8

In Python 3.6.3 Is there a way to loop though one list after another?

For example:

deck = [(value, suit) for value in range(2, 11) +
            ["J", "Q", "K", "A"] for suit in ["H", "C", "D", "S"]]

(In this case, I want to loop through the face cards right after the non-face cards.)

For clarification: The above line throws a:

TypeError: unsupported operand type(s) for +: 'range' and 'list'

This is my problem.

  • Your example is unclear. What's the expected result/output? – timgeb Nov 26 '17 at 19:02
  • @timgeb In the example, I'm trying to make a standard deck of 52 cards. The problem is that I want to iteration through {"J", "Q", "K", "A"} right after the numbered cards without needing a second loop. – Josh Nov 26 '17 at 19:04
  • @schwobaseggl This line throws a type error: "TypeError: unsupported operand type(s) for +: 'range' and 'list'" – Josh Nov 26 '17 at 19:07
  • 2
    @Josh range() does not create a list in Python 3. It used to create a list in Python 2. range() in Python 3 does create an immutable sequence type, not a list. – Elis Byberi Nov 26 '17 at 19:24
17

range doesn't return a list in Python3, so range(2, 10) + ["J", "Q", "K", "A"] doesn't work, but list(range(2, 10)) + ["J", "Q", "K", "A"] does. You can also use itertools.chain to concatenate iterables:

from itertools import chain 

chain(range(2, 10), ["J", "Q", "K", "A"])
# or even shorter:
chain(range(2, 10), "JQKA")  # as strings themselves are iterables

# so this comprehension will work
deck = [
   (value, suit) 
   for value in chain(range(2, 10), "JQKA") 
   for suit in "HCDS"
]

The nested comprehension does, of course, constitute a cartesian product which you can also use a util for:

from itertools import product
deck = list(product(chain(range(2, 10), "JQKA"), "HCDS"))
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8

The problem with your current code is here:

range(2, 10) + ["J", "Q", "K", "A"]

First off, it should be range(2, 11), otherwise, cards with the number 10 are omitted. Second, in order to join the range and the list, you'll have to do like so:

list(range(2, 11)) + ["J", "Q", "K", "A"]

So the final result will be:

deck = [(value, suit) for value in list(range(2, 11)) + ["J", "Q", "K", "A"] for suit in ["H", "C", "D", "S"]]

I think this will give you the desired output (first all non-face cards, then all face cards).

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  • 1
    This will work, but @schwobaseggl has a better solution using itertools, since it does not require unnecessary construction of a list, and then list concatenation. – Jack Aidley Nov 26 '17 at 21:12
5

See @schwobaseggl's solution for what you want, but I usually prefer to represent cards as a 2 character string, however:

deck = [r+s for r in '23456789TJQKA' for s in 'hcds']

This is more readable in my opinion, and will still behave a lot like a tuple of rank, suit.

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3

In Python3, you can use unpacking:

deck = [(value, suit) for value in [*range(2, 10), "J", "Q", "K", "A"] for suit in ["H", "C", "D", "S"]]
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  • 1
    No need for the list call there: [*range(2, 10), "J", "Q", "K", "A"] is enough. (Or even [*range(2, 11), *"JQKA"].) – Mark Dickinson Nov 26 '17 at 19:16
  • @MarkDickinson good to know. Please see my recent edit. – Ajax1234 Nov 26 '17 at 19:36
2

Focusing only in the error you do get:

TypeError: unsupported operand type(s) for +: 'range' and 'list

I will give you an explanation.

Your current code does work in Python 2:

deck = [(value, suit) for value in range(2, 11) + ["J", "Q", "K", "A"] for suit in ["H", "C", "D", "S"]]
print deck

will print:

[(2, 'H'), (2, 'C'), (2, 'D'), (2, 'S'), (3, 'H'), (3, 'C'), (3, 'D'), (3, 'S'), (4, 'H'), (4, 'C'), (4, 'D'), (4, 'S'), (5, 'H'), (5, 'C'), (5, 'D'), (5, 'S'), (6, 'H'), (6, 'C'), (6, 'D'), (6, 'S'), (7, 'H'), (7, 'C'), (7, 'D'), (7, 'S'), (8, 'H'), (8, 'C'), (8, 'D'), (8, 'S'), (9, 'H'), (9, 'C'), (9, 'D'), (9, 'S'), (10, 'H'), (10, 'C'), (10, 'D'), (10, 'S'), ('J', 'H'), ('J', 'C'), ('J', 'D'), ('J', 'S'), ('Q', 'H'), ('Q', 'C'), ('Q', 'D'), ('Q', 'S'), ('K', 'H'), ('K', 'C'), ('K', 'D'), ('K', 'S'), ('A', 'H'), ('A', 'C'), ('A', 'D'), ('A', 'S')]

In Python 3 you have to use list(range(2, 11)):

deck = [(value, suit) for value in list(range(2, 11)) + ["J", "Q", "K", "A"] for suit in ["H", "C", "D", "S"]]
print(deck)

will print:

[(2, 'H'), (2, 'C'), (2, 'D'), (2, 'S'), (3, 'H'), (3, 'C'), (3, 'D'), (3, 'S'), (4, 'H'), (4, 'C'), (4, 'D'), (4, 'S'), (5, 'H'), (5, 'C'), (5, 'D'), (5, 'S'), (6, 'H'), (6, 'C'), (6, 'D'), (6, 'S'), (7, 'H'), (7, 'C'), (7, 'D'), (7, 'S'), (8, 'H'), (8, 'C'), (8, 'D'), (8, 'S'), (9, 'H'), (9, 'C'), (9, 'D'), (9, 'S'), (10, 'H'), (10, 'C'), (10, 'D'), (10, 'S'), ('J', 'H'), ('J', 'C'), ('J', 'D'), ('J', 'S'), ('Q', 'H'), ('Q', 'C'), ('Q', 'D'), ('Q', 'S'), ('K', 'H'), ('K', 'C'), ('K', 'D'), ('K', 'S'), ('A', 'H'), ('A', 'C'), ('A', 'D'), ('A', 'S')]

You have to use list() because range() in Python 3 does create an immutable sequence type, not a list.

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