I have a class called ArrayType and ListType which both implement these fields:

public readonly Type underlyingType;
public readonly bool isUnderlyingTypeComplex;

Somewhere along my implementation i need to access those fields in either ArrayType or ListType, so i created a base class called UnderlyingType:

abstract class UnderlyingType
{
        public readonly Type underlyingType;
        public readonly bool isUnderlyingTypeComplex;
}

Problem is i need to implement both fields in the base class constructor and i cant do it in the derived class. One solution its just checking the derived class type and implement it like this:

public UnderlyingType()
{
    if (this.GetType() == typeof(ArrayType))
    {
        underlyingType = workingType.GetElementType();
        isUnderlyingTypeComplex = FXS_Utils.IsComplexType(underlyingType);
    }
    else
    {
        underlyingType = workingType.GetGenericArguments()[0];
        isUnderlyingTypeComplex = FXS_Utils.IsComplexType(underlyingType);
    }
}

But this defeat readability at least for me... also interfaces cant have fields, so how do i implement readonly fields in this case?.

Also, why i dont choose a readonly property?. Well cause i want to explicitly tell whoever is reading my source, that those fields will never change after construction. Its a thing about semantics, more than anything...

  • Don't use a field: public Type underlyingType { get; protected set; } – Hans Passant Nov 25 '17 at 0:57
  • Is it that important to your clients that the "readonly" semantics are explicit? Standard practice when making an immutable object is to use properties. – Blorgbeard Nov 25 '17 at 0:57
  • This tells me that the property can be changed after construction, which is exactly why i wanted to use readonly field... – ffenix Nov 25 '17 at 0:58
  • @Blorgbeard well more than anything just a curiosity question, i was wondering what solution (if there is one beside readonly properties) i have for this. – ffenix Nov 25 '17 at 0:59
  • 1
    Well, there isn't one that I know of. – Blorgbeard Nov 25 '17 at 1:02
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Well this was my way of solving this the best i could:

internal interface IUnderlyingType
{
    Type underlyingType { get; }
    bool isUnderlyingTypeComplex { get; }
}

And in the ArrayType class for example:

    public readonly Type underlyingType;
    public readonly bool isUnderlyingTypeComplex;

    //Internal Interface implementation
    Type IUnderlyingType.underlyingType { get { return underlyingType; } }
    bool IUnderlyingType.isUnderlyingTypeComplex { get { return isUnderlyingTypeComplex; } }

This way i can keep the readonly fields for my clients and a internal interface for implementing this in other objects that use underlyingTypes, like ListType.

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