34

I have a file with a word written on it. I want my script to put that word in a variable.

How can I do that?

49

in several of a million ways...

simplest is probably

my_var=$(cat my_file)

If you use bash and you want to get spiffy you can use bash4's mapfile, which puts an entire file into an array variable, one line per cell

mapfile my_var < my_file
  • Since when is spacing before and after = allowed in shell scripting? – orlp Jan 20 '11 at 16:44
  • 1
    @nightcracker sorry, brainfart, I had already corrected it before I saw your comment – wich Jan 20 '11 at 16:49
  • newlines will make the first part try to execute and fail with a command not found error use var=$(cat file | tr -d '\n') to remove all new lines, including any trailing ones – Jonathan Jul 5 '17 at 10:51
  • @Jonathan no it won't – wich Jul 5 '17 at 14:46
  • that's what worked for me – Jonathan Jul 13 '17 at 17:55
33

The simplest way is probably:

var=$(< file)

which doesn't create a new process.

  • 2
    This works in Bash and other advanced shells, but not in the Bourne shell. – Dennis Williamson Jan 20 '11 at 18:31
  • 2
    not cross platform... won't work in sh see stackoverflow.com/questions/7427262/… – Amos Folarin Jun 26 '15 at 17:38
  • Does anyone/anything even still use non-bash sh in 2018? Maybe Dick Tracy's watch?? – David Tonhofer Mar 22 '18 at 17:32
  • Warning: no space prior to the “<” (i.e. (< instead of ( <). – neverMind9 Mar 10 at 13:31
3

I think the easiest way is something like

$ myvar=`cat file`
  • 4
    It's not necessary to export the variable and the spaces around the equal sign won't work. – Dennis Williamson Jan 20 '11 at 18:29
2
var="`cat /path/to/file`"

This is the simple way. Be careful with newlines in the file.

var="`head -1 /path/to/file`"

This will only get the first line and will never include a newline.

  • I have a file nammed "log", and $x="`cat log`" results in =2: command not found – Tom Brito Jan 20 '11 at 16:45
  • removed the $ oops.. – jamesbtate Jan 20 '11 at 16:47
1

I think it will strip newlines, but here it is anyway:

variable=$(cat filename)
  • 4
    It will only strip the final newline. If you seem to be getting the other newlines stripped, it's because you're not quoting the variable on output. echo $variable vs. echo "$variable" – Dennis Williamson Jan 20 '11 at 18:31
  • @Dennis: That's it. – orlp Jan 20 '11 at 18:48

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