I run a weekly CRONTAB that collects hardware info from 40+ remote servers and creates a weekly log file on our report server at the home office. I have a script that I run against this weekly file to output only specific status lines to my display.

#!/bin/sh

# store newest filename to variable
DD_FILE="$(ls -t /home/user/ddinfo/|head -1)"

# List the site name, disk ID (virtual & physical), Status and State of each ID, Failure Prediction for each physical disk, and the site divider
grep -w 'Site\|^ID\|^State\|^Status\|^Failure Predicted\|^##' /home/user/ddinfo/$DD_FILE
echo "/home/user/ddinfo/"$DD_FILE
exit 0

This is a sample output:

Accessing Site: site01
ID                            : 0
Status                        : Ok
State                         : Ready
ID                              : 0:0:0
Status                          : Ok
State                           : Online
Failure Predicted               : No
ID                              : 0:0:1
Status                          : Ok
State                           : Online
Failure Predicted               : No
################################################
Accessing Site: site02
ID                            : 0
Status                        : Ok
State                         : Ready
ID                              : 0:0:0
Status                          : Non-Critical
State                           : Online
Failure Predicted               : Yes
ID                              : 0:0:1
Status                          : Ok
State                           : Online
Failure Predicted               : No
################################################

Is there a way to cat / grep / sed / awk / perl / this output so that any lines that end with either Critical or Yes, get colorized?

  • 1
    Colorized in what context? Shell output to a virtual terminal? That depends totally on the shell and terminal emulator being used, what support the emulator has for color, and the mechanism for embedding color attributes in the output text stream. Many terminal emulators support ANSI escape sequences, so you would need to insert those yourself when processing lines that need to be colorized. – Jim Garrison Nov 27 '17 at 20:59
  • 1
    Have you checked perl's module Term::ANSIColor? – AnFi Nov 27 '17 at 20:59
  • Without color: less -p '.*Critical$|.*Yes$|$' file? – Cyrus Nov 27 '17 at 21:42

With GNU grep:

grep --color -E ".*Yes$|.*Critical$|$" file
  • 1
    oh man, you are right. The ending |$ makes the difference- all lines are kept but only lines matching pattern get colorized. But honestly i hit my head on the wall to understand why this solution works... Brilliant. +1 – George Vasiliou Nov 27 '17 at 21:20
  • @GeorgeVasiliou: This expression shows every line completely colored containing Yes or Critical at the end and shows every line containing a newline. – Cyrus Nov 27 '17 at 21:33
  • The strange thing is that every line containing a new line ($) is NOT colorized. I was expecting your command ending with |$ to colorize all the lines. Anyway, we learnt something new today. – George Vasiliou Nov 27 '17 at 21:36
  • 2
    @GeorgeVasiliou: The zero bytes leading up to the newline are coloured invisibly :D – Jonathan Leffler Nov 27 '17 at 21:37
  • 2
    A tweak to reduce duplicated constructs: grep --color -E '(.*(Yes|Critical))?$' file – Ed Morton Nov 27 '17 at 23:09

You could try , a very nice alternative to grep:

% ack '(Critical|Yes)$' file
# Or to colorize the whole line:
% ack '(.*(Critical|Yes))$' file

See Beyond grep

Or if you want to see all lines and only colorize specific ones:

use Term::ANSIColor qw/ colored /;
while (<$fh>) {
    s/(.*)(Critical|Yes)$/colored(["yellow bold"], $1.$2)/e;
    print;
}
  • 2
    The ack command also has a --passthru option to print all lines regardless of whether they matched. The highlighting of course will only apply to matched lines. – Grant McLean Nov 28 '17 at 20:51

To see all lines but have the lines that end in Critical or Yes colorized, try:

awk -v on="$(tput smso)" -v off="$(tput rmso)" '/(Critical|Yes)$/{$0=on $0 off} 1' logfile

This uses tput to create codes suitable for your terminal. For demonstration purposes, I chose the smso/rmso to set and reset the "standout mode." You can use any other feature that tput supports.

Variation

If we want the text in red instead of "standout mode":

awk -v on="$(tput setaf 1)" -v off="$(tput sgr0)" '/(Critical|Yes)$/{$0=on $0 off} 1' logfile

tput setaf 1 is the code to create red. (In tput, red is 1, green is 2, etc.). tput sgr0 is the code to turn off all attributes.

How it works

  • -v on="$(tput smso)" -v off="$(tput rmso)"

    This defines two awk variables, on and off that turn on and turn off whatever color effect we prefer.

  • /(Critical|Yes)$/{$0=on $0 off}

    For any line that ends with Critical or Yes, we add the on code to the front of the line and the off code to the end.

  • 1

    This is awk's cryptic shorthand for print-the-line.

You could use Term::ANSIColor module of Perl:

... | perl -pne 'BEGIN { use Term::ANSIColor } /: (Yes|Critical)$/ && { $_ = color("red") . "$_" . color("reset") }'
  • This solution didn't work for me. Perl gives the output but without any color. I am on a Mac running 10.12.6 and Perl 5.18. – codeforester Dec 1 '17 at 3:39
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Thank you for all of your responses. I ended up piping the original grep results to another grep | grep --color=auto '.*\(Yes\|Critical\).*\|$' and got the colorized results I wanted:

grep -i 'site\|^ID\|^State\|^Status\|^Failure Predicted\|^##' /home/user/ddinfo/$DD_FILE | grep --color=auto '.*\(Yes\|Critical\).*\|$'

This the new sample output:

Sample Output

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