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I have used BOOST_STRONG_TYPEDEF before, mainly with std::string and I got satisfactory results:

#include <boost/serialization/strong_typedef.hpp>
#include <iostream>

BOOST_STRONG_TYPEDEF(std::string, TIMER_ID)
BOOST_STRONG_TYPEDEF(std::string, PROCESS_ID)

int main()
{
    TIMER_ID t_id("Timer");
    PROCESS_ID p_id("Process");

    if (t_id == p_id)
        std::cout << "They are equal!" << std::endl;
}

The previous code fails to compile as expected:

In file included from /usr/include/boost/serialization/strong_typedef.hpp:26:0,
                 from types.cpp:1:
/usr/include/boost/operators.hpp: In instantiation of ‘bool boost::operator==(const std::__cxx11::basic_string<char>&, const PROCESS_ID&)’:
types.cpp:12:14:   required from here
/usr/include/boost/operators.hpp:144:64: error: no match for ‘operator==’ (operand types are ‘const PROCESS_ID’ and ‘const std::__cxx11::basic_string<char>’)
      friend bool operator==(const U& y, const T& x) { return x == y; }

However, this code compiles just fine:

#include <boost/serialization/strong_typedef.hpp>
#include <iostream>

BOOST_STRONG_TYPEDEF(unsigned int, TIMER_ID)
BOOST_STRONG_TYPEDEF(unsigned int, PROCESS_ID)

int main()
{
    TIMER_ID t_id(12);
    PROCESS_ID p_id(12);

    if (t_id == p_id)
    {
        std::cout << "They are equal!" << std::endl;
        std::cout << "Their sum is " << t_id + p_id << std::endl;
    }
}

This doesn't seem strong at all! I would expect to not be able to compare or add objects of two different types without a static_cast.

  • Why is this happening?
  • How can one accomplish type safety with primitive types without manually creating classes for each type?
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Reading http://www.boost.org/doc/libs/1_63_0/libs/serialization/doc/strong_typedef.html

The macro creates new classes for you already. The problem that you're having is that the conversion is working exactly as designed (as per the examples on their site; which also use primitive types).

I think the question about why they're different behaviors is different is the more interesting one; but ultimately the answer seems to be this isn't the library for you if you require this check to fail to compile.

  • Thanks for the answer but it doesn't really answer any of my questions. Do you know of any alternatives? – user2891462 Nov 27 '17 at 15:13
  • @user2891462 I'm afraid not, I'd write my own with an ample application of the 'explicit' keyword. I might have a chance to come back to this tonight to see if I can work out the why it's different, but it's probably not going to help you any in what you want to do. – UKMonkey Nov 27 '17 at 15:18

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