1

I was tripping over an odd bug in my code where an event on a parent element appeared to fire before the event on it's child, meaning that my e.stopPropagation() had no effect.

Demo:

$(document).ready(function() {

  // Binding directly to the elements
  $(".red1").on("click", function(e) {
    alert("Clicked red1");
  });
  $(".green1").on("click", function(e) {
    alert("Clicked green1");
    e.stopPropagation();
  });

  // Binding the child from a descendant selector 
  $(".red2").on("click", function(e) {
    alert("Clicked red2");
  });
  $("body").on("click", ".green2", function(e) {
    alert("Clicked green2");
    e.stopPropagation();
  });

});
.red1,
.red2 {
  display: inline-block;
  width: 200px;
  height: 200px;
  background-color: #800;
}

.green1,
.green2 {
  display: inline-block;
  width: 100px;
  height: 100px;
  background-color: #080;
}
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>

<div class="red1">
  <div class="green1"></div>
</div>

<div class="red2">
  <div class="green2"></div>
</div>

  • Clicking the green square on the left works as expected and shows a single alert.
  • Clicking the green square on the right appears to fire the parent's event, followed by the child's.

I assume that this is due to a misunderstanding of how the binding works on my part, but I can't seem to get my head around why they're occurring in this order.

Can anyone explain why this is happening?

8
  • 2
    It's because you're using a delegated event handler. This means that for the event to fire it has to bubble up .red2 (hence the 'parent' event handler fires) then the originator is checked to see if it was .green2, and if it was the delegated event handler is executed. To avoid this behaviour, either don't use a delegated event handler, or place all events on the parent .red elements, and check the originator yourself. – Rory McCrossan Nov 24 '17 at 16:53
  • @RoryMcCrossan Ah, so binding using the descendant selector effectively binds to the parent element, and then for every time that's fired, it checks where the event originated? (and fires the handler if it matches the descendant query string) – DBS Nov 24 '17 at 16:55
  • To sort of expand upon what Rory said, .red2 is being fired first because the green div is inside of .red2, but the .green2 is being "fired" once the click event bubbles up to the <body> element. That propagation takes a bit of time (not a whole lot, but enough for us to see a difference) – Jhecht Nov 24 '17 at 16:56
  • @DBS that's right - it's how jQuery's delegated event handlers work. – Rory McCrossan Nov 24 '17 at 16:59
  • 1
    @Jhecht you're right, my bad. For some reason I read the parent selector as .red2. – Rory McCrossan Nov 24 '17 at 17:08
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The issue is because you're using a delegated event handler.

This means that for the event to fire it has to bubble up to the designated parent element (body in your case). As the event passes through .red2 the static handler you assigned to that element fires. Then delegated event handler checks to see if the event originator was .green2. If it was then delegated event handler is executed. This is why the parent handler fires first.

To avoid this behaviour, you can either avoid delegated event handlers, which isn't always possible as they are incredibly useful, or place all events on the parent elements, and check the originator manually, like this:

$(".red2").on("click", function(e) {
  if ($(e.target).is('.green2')) {
    alert("Clicked green2");
    e.stopPropagation();
  } else {
    alert("Clicked red2");
  }
});
.red1,
.red2 {
  display: inline-block;
  width: 200px;
  height: 200px;
  background-color: #800;
}

.green1,
.green2 {
  display: inline-block;
  width: 100px;
  height: 100px;
  background-color: #080;
}
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>

<div class="red2">
  <div class="green2"></div>
</div>

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