5

I have the following data frame:

col1 <- rep(c("A","B","C","D"),10)
col2 <- rep(c(1,0),10)
col3 <- rep(c(0,1),10)
col4 <- rep(c(1,0),10)
col5 <- rep(c(0,1),10)

test_df <- data.frame(col1, col2, col3, col4, col5, stringsAsFactors = F)

I would like to color specific row cells across multiple columns based on the values in col1, and also add a vertical line (indicating a limit) between two columns in the table (based on the same value in col1)

For example, if col1 == "A", then i want to color the cells in col2 and col5 grey, in the same row as col1 == A.

In dummy code:

if col1 == A: color columns(col2, col5), vert.line between col3 and col4
if col1 == B: color columns(col2, col3, col5), vert.line between col4 and col5
if col1 == C: color columns(col2, col4, col5), vert.line between col3 and col4
if col1 == D: color columns(col2, col5), vert.line between col2 and col3

I would like to specify these rules so they can easily be changed if necessary.

I want to end up with something like this (asterisks indicate cell coloring):

col1   col2   col3   col4   col5
A      *1*     0   | 1      *0*
B      *0*    *1*    0    | *1*
C      *1*    *0*  | 1      *0*
D      *0*  |  1     0      *1*
A      *1*     0   | 1      *0*
B      *0*    *1*    0    | *1*
C      *1*    *0*  | 1      *0*
D      *0*  |  1     0      *1*

I am presenting this in a table in a shiny app and markdown document. Is there any way to do this with f. ex xtable or dplyr?

7
  • 1
    In order to get cell coloring, you will have to produce an HTML table. R doesn't have cell coloring as you would know it from spreadsheet programs. Nov 27, 2017 at 10:36
  • @RomanLuštrik I see! How would you propose I do that? Is it possible to directly present a html table in shiny?
    – Haakonkas
    Nov 27, 2017 at 11:18
  • 1
    In shiny, the function renderDataTable uses javascript library to create the table. It has loads of options. It's good place to have a look in.
    – thepule
    Nov 27, 2017 at 11:36
  • This is on our todo list with @clemens to add on tableHTML package. We have already implemented column conditional formatting and we hope to do row conditional formatting too, soon. Maybe have a look at our conditional vignette to see if there is anything you can work with. The package is compatible with shiny.
    – LyzandeR
    Nov 27, 2017 at 12:13
  • @thepule unfortunately I do not want an interactive table, just a regular one is preferred. However, it did give me what I wanted with the formatStyle(backgroundcolor = styleEqual(col2, "grey")) command. I don't know how to add the lines in between the columns though
    – Haakonkas
    Nov 27, 2017 at 13:41

2 Answers 2

3

There is a solution using tableHTML in combination with 2 functions to replicate the logic.

First, you need to create css for each column that provides the styling information that should be applied to the table. I have split it into 2 functions, one for the background, and one for the line between columns.

library(tableHTML)

The first function changes the colour of cells based on the value in col1. You can change them by providing different colours in the arguments of the function.

get_background_column_css <- function(col1,
                                   a_col = "lightgray",
                                   b_col = "steelblue",
                                   c_col = "lightgreen",
                                   d_col = "indianred",
                                   default = "white") {
  # create css for col2
  background_color_col2 <- ifelse(col1 == "A", a_col, 
                      ifelse(col1 == "B", b_col,
                      ifelse(col1 == "C", c_col,
                      ifelse(col1 == "D", d_col, default
                             ))))
  css_col2 <- setNames(list(list(c("background-color"),
                     list(background_color_col2))), "col2")

  # create css for col3
  background_color_col3 <- ifelse(col1 == "B", b_col,
                                  ifelse(col1 == "C", c_col, default))
  css_col3 <- setNames(list(list(c("background-color"),
                                 list(background_color_col3))), "col3")
  # create css for col4
  background_color_col4 <- rep("", length(col1))
  css_col4 <- setNames(list(list(c("background-color"),
                                 list(background_color_col4))), "col4")
  # create css for col5
  background_color_col5 <- ifelse(col1 == "A", a_col, 
                                  ifelse(col1 == "B", b_col,
                                         ifelse(col1 == "C", c_col,
                                                ifelse(col1 == "D", d_col, default
                                                ))))
  css_col5 <- setNames(list(list(c("background-color"),
                                 list(background_color_col5))), "col5")

  list(css_col2, css_col3, css_col4, css_col5)
}

The second function adds a border between columns.

get_border_column_css <- function(col1) {
  # create css for col2
  border_col2 <- ifelse(col1 == "D", "1px solid black", "0px")
  css_col2 <- setNames(list(list(c("border-right"),
                                 list(border_col2))), "col2")
  # create css for col3
  border_col3 <- ifelse(col1 == "C", "1px solid black", "0px")
  css_col3 <- setNames(list(list(c("border-right"),
                                 list(border_col3))), "col3")
  # create css for col4
  border_col4 <- ifelse(col1 == "B", "1px solid black", "0px")
  css_col4 <- setNames(list(list(c("border-right"),
                                 list(border_col4))), "col4")
  # create css for col5
  border_col5 <- rep("0px", length(col1))
  css_col5 <- setNames(list(list(c("border-right"),
                                 list(border_col5))), "col5")

  list(css_col2, css_col3, css_col4, css_col5)
}

In order to test the function, I only use the first 4 rows (since they have all the combinations of possibilities):

test_df <- head(test_df, 4)

Next, I create 1 css list for the background-color and 1 css list for the border that can be supplied to add_css_conditional_column()

css_background = get_background_column_css(test_df$col1)
css_border = get_border_column_css(test_df$col1)

Next, I create a tableHTML object.

tableHTML <- tableHTML(test_df,
                       rownames = FALSE,
                       border = 0) 

Next, I add the background css in a loop to each column:

for (i in 1:4) {
  tableHTML <- tableHTML %>%
    add_css_conditional_column(conditional = "colour_rank",
                               colour_rank_css = css_background[[i]],
                               columns = names(test_df)[i + 1])
}

And the border css:

for (i in 1:4) {
  tableHTML <- tableHTML %>%
    add_css_conditional_column(conditional = "colour_rank",
                               colour_rank_css = css_border[[i]],
                               columns = names(test_df)[i + 1])
}

This is the result:

tableHTML

output

6
  • 1
    Thank you for a brilliant solution! Just what I was looking for.
    – Haakonkas
    Nov 28, 2017 at 8:55
  • Somehow I get the error "Error in if (condition[i - 1]) { : argument is of length zero" when I try this on my data frame during the for loop. for (i in 1:4) indicates the rows right? I read a bit about the error, and ran the is.null(data$column) test, which returns FALSE. Any suggestions?
    – Haakonkas
    Nov 28, 2017 at 10:23
  • I am looping through the columns here, the number of rows doesn't change the code and it runs on a longer dataframe without changing the loops.
    – clemens
    Nov 28, 2017 at 10:37
  • The original data frame i use have additional columns that i want to include in the table, however I believe that those can create an error with the for loop? Or are they included as well? Or do I just have to specify that the for-loop should only cover columns 5:23 for example? (In the for (i in 5:23) statement)
    – Haakonkas
    Nov 28, 2017 at 10:46
  • if you want to apply conditional formatting to more columns, you need to adapt the functions that create the custom css and the for loop. If you only want to include more columns in the tableHTML, you don't have to change it.
    – clemens
    Nov 28, 2017 at 12:33
0

Here is a partial (doesn't do the custom line separation between columns) solution.

For the following, I leverage the package formattable.

The dataframe used is df as defined in your question.

library(formattable)
library(dplyr)

## Function that create the formula for the coloring of each row
## You could also personalize the color
color_row <- function(r,
                      c,
                      color = 'gray') {

  return(area(row = r, col = c) ~ color_tile(color, color))
}

## Create database that containes info on coloring pattern
df_color <- data_frame(col1 = c('A', 'B', 'C', 'D'),
                       limits = list(c(2,5), c(2,3,5), c(2,4,5), c(2,5)))


## Join it to original data.frame
df_join <- df %>% left_join(df_color) 

## Create list with all the appropriate formulas to color data frame
format_list <- mapply(color_row, r = 1:nrow(df), c = df_join$limits, color = 'gray')

## Pass it to formattable
df_final <- formattable(df,format_list) 

The result looks like this: enter image description here

This can be easily used in RNotebook and Shiny. Following example codes for each (for the code below to work, you need the result of the previous code df_final to be in your environment):

---
title: "R Notebook"
output: html_notebook
---

```{r}
library(dplyr)
library(formattable)
format_table(df_final)
```

Shiny:

library(shiny)
library(formattable)
  # table example
  shinyApp(
    ui = fluidPage(
      fluidRow(
        column(12,
               formattableOutput('table')
        )
      )
    ),

    server = function(input, output) {


      output$table <- renderFormattable(df_final)
    }
  )

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