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I'm trying to define a 1:1 association between two entities (one maps to a table and the other to a view - using DefinedQuery) in an Entity Framework model. When trying to define the mapping for this in the designer, it makes me choose the (1) table or view to map the association to. What am I supposed to choose? I can choose either of the two tables but then I am forced to choose a column from that table (or view) for each end of the relationship. I would expect to be able to choose a column from one table for one end of the association and a column from the other table for the other end of the association, but there's no way to do this.

Here I've chosen to map to the "DW_ WF_ClaimInfo" view and it is forcing me to choose two columns from that view - one for each end of the relationship.

I've also tried defining the mapping manually in the XML as follows:

<AssociationSetMapping Name="Entity1Entity2" TypeName="ClaimsModel.Entity1Entity2"
     StoreEntitySet="Entity1">
  <EndProperty Name="Entity2">
    <ScalarProperty Name="DOCUMENT" ColumnName="DOCUMENT" />
  </EndProperty>
  <EndProperty Name="Entity1">
    <ScalarProperty Name="PK_DocumentId" ColumnName="PK_DocumentId" />
  </EndProperty>
</AssociationSetMapping>

But this gives: Error 2010: The Column 'DOCUMENT' specified as part of this MSL does not exist in MetadataWorkspace. Seems like it still expects both columns to come from the same table, which doesn't make sense to me.

Furthermore, if I select the same key for each end, e.g.:

<AssociationSetMapping Name="Entity1Entity2" TypeName="ClaimsModel.Entity1Entity2"
     StoreEntitySet="Entity1">
  <EndProperty Name="Entity2">
    <ScalarProperty Name="DOCUMENT" ColumnName="PK_DocumentId" />
  </EndProperty>
  <EndProperty Name="Entity1">
    <ScalarProperty Name="PK_DocumentId" ColumnName="PK_DocumentId" />
  </EndProperty>
</AssociationSetMapping>

I then get:

Error 3021: Problem in Mapping Fragment starting at line 675: Each of the following
columns in table AssignedClaims is mapped to multiple conceptual side properties:
  AssignedClaims.PK_DocumentId is mapped to
    <AssignedClaimDW_WF_ClaimInfo.DW_WF_ClaimInfo.DOCUMENT,
    AssignedClaimDW_WF_ClaimInfo.AssignedClaim.PK_DocumentId>

What am I not getting?

  • 3
    Is there a way you can re-post that image? I have the same problem but I'm not sure if our designs are the same. – Shawn Mclean Apr 8 '10 at 16:10
6

You have to select the table, that cotains the foreign key. The next step is to remove that foreign key from the entity, as it is already expressed using the relation you just created.

Example:

table A
-------
A_ID int
B_ID int


table B
-------
B_ID int

In this case, you would select the table A in the designer, as it contains the foreign key. Also you'll need to remove B_ID from the A entity afterwards.

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0

I was dealing with a legacy app so adding an additional primary key was not an option for me. What I had to do was map it as a 1:(0 or 1) rather than a 1:1 to get it to work. For example if I had two tables say Customer and CustomerDetails that both had a primary key called CustomerID. To create the association, I had to set it up as 1 Customer can relate to (0 or 1) CustomerDetails records. Eveytime you Insert a Customer, make sure to also insert the CustomerDetails so you can maintain the 1:1.

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0

I agree that the way this is set up seems counter-intuitive. For anyone that is too slow (like me) to get driAn's answer: Per the forum post below, I remembered that we are dealing with an entity, not a table directly. The association is on the entity (which could model the table, but doesn't have to).

http://social.msdn.microsoft.com/forums/en-US/adodotnetentityframework/thread/2823634f-9dd1-4547-93b5-17bb8a882ac2/

The entity framework is associating PROPERTIES to TABLE COLUMNS. That is why we must delete the "foreign key" PROPERTY on the ENTITY (note: we are not deleting the table column). To reference the column in code, (using the ENTITY modeling the given example of TABLE A & TABLE B) you would write something like this:

variable_A = tableAs.A_ID
variable_B = tableAs.tableBs.B_ID

The second assignment is using the association defined in the entity to get to the data. There is no PROPERTY called "B_ID" on table A.

That is all assuming I understand it right :). It is at least intelisensing correctly for me now.

:-Dan

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0

In Entity Framework, there should be no foreign keys in the conceptual design. I believe this is now allowed in EF4 (with some tweaking), but in EF3.5, it can't be done.

To fix this, simply delete all properties which represent foreign keys in the EF-designer. Do not delete the primary keys!

If you then get an "Association end is not mapped.." error, see (my answer to) this post.

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0

I received the same error when I tried to do a one-to-one between two tables joined on their primary keys. (No, I didn't design the db). So, the solution of deleting the FK doesn't work - the FK is also the PK, so you are not going to delete it. As an experiment, I changed one side of the association to 0..1, and lo and behold, the model compiled w/o errors. I was using EF3.5

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0

In simple terms I did the following:

  1. Create Table with Primary Key (PK) on a column.
  2. Create a view with Foreign Key (FK) on a column. or vice-versa.
  3. In edmx Diagram Designer, created a Association .
  4. Compile the code.

In XAML metadata code, Parent Entity having PK will show up the child view Entity, that can be associated to bind the items.

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0

After pretty much a whole day working on this, I figured it out! In fact, I found 2 different ways to solve this problem, assuming that I had the same problem Craig had.

First off, driAn's answer doesn't really help (once again, if Craig has the same issue I have), since the issue is that there IS no separate foreign key in table A. Table A's primary key is the exact same primary key for Table B! Specifically in my case, I'm using a view and a table, rather than two tables:

table A
-------
A_ID int
col1 int
col2 int

view A_extra
-------
A_ID int
col3 int

So, here are the solutions I found:

1. Map to two different entities, but use a hack. So the whole problem with driAn's answer is that we don't have a separate foreign key column to map to, which we can then delete from the properties (we can't delete it from the properties because it's the primary key of view A_extra!). So the hack is insanely simple once you realize it: edit A_extra and simply create a copy of A_ID and make it the stand-in foreign key:

table A
-------
A_ID int
col1 int
col2 int

view A_extra
-------
A_ID int
A_FK_ID int        
col3 int

A_FK_ID is simply defined as 'A_ID as A_FK_ID' in the view's SQL, and it will always have the exact same value as A_ID.

Now, to entity framework, this is a very familiar scenario. Simply create the 1-to-1 association, map the association to A_extra, and map property A_ID in table A to A_FK_ID and property A_ID in A_extra to A_ID. Now you're no longer making the same column do double duty according to EF! However, the funny thing is of course, A_FK_ID will always be identical to A_ID in A_extra.

Now you have a navigation property to A_extra and col3 is accessible, just as you'd expect. Even better, you can still natively update table_A, since EF sees that it's a table (if you had made a single view from this combination and imported that into EF, you can't natively update it).

2. Map the table and view to a single entity. You don't need a hack for this solution, and it's preferable because you don't have to go through a navigation property to get to col3.

To get this configuration, add both A and A_extra to EF. Copy and paste col3 from A_extra into A, so that you now have unmapped property "col3" sitting in A, and nothing in A_extra. Now go to the mapping for A and add A_extra as a view to be mapped to (so that the entity "A" is now mapped to both the table "A" and the view "A_extra"). Map the property col3 (in entity A) to the column col3 (in view A_extra). Now here's how you show EF how to join the two to create the single entity: map the column A_ID in A_extra to the property ID in entity A. If you notice, you now have TWO columns mapped to the same property. This is ok, since they represent the same thing, and is precisely how EF knows to join on that column.

Now, to finish cleaning things up, you'll have to delete the floating entity "A_extra" in the designer. (You might want to make sure it's not mapped to view A_extra anymore just to be sure that it doesn't take away the store mapping for A_extra either -- I would hope it wouldn't since entity A is now mapped to it). Now you should be able to build and access col1, col2, and col3 all from entity A!

The cool thing is you can update data to col1 and col2 fine, since they're mapped to a table (A), but EF will prevent you like it should from updating col3, since it's mapped to a view (A_extra). This is more convenient than making A a combined view in the DB and importing it, because EF would prevent you from updating any columns, since they're all from a view as far as it's concerned.

Whew, I'm so glad I got this finally working. Hope my solutions helped you guys!

-Robert

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0

First create a foreign key in the database and then create association or update model from database.

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-3

Not shure to have the answer, but with Entity Framework, I always create a primary key in each table (even if I don't need it). Example :

  • Table Customer have CustumerID as primary key
  • Table Product have ProductID as primary key
  • Table Order of course use CustomerID + ProductID as the primary key. Well, I also create a single local primary key : OrderID.
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