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I am a bit confused about when the event loop spins in the browser.

The questions are:

  • Does a task and the pending microtasks, happen in the same loop iteration/turn/tick?
  • Which are the actual conditions that need to be met in order for the loop to turn?
  • Are these conditions the same in node.js event loop? - I don't know if this is a stupid question.

Let's say we have a webpage and in the front end we have JavaScript code that schedules a task and waits for a promise (which is a microtask). Is the execution of the promise considered to happen in the same turn of the event loop as the task, or in different iterations?

I currently assume that they all happen in the same iteration. Since if betting otherwise, in the case of microtasks executing while mid-task, that would mean that the task would require multiple loop iterations in order to fully complete. Which seems wired to me. Would it be correct to also say that the update rendering part, that may occur after each task, happens in the same loop turn?

Thank you in advance!

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I know I am supposed to add a comment, but it is going to be a long one, and I also need to write code, so I am editing the question and asking for clarification here.

@T.J. Crowder Thank you so much for your time and detailed explanation!

I had indeed misread "microtasks are processed after callbacks (as long as no other JavaScript is mid-execution)" in this great article and had gotten a bit confused.

I also had questions about the 4ms setTimout for which I couldn't find information about, so thanks for that info also.

One last thing, though... If we were to mark the loop ticks between the example code, where would we put them (assuming console.logs do not exist)?

Suppose we have a function named exampleCode, having the following body:

setTimeout(setTimeoutCallback, 0);
Promise.resolve().then(promiseCallback);

For the above code, my guess would be...

Just before executing exampleCode (macro)task:

  • first loop tick
  • setTimeoutCallback (macro)task scheduling
  • Promise.then microtask scheduling
  • promiseCallback execution
  • second loop tick
  • setTimeoutCallback execution
  • third loop tick

Or is there an additional loop tick between between Promise.then microtask scheduling and promiseCallback execution ?

Thank you in advance once again!

  • 1
    Would this help? – evolutionxbox Nov 27 '17 at 10:25
  • (Belatedly) There has to be a dupetarget for this... – T.J. Crowder Nov 27 '17 at 10:35
  • @evolutionxbox Yeah, I've come across this article and doesn't have enough info. Thanks though! – test test Nov 29 '17 at 17:27
1

Does a task and the pending microtasks, happen in the same loop iteration/turn/tick?

The task occurs, then when it ends, any pending microtasks it scheduled are run.

Which are the actual conditions that need to be met in order for the loop to turn?

It's not clear what you mean by this. It may be easier to think in terms of jobs and a job queue (which is the ECMAScript spec's terminology): If there is a pending job and the thread servicing that queue is not doing something else, it picks up the job and runs it to completion.

Are these conditions the same in node.js event loop?

Close enough, yes.

Let's say we have a webpage and in the front end we have JavaScript code that schedules a task and waits for a promise (which is a microtask). Is the execution of the promise considered to happen in the same turn of the event loop as the task, or in different iterations?

In a browser (and in Node), it happens after the task completes, when the task's microtasks (if any) are run, before the next queued task/job gets picked up.

For instance:

// This code is run in a task/job

console.log("Scheduling (macro)task/job");
setTimeout(() => {
    console.log("timeout callback ran");
}, 0);

console.log("Scheduling microtask/job");
Promise.resolve().then(() => {
    console.log("promise then callback ran");
});

console.log("main task complete");

On a compliant browser (and Node), that will output:

Scheduling (macro)task/job
Scheduling microtask/job
main task complete
promise then callback ran
timeout callback ran

...because the microtask ran when the main task completed, before the next macrotask ran.

(Note that setTimeout(..., 0) will indeed schedule the timer to run immediately on compliant browsers provided it's not a nested timeout; more here. You'll see people saying there is no "setTimeout 0", but that's outdated information. It's only clamped to 4ms if the timer's nesting level is > 5.)

More to explore:


Re the code and question in the edit/comment:

setTimeout(setTimeoutCallback, 0);
Promise.resolve().then(promiseCallback);

Your guess looks pretty good. Here's how I'd describe it:

  1. Schedule the task to run that script
  2. (When thread is next free)
    1. Pick up the next task (from #1 above)
    2. Run that task:
      1. Create the task for the timer callback
        • In parallel, queue the task when the time comes
      2. Queue a microtask for the promise then callback
      3. End of task
    3. Microtask check
      • Run the then callback
  3. (When thread is next free)
    1. Pick up the next task (the one for the timer callback)
    2. Run the task
    3. End of task
    4. Microtask check (none to do in this case)

The processing model text explicitly calls out that the task ends prior to the microtask check, but I don't think that's observable in any real way.

  • Thank you so much! This is great. Please read my edited question, since adding a comment here would be too long. – test test Nov 29 '17 at 17:17
  • Thank you! So, we've come to the conclusion that a (macro)task and pending microtasks, happen in the same loop iteration. – test test Nov 29 '17 at 19:15
  • @testtest: It's semantics, but that's how I read the spec, yeah. Microtasks scheduled by a task are run immediately after the task is complete, before the next task is pulled from the queue. So whether that's during the loop or between loops doesn't really matter. :-) (BTW: Node JS has two levels of microtasks IIRC, for historic reasons -- they did microtasks before they were formalized.) – T.J. Crowder Nov 29 '17 at 19:18

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