In my code I have the following two methods:

public void AllDivisors(int max) {
     lrel[int,list[int]] div = [ <i,d> | int i <- [0 .. max], list[int] d <- GetDivisors(i)];
     println("<div>");
}

public list[int] GetDivisors(int n) {
      return [ p | p <- [1..n], n % p == 0];
}

The second one (GetDivisors) gives the list of divisors for n and returns those as a list[int]. Next I want to map those on the values of n using a lrel in the first method (AllDivisors). I was trying to get this done in one go using a list comprehension, but this doesn't seem to work.

rascal>GetDivisors(10);
list[int]: [1,2,5]

rascal>AllDivisors(10);
|project://Sevo/src/NumberEx.rsc|(189,1,<8,85>,<8,86>): Expected int, but    got list[int]
Advice: |http://tutor.rascal-mpl.org/Errors/Static/UnexpectedType/UnexpectedType.html|

I'm having a hard time figuring out where Rascal is expecting an int but getting a list[int]. I suppose it's in d <- GetDivisors(i). How can I generate the correct tuples in my list-comprehension?

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It is in:

list[int] d <- GetDivisors(i)

when you iterate over the results of GetDivisors you are getting int's not, list[int]'s. So changing that to int d, or just d (type inference) should be good enough.

you could also do this:

lrel[int,list[int]] div = [ <i,d> | int i <- [0 .. max], list[int] d := GetDivisors(i)];

This binds the d variable to the result of GetDivisors

But for this case I would write it as follows:

div = [ <i, GetDivisors(i)> | i <- [0..max]];
  • That last expression is spot on! – Ruben Steins Nov 27 '17 at 11:04

The root of your problem is list[int] d <- GetDivisors(i). Since GetDivisors returns list[int] its elements are of type int.

So the first fix is: int d <- GetDivisors(i).

But now you will also have to fix the type of div into lrel[int,int] div.

The complete example then becomes:

public void AllDivisors(int max) {

    lrel[int,int] div = [ <i,d> | int i <- [0 .. max], int d <- GetDivisors(i)];
    println("<div>"); }

 public list[int] GetDivisors(int n) {
    return [ p | p <- [1..n], n % p == 0]; }

A note on style: we usually let function names start with a lower case letter.

  • 2
    I really wanted the lrel to have type [int, list[int]] though. Tuples of int and list[int]. And for you remark on style: I'll try to do better :). I spend most of my days in C#, so those conventions come naturally. – Ruben Steins Nov 27 '17 at 11:02

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.