation of dif/3 prevents us from getting a nice answer sequence for the most general query. To do so—without using additional goals forcing fair enumeration—we need a tweaked implementation of dif/3, which I call diffirst/3:

diffirst(X, Y, T) :-
   (  X == Y -> T = false
   ;  X \= Y -> T = true
   ;  T = true,  dif(X, Y)
   ;  T = false, X = Y
   ).

Let's use diffirst/3 instead of dif/3 in the definition of predicate some_dif/2:

some_dif([X|Xs], E) :-
   if_(diffirst(X,E), true, some_dif(Xs,E)).

So, at long last, here are above queries with the new some_dif/2:

?- not_all_equal(Es).                     % query #1
   dif(_A,_B), Es = [_A,_B|_C]
;  dif(_A,_B), Es = [_A,_A,_B|_C]
;  dif(_A,_B), Es = [_A,_A,_A,_B|_C]
...

?- not_all_equal([A,B,C]), A=a, B=b.      % query #2
   A = a, B = b
;  false.

?- A=a, B=b, not_all_equal([A,B,C]).      % query #3
A = a, B = b.

Query #1 does not terminate, but has the same nice compact answer sequence. Good!

Query #2 is still non-determinstic. Okay. To me this is as good as it gets.

Query #3 has become deterministic: Better now!


The bottom line:

  1. Use library(reif) to tame excess non-determinism while preserving logical purity!
  2. diffirst/3 should find its way into library(reif) :)



EDIT: more general using a (suggested by a comment; thx!)

Let's generalize some_dif/2 like so:

:- meta_predicate some(2,?).
some(P_2, [X|Xs]) :-
   if_(call(P_2,X), true, some(P_2,Xs)).

some/2 can be used with reified predicates other than diffirst/3.

Here an update to not_all_equal/1 which now uses some/2 instead of some_dif/2:

not_all_equal([X|Xs]) :-
   some(diffirst(X), Xs).

Above sample queries still give the same answers, so I won't show these here.

  • 2
    For some reason applying the diff on the first element of the list is confusing but it really covers all cases after thinking about it more... should not have overthought it! – Fatalize Nov 25 '17 at 22:32
  • That took me by surprise, too! Looking back at it now it is quite obvious and a direct translation of the original problem statement. – repeat Nov 25 '17 at 22:49
  • 1
    Nice and appropriate over-generalization! However, is that the reason why you think dif/3 should enumerate answers differently? I suspect that there is another predicate where the other order is better. Pure coincidence that enumeration happens to work with your approach. – false Nov 26 '17 at 0:54
  • 2
    What about reformulating some_dif(Es, E). as, say some(Es, dif(E))? – false Nov 26 '17 at 1:10
  • 2
    ... or rather some(dif(E), Es) – false Nov 26 '17 at 1:13
5

Here is a partial implementation using library(reif) for SICStus|SWI. It's certainly correct, as it produces an error when it is unable to proceed. But it lacks the generality we'd like to have.

not_all_equalp([A,B]) :-
   dif(A,B).
not_all_equalp([A,B,C]) :-
   if_(( dif(A,B) ; dif(A,C) ; dif(B,C) ), true, false ).
not_all_equalp([A,B,C,D]) :-
   if_(( dif(A,B) ; dif(A,C) ; dif(A,D) ; dif(B,C) ; dif(B,D) ), true, false ).
not_all_equalp([_,_,_,_,_|_]) :-
   throw(error(representation_error(reified_disjunction),'C\'est trop !')).

?- not_all_equalp(L).
   L = [_A,_B], dif(_A,_B)
;  L = [_A,_A,_B], dif(_A,_B)
;  L = [_A,_B,_C], dif(_A,_B)
;  L = [_A,_A,_A,_B], dif(_A,_B)
;  L = [_A,_A,_B,_C], dif(_A,_B)
;  L = [_A,_B,_C,_D], dif(_A,_B)
;
! error(representation_error(reified_disjunction),'C\'est trop !')

?- not_all_equalp([A,B,C]), A = a, B = b.
   A = a,
   B = b
;  false.

Edit: Now I realize that I do not need to add that many dif/2 goals at all! It suffices that one variable is different to the first one! No need for mutual exclusivity! I still feel a bit insecure to remove the dif(B,C) goals ...

not_all_equalp([A,B]) :-
   dif(A,B).
not_all_equalp([A,B,C]) :-
   if_(( dif(A,B) ; dif(A,C) ), true, false ).
not_all_equalp([A,B,C,D]) :-
   if_(( dif(A,B) ; dif(A,C) ; dif(A,D) ), true, false ).
not_all_equalp([_,_,_,_,_|_]) :-
   throw(error(representation_error(reified_disjunction),'C\'est trop !')).

The answers are exactly the same... what is happening here, me thinks. Is this version weaker, that is less consistent?

  • 1
    IMO ?- dif(X,Y,T). would really benefit from having the same solution order as ( T = true, dif(X,Y) ; T = false, X=Y ) ! – repeat Nov 25 '17 at 0:37
  • 1
    Actually, this goes beyond dif/3; it's a coding convention for reified predicates which I'd like to propose. Why? (1) It gives a bit more control to library(reif) users, in a intuitive way. (2) It stresses the similarity to conventional Prolog disjunction. (3) The answer sequence would start out the same. Additional answers (missing when using (->)/2 or if/3) would not be presented up-front. According to "communication 101": to reach an agreement, first stress the common and then expand on it (not vice versa)... does that make sense to you? Will write up an answer to this question. – repeat Nov 25 '17 at 15:22
  • 1
    I cannot see any advantage here for this example... – false Nov 26 '17 at 0:02

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.